What are Quaaludes and Why Were They Popular?

Quaaludes--perhaps you’ve heard of them or maybe you have even tried them yourself? Quaaludes are often talked about with a sense of nostalgia, usually being referenced in movies by someone’s grandma who has a secret stash of them left over from the 70’s when the drug was at its height in popularity. More recently however, the drug has hit media headlines, as accusations of alleged sexual assault against Bill Cosby resurfaced. The disgraced, former TV star later admitted to giving Quaaludes to women he wanted to have sex with. It comes as no surprise that the drug was eventually outlawed in 1983 when authorities caught on to the large amount of people who were either abusing the drug recreationally or using it as a date rape drug. So exactly are Quaaludes and why were they popular?

The brief history of Quaaludes

Before the drug was marketed under the brand name of Quaaludes (as well as Sopor) by pharmaceutical companies, the generic name for it was methaqualone. Quaaludes were first synthesized in India during 1951 by Indra Kishore Kacker and Syed Husain Zaheer. Originally, methaqualone was synthesized as a new treatment for malaria when they found that it also had some highly sedative properties aside from what they had created it for. The first two markets it hit were Germany and Japan, where it racked up quite the extensive record of addiction and recreational abuse. Eventually, by 1955 it was being prescribed in Britain under the name of Mandrax, a name still used to this day.

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The drug slowly made its way over to the United States in the 1960’s, where it became widely popular in the “hippie” era. In the United States, methaqualone was mainly manufactured by a pharmaceutical company in Pennsylvania who gave the drug its iconic name. The word Quaalude combines the word “quiet” with “interlude”.  During this time, doctors were essentially giving Quaaludes out like candy. People could buy “Ludes” in semi-legal stress clinics without ever having to visit with an actual doctor. By 1972, it was the sixth best-selling sedative in America. They were also widely prescribed for the treatment of insomnia and anxiety.

However, it did not take very long for the recreational abuse and addiction to follow methaqualone overseas where it was now sold in America under the brand name of Quaaludes.

How Quaaludes became so popular in the drug culture of the United States

In part due to the easy access of obtaining Quaaludes, it became very popular in night clubs and disco scenes. This earned the drug yet another popular pop culture name known as “disco-biscuits”. Due to its popularity in night clubs and disco scenes, non-alcoholic clubs known as “juice bars” were established. These clubs catered to people who wanted to dance while high on Quaaludes, or for short, “Ludes”. Moreover, in 1981 the DEA (Drug Enforcement Administration) declared Quaaludes the second most abused drug in America. So, by 1983 Quaaludes were outlawed in the United States for reasons including: widespread rates of addiction, recreational abuse and because it could potentially be used as a “date rape drug”.

With the popularity of the drug during the time it was legal in the United States, one has to wonder why so many people abused the drug. Considering how long it has remained in pop culture references during the 1960’s, up until it was banned in 1983, “Ludes” remained somewhat of an urban legend. One of the main reasons for its popularity is that Quaaludes are a very powerful barbiturate. These types of drugs act as a central nervous system depressant. Quaaludes are also highly addictive.

Some of the more noticeable side effects of Quaaludes include:

These are just a few of the side effects that come with taking Quaaludes or methaqualone. Part of the increased risk of abusing Quaaludes is that it was often consumed with other substances such as alcohol, which severely increased the risk of these negative side effects occurring.

The real danger of Quaaludes

At its peak, it was also associated with a large number of suicides, overdoses, injuries, and other dangerous incidents, like car accidents. In prescribed doses, methaqualone was known to produce relaxation, sleepiness, and a slight feeling of euphoria. But the often deadly trio of easy access, peer popularity, and consumption of alcohol lead to many overdoses and comas. The reason being that a lethal dosage of methaqualone is much smaller when combined with other substances, such as alcohol, crystal meth, or other drugs with a potential for abuse. Many people also reported using the substance because of its euphoric high and sleepy drunk effect.

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Addictive drugs often become popular in the United States

Part of the popularity of the drug was also due to its highly addictive properties. When people begin using drugs, it chemically and physically alters the functioning of the brain and its production of dopamine. Much like any other substance, with repeated use people eventually will develop tolerance to the drug. This leads them to consume more and more of the drug, in order to achieve the same desired effects. Over time, the chemicals that get released in the brain will eventually trick your brain into believing that it needs that certain substance in order to survive. This makes quitting the drug much more difficult, as the brain begins to associate different places, people, or things with the drug use.

Thankfully, psychological and medical research on addiction has come a very long way since Quaaludes were outlawed in 1983. Since then, they are nearly impossible to come by on the street, but that doesn't mean they have completely vanished. If you or a loved one may be struggling with an addiction to Quaaludes, or any other substance, then please allow our wonderfully trained staff here at More Than Rehab to help. There is absolutely no shame in asking for help when you need it! You do not have to go through your addiction alone. We understand what it takes to lead a healthy and fulfilling life without the use of drugs or alcohol, so give us a call today:

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Why Do People Get High?

In today’s crazy world it may seem like more and more people are reaching for drugs and alcohol to get high, in order to help them cope with the struggles of our "new normal". Thanks to the Coronavirus pandemic that our country is still facing, alcoholism and relapse rates are once again on the rise. Unfortunately, this is due to a multitude of different reasons like self-quarantine, isolation, boredom, change in routine and schedule, closures of local AA or NA support groups, and even having kids home full time, or being around your partner 24/7. All of these are stressful situations which could lead even the strongest willed person to have their long-lasting sobriety to come to an end.

Though COVID-19 has certainly caused a surge in relapse rates, alcoholism, and drug use, that certainly doesn’t mean that substance abuse problems weren’t a problem before 2020. In fact, it is estimated that every year, nearly 21 million Americans will suffer from a substance abuse problem of some kind. With so many people affected, it may be easy to wonder why do people get high in the first place? Well, for someone who has ever struggled with an addiction firsthand, they may know that sometimes the answer to that question is simple… But sometimes, the answer to that question is much more complicated. While we certainly cannot find one or two primary reasons people choose to get high, we can isolate some of the more common reasons people turn to drugs or alcohol.

Here are some of the most popular reasons why people, especially teens and young adults, get high:

Boredom

We are all pretty familiar with being bored, perhaps today even more so than ever before with practically everything moving online and becoming virtual. Sometimes, when a person is left to one’s own devices, it can be pretty easy to see the temptation in trying drugs or alcohol just for the sake of having something to do. That is why drugs and alcohol are so dangerous around young teens and adults because they are particularly susceptible to boredom.

Curiosity

We have all probably heard the saying, “Curiosity killed the cat” -- and while trying drugs and alcohol likely won't kill you the first time, it still most certainly could. With dangerous drugs like fentanyl being laced in some common street drugs, a drug overdose death is more likely now, than ever.

Beginning with something as simple as wanting to know what it feels like to be high or get drunk, can end up leading someone down that path of a lifetime of hurt caused by an addiction to drugs or alcohol. If curiosity ever strikes, it is best to remember that there is no way to tell who will become addicted to drugs or alcohol and that even one time could lead to an addiction.

The Desire to Belong

As humans, we all have an innate desire to fit in or belong. For teens and young adults, this is even more important. According to a recent survey, nearly 29% of teens said they had tried drugs or alcohol because their friends were also doing it. It seems that friends can play a huge role in determining whether or not a teen or young adult will eventually try drugs or alcohol for the first time. The same can be said for adults as well, something as simple as changing jobs and getting asked to go out for drinks with your new coworkers and agreeing, even though you have been sober for a year, could potentially be a huge relapse trigger for anyone.

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Peer Pressure in Social Situations

Along the same lines as the desire to belong is peer and social pressure. A lot of times people, especially teens and young adults, try drugs or alcohol for the first time because of pressure from their peers. Even though someone may initially say no to using drugs and alcohol, pressure from friends can eventually make them give in for fear of being ostracized or outcast. In turn, they may continue using drugs or alcohol even if they don't want to, simply out of the fear of rejection.

Trauma or Abuse

Any past or current trauma and/or abuse, such as a sexual assault, a car accident, childhood neglect, or emotional abuse, can lead anyone to trying drugs or alcohol. Traumatic events can imprint on the memory, making it very difficult to get past the experience. Oftentimes, people get high in an attempt to escape having to deal with the painful emotions associated with the experience.

Career Pressure

Teens and young adults are not the only age group that can fall victim to addiction from environmental pressures. For instance, career pressure can drive someone of any age to get high on drugs or alcohol. A lot of times, people tie their self-worth into their career and if they feel as though they are not living up to their potential or are struggling to meet demands they may turn to drugs and alcohol in order to make themselves feel better.

Dealing With Grief

Losing a loved one is a devastating feeling and grief is an especially painful experience. Living through a loved one’s death is an especially difficult time for people and no two people grieve the same. Unfortunately, many people who are undergoing grief may want to get high, in an attempt to forget about the loved one’s passing. However, while this is normally just a short term coping mechanism it can turn into a life-long problem for those who are not careful.

There are many other reasons why someone may want to get high from drugs or alcohol.

Usually, the reasons are psychological, mental, or physical. Some people use drugs or alcohol in an attempt to self-medicate some sort of mental illness like depression or insomnia. There is also no way to tell who will become addicted to drugs or alcohol, so it is best to try and steer clear of all illicit substances when possible.

If you, or a loved one, are having difficulty with a substance abuse disorder, then we are here to help. Reach out to us today and let our family at More Than Rehab help take care of you, or your loved one who is struggling. We have years of experience and knowledge when it comes to treating substance abuse disorders and many of our staff have been where you are before, so we know what it takes to lead a healthy and fulfilling life of sobriety! Call us anytime. We are available 24/7 and we hope to hear from you soon!

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Common Ways Addicts Store or Hide Their Drugs

Anyone who has ever known or loved an addict knows just how far they would go to continue getting high and they would also never question their ingenuity when it comes to trying to conceal or hide their drugs from others. If there is one thing in common between all people who suffer from the disease of addiction, it would certainly have to be the fact that they all lie, at least in one way or another. Many will tell you until they are blue in the face that they haven’t been using drugs or alcohol, even though they are under the influence at the same time they are telling you that.

For any parent of an addict, it can be extremely difficult to trust or believe your child when they tell you that they are no longer getting high, especially if they haven't changed any of their behaviors or actions. Perhaps you have found drugs and paraphernalia in your child’s bedroom before and insisted that they throw it out, never to be brought back in the house again.

Even though they may have the best of intentions, sometimes quitting drugs and alcohol just isn’t that easy. If you are the parent of a teen, or young adult, and have concerns that they are still abusing drugs or alcohol, then keep reading.

Here are some of the most common ways that addicts hide their drugs.

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Writing Utensils

A popular way that teens hide drugs is inside of writing utensils. While that highlighter sitting on their desk or hiding in their pencil pouch may seem harmless enough, it may be used to store pills, marijuana, or even powdered substances. Simply pop off the back and the highlighter instantaneously turns into a pipe for marijuana. There are many videos on the internet teaching teens or young adults how to do just that.

Prop Soda Bottles, Cans, or Candy Containers

A quick search on the internet will turn up tons of fake items used to conceal or hide drugs. Things like unopened soda bottles, soda cans, or candy boxes can actually be stash spots for drugs. If you see the same soda bottle all the time or the same candy wrapper, try opening it up to see what's really inside. If it is a fake item, it will usually have a place to twist open, revealing a hidden compartment.

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Belt Buckles

Who knew that belt buckles were not just for fashion anymore? Well, apparently, they are often used as a way to conceal drugs. Somehow, people have found a way to change these buckles into a secret compartment to hide their drugs. If you suspect that your child is using their belt buckle to conceal drugs, try flipping it over to see if the back slides off.

Hygiene and Makeup Supplies

That makeup bag on the floor in the bedroom, or on the counter in the bathroom, may be serving a more illicit purpose than you might originally think. A lot of make-up supplies come in a tube that can be hollowed out for drug storage. Things like lipstick, lip balm, deodorant, mascara, or hair products can be great hiding spots for people trying to conceal their drugs.

Posters, Wall Hangings, Picture Frames

Don’t let that seemingly innocent boy band poster fool you, teens or young adults have been known to flatten their drugs and hang them behind posters or other wall hangings. Picture frames also make a great spot to hide their drugs, as they can open up the back and stash them inside. Look for tape that is constantly peeling or a corner that looks like it's been folded back and forth if you suspect your child of hiding drugs.

 

Socks and Shoes

Socks and shoes are also extremely common, but not in the way you might think. While some have been known to stash drugs just inside the sock or the shoe, many also have hidden pockets that can be used to conceal drugs as well. Try looking inside the shoe to determine if there are any other areas that might be used to hide drugs. Socks can also have hidden pockets, so be sure to check those too.

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Vehicles

While not necessarily in the home, vehicles are another common way that people hide their drugs. You may be prone to searching their room, but how often are you checking their car? If you suspect your child of using drugs, it may be wise to thoroughly inspect their vehicle. Check places like behind the dashboard, under the seats, or even under the hood.

Vents and Toilets

Air vents are easy to remove and put back on, making it an ideal spot to put something that isn't meant to be discovered. Another popular place to hide drugs is underneath the toilet tank lid. Both are easy, quick, and inconspicuous options when it comes to concealing drugs. Many would not think to check in the air vent or under the toilet tank lid, which is why these are popular options. A quick look in both of these places may ease your mind if you suspect your child of hiding drugs.

Inhalers

When an item is necessary for one’s health, it tends to fall under even less suspicion. But, nevertheless, inhalers have become a popular place to hide drugs. Once the inhaler has been taken apart, it becomes a clever place to stash drugs. This is a great place to check if you are concerned about your child, especially if the inhaler doesn't belong to them.

Game Consoles or Electronics

For those who are even slightly inclined, storing drugs in game consoles or electronic devices can prove to be very easy. Loosen up a few screws here and a few screws there, then voila, a perfect hiding place for drugs. Look for signs that the electronic has been tampered with or taken apart and put back together.

These are just a few of the most common places that people may use to hide their drugs when they don’t want them to be found. If you suspect your loved one may have developed problem with drugs or alcohol, we are here to help! Our trained addiction specialists at More Than Rehab can help answer any questions you might have. We know how to treat and manage substance abuse disorders, and would love the chance to offer help for your family.

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Hygiene and Drug Use: Why Does Use Cause a Lack of Care?

For many of us, maintaining our image is a matter of importance, at least to some degree. The power of first impressions have a huge impact in our modern world. Because of this, cleanliness and personal hygiene are often taught to us early on as children. The majority of people shower on a regular basis, brush their teeth every day, wear clean clothes, and keep a tidy house. Although it is true that hygiene habits may look somewhat different, especially depending on the person, in large part, many of us take some sort of pride in our appearance. Unfortunately, substance abuse has been known to change personal hygiene habits for people who have become addicted to drugs or alcohol.

A lack of care for personal hygiene and outward appearance can be a sign of drug use.

One of the most common physical signs or symptoms that someone may be struggling from a substance abuse problem is the deterioration in one's appearance. If you have ever struggled with an addiction, or have known someone that has, you may be aware that addiction is often defined as an inability to stop using drugs or alcohol, even despite harmful consequences, and that it is caused by chemical changes to the brain. If you know someone who has recently stopped caring about their appearance, along with other concerning behavioral or physical symptoms, it may be time to reach out for help. We have many experienced professionals ready to answer any questions you might have if you suspect a loved one of needing help.

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Call us today for help with your drug or alcohol addiction. We offer the best evidence-based treatment program in the Houston, Texas area.

Why does an addiction to drugs or alcohol have such an impact on personal hygiene?

Some may wonder why many addicts seem to be affected in such a way that they stop caring about their appearance and personal hygiene? If you stopped and asked an addict on the street, I’m sure that many of their answers would be the same. Many just stop caring, their addiction takes first priority, and is often their only priority. They spend most of their time too high to take care of themselves and the rest of the time they spend trying to get more drugs and resupplying their stash.

For others, they barely even notice that they haven’t showered or brushed their teeth for days, or that the clothes they are wearing smell of vomit, or they simply haven't changed their clothes in who knows how long. Some might even tell you that they are afraid that getting in the shower will ruin their high, so they avoid doing it for days on end.

One thing is for certain though, considering all the different reasons why many addicts either chose to neglect, or give up on, their personal appearance, it is no surprise that this can have significant consequences to an addict. Combine this with poor nutrition and an improper diet, along with the toxic chemicals often found in drugs, you have a deadly recipe for a lack of hygiene and poor outward appearance. The disease of addiction is very destructive and this has been shown time and time again.

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Drug or alcohol addiction can cause significant changes to things like your skin, your teeth, your weight, the way you smell, and even your hair.

Perhaps one of the first noticeable changes that occur when an addict stops caring about their appearance is what happens to the skin. Neglect, poor hygiene, poor nutrition, and dehydration are all associated with substance abuse and can have negative impacts on the skin. Common symptoms of substance-related skin issues include:

These common effects to the skin are why many addicts, or those in early recovery from addiction can appear to be much older than they actually are.

The negative effects of addiction on oral hygiene.

Another common consequence of poor hygiene, toxic chemicals from drug use, and poor nutrition is the tooth loss that many addicts experience. Although how heavily impacted your smile may be can differ greatly, depending on the drug of choice, all of these substances have a chance to steal it. For example:

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Substance abuse can also greatly affect your hair.

Improper hygiene and poor nutrition can lead to a lack of shine, brittle hair, and inadequate new hair growth. Certain drugs can also cause temporary hair loss. Throwing in a poor diet and bad hygiene practices only accelerates this process. For others, the lack of care for their hair appears as developing huge, dreadlocked knots, as they forget to, or are unwilling to brush it. Some recovering addicts report going so far as to shave their own head instead of dealing with chunks of hair falling out or having to brush it.

Sudden or extreme weight-loss can be a sign of a substance use disorder.

Along with changes to your hair, skin, and teeth is extreme weight loss. When your only concern is how you are going to get your next high, eating becomes way less important. Many addicts will also forgo buying food even if they are hungry in order to get more drugs. Certain drugs also reduce or eliminate hunger, acting as an appetite suppressant. Oftentimes, cocaine or methamphetamine users will go days, or sometimes even weeks without eating food.

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It can be very sad when we see a loved one who is putting off their appearance, or is not taking care of themselves, because of drug abuse or drug addiction. If you, or a loved one, need help getting back on the road to a healthy, sober life, then we are here to help! We can answer any questions you may have about the recovery process and would love to teach you the tools to get back on the road to loving yourself again!

If you, or a loved one is experiencing an addiction to drugs or alcohol and you need help, call us today! We are open 24/7.

888-249-2191

Is it Easy to Buy Drugs on the Dark Web?

Most of us are aware of the illicit drug market that usually consists of players, like your local street dealers, their suppliers, and then their suppliers, eventually working all the way up, ending at whoever manufactured the product. When most people think of the drug trade, they associate it with organizations like the Mexican drug cartels or the sketchy guy people meet on the street corner downtown or in a dark alley somewhere in the bowels of a large city. What many may not know is that there is an even more illicit, and hidden way to purchase these highly dangerous and illegal drugs or substances. Something that is known as the deep net, or dark web. So, is it easy to buy drugs on the dark web?

What is the dark web, or deep net?

The dark web is a secret not known to many, especially to those who never go looking, and to those who are aware of its existence, know it to be extremely hidden. It is actually designed to be intentionally difficult to access and navigate. Essentially, the dark web is a part of the internet that is not indexed by search engines. Its anonymous nature, means that it cannot be found by searching in places like Google, or by stumbling upon it accidentally.

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It is estimated that nearly 96% of the internet is inaccessible by search engines and the general public. To access the deep net, certain types of software are usually required. A major component in being able to access the dark web is by having a specific web browser that allows you to do so. With the exception of computer hackers or cybersecurity experts, it’s pretty safe to say that most people have never even heard of the browser. (Hint: it’s not Firefox, Google Chrome or Microsoft Edge).

Why is buying drugs on the dark web so dangerous?

Some people might assume that buying drugs on the dark web is safer because of its perceived anonymity, but that isn't necessarily true. The mere fact that most people are unable to access the dark web, especially without some sort of insider knowledge, shows just how difficult it could be for the average joe to purchase illicit drugs using it. However, many tech-savvy people, say, college students for instance, are seeking out a variety of substances on the dark web, from ecstasy, heroin, cocaine, date rape drugs like GHB or Quaaludes, to bootlegged prescription painkillers, and even nootropics like Adderall or Modafinil.

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There are many reasons why the deep net marketplace makes it more difficult to purchase drugs. Typically, the dark net is more expensive than your local street-corner drug dealer. It can also be riskier to the buyer, you may get ripped off, or you may get a drug laced with another drug that could kill you. You may have ordered Adderall, but what you get could be methamphetamine or something entirely different. Many of the substances on the dark web have been laced with fentanyl, whether intentional, or not.

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However, experts have seen a recent uptick in people using the dark web, as the Coronavirus has swept across the globe. COVID-19 has certainly made it more difficult for some regular users to obtain the drugs they are addicted to. Manufacturing, supply chains and local dealer’s supplies have all been disrupted to some extent, due to the pandemic.

Buying drugs on the dark web is expensive, complicated and inherently risky.

While it is more difficult to access, the dark web is a haven for some drug dealers as the prices for their drugs are also more expensive. Considering the dealers seem to be assuming less risk, it is a surprise that they are able to charge more for their illegal, and oftentimes harmful, products. Not to mention, having to pay for shipping and handling. Though this may not be a problem for the addict with tons of cash flow, that is not ordinarily the case. For the majority of users, the dark web is often highly unaffordable. So, even if they were to somehow gain access in order to buy them, they most likely would be deterred because it typically costs much more than just meeting your dealer on the street.

Another reason why getting drugs on the dark web is more difficult, or less appealing to the buyer, is having to wait for the product to come in the mail. Although some users may have to wait a couple hours for their normal dealer to answer the phone, or show up at the meeting spot, waiting for drugs purchased on the dark web could take weeks, that is, if they ever come. This could be a major problem for someone looking to get a quick fix, while avoiding withdrawal symptoms.

Many people who use drugs regularly do not think that far ahead, especially in terms of how long their stash is going to last. The majority of people who are actively using drugs need to resupply daily and do not want to go through the hassle of having to wait for a package in the mail.

Buying illegal drugs on the internet can get you arrested.

Additionally, when a person buys drugs off of the dark web, they are also assuming all of the risks of federal drug trafficking charges. For many unsuspecting buyers, the DEA (Drug Enforcement Agency) has been known to show up at their door instead of the package they were waiting for. The majority, if not all, of law enforcement agencies are aware of the illegal drug trade conducted on the deep net. For any suspicious packages being shipped overseas or across state borders, there is a high probability that they will be inspected. Drugs purchased from the dark web are often discovered during the transportation process. Getting caught shipping drugs is a federal crime and you could easily be charged with a felony.

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You never know what you’ll get when buying drugs on the dark web.

On top of being riskier and more expensive, buying drugs on the darkweb also increases the unpredictability of the product, making it more dangerous to one's health. When someone buys drugs off of the internet there is no way to guarantee on the strength of the actual product, or the ingredients used to manufacture it. People who sell drugs over the internet have a much broader market and do not have to meet face-to-face. The anonymity of the dark net causes dealers to care less about their reputation and the quality of their products. A local dealer has an image they need to maintain if they want to continue having clients. If word ever got out on the street that they were selling “wack” product, the majority of their business would be lost.

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As you can see, there are a number of reasons why buying drugs on the dark web is not a good idea for your personal, financial and legal safety. The best route possible would be not buying drugs at all and getting help for your addiction, if you need it. If you, or a loved one, are having difficulties staying sober, or you suspect there is a substance abuse problem, please do not hesitate to reach out to one of our addiction specialists today. Instead of trying to find a new way to buy drugs, we urge you to consider taking back control over your life.

Here at More Than Rehab, we understand what it takes to lead a happy and successful life of sobriety, through an evidence-based approach to addiction treatment. We are always here to help, 24/7. Give us a call!

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Colleges and Drugs: What are the Popular Drugs to Look Out for in 2020?

For those who have been lucky enough to attend college, they know that it can be a very exciting experience. For some, the experience is mainly focused around the academic aspect and the desire to further their education. For others, while academia may still be a factor, the experience is more about what college itself has to offer; individual freedom, and the chance to make decisions without constant parental guidance, the opportunity to expand one’s social circle, and it is often a setting where experimentation with drugs or alcohol is common for a variety of different reasons, either for fun, to celebrate, for social reasons, or perhaps even to deal with the stress. Whatever the reason may be, it is no secret that for the majority of college students, college experience tends to be a place for experimentation, especially when it comes to alcohol and drugs.

What kinds of drugs do college students typically use on Texas campuses?

A recent study found that nearly 23 percent of college students reported using an illicit drug sometime within the past 30 days and more than 75 percent say it is very easy to buy drugs on campus. While this has always been an issue, it may be of even more concern today. In the year of 2020, as the coronavirus, the pandemic  also commonly known as covid-19, has caused a shift in the way college campuses are currently being operated. With classes being shut down and having been moved to only online, students are finding themselves with more free time than ever. However, it is unclear how this may impact data as far as drug use among college students is concerned, but young adults will likely continue to seek-out and use drugs.

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Here are some of the most popular drugs on college campuses to look out for in the United States during the year of 2020:

Alcohol

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism reports that alcohol is the substance that most people abuse in college, with 4 out of 5 college students drinking alcohol. To make matters worse, the majority of the college population are between the ages of 18 to 22, where 21 is the legal drinking age. More so, around half of the college students who drink also participate in binge drinking, which is where they consume four or more alcoholic beverages per hour.

Cocaine

Although the use of cocaine peaked around the mid 1980’s, it is still commonly found on college campuses. Cocaine is a highly addictive and illegal stimulant. College students reportedly use the drug at parties and clubs. While it is sometimes used by itself, the majority of college students say they combine it with other drugs like alcohol and marijuana at social gatherings. One study showed that 69 percent of users reported abusing the drug after entry into college.

Adderall and Ritalin

Adderall and Ritalin are both prescription medications often used for the treatment of ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) and ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). They have become the “study drug” of choice as both are known to have stimulating properties. College students are twice as likely to abuse prescription stimulants due to related workload stress. According to the 2017 results from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, around 60% of young adults used prescription stimulants obtained from friends for non-medical purposes.

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Marijuana or Synthetic Marijuana

Some other commonly abused drugs by college students are marijuana and synthetic marijuana. Many students report using these substances in order to relieve the stress associated with college life. It is often abused at parties or other social events. It is estimated that nearly 38 percent of college students use marijuana, according to Monitoring the Future, a survey that is used to measure adolescent drug and alcohol activity. Synthetic marijuana is also a commonly used substance among college students who want to achieve the same effects as marijuana without the legal risk, as synthetic marijuana strains are made in order to circumvent detection from law enforcement agencies.

 

Xanax & Benzodiazepines

Xanax, also known as alprazolam, is a benzodiazepine commonly prescribed for the treatment of anxiety. Since it is widely prescribed and widely used, it has become easily obtainable through illicit channels. College students are more likely to abuse anti-anxiety medications to deal with stress from college life. It is also commonly combined with other substances such as alcohol, or barbiturates and has been known to cause blackouts, leading to its us as a date-rape drug on college campuses as well.

 

Psychedelics

Psychedelics, such as mushrooms, LSD, or acid, are another group of substances that are commonly abused by people attending college. Psychedelics are hallucinogens, and can cause extreme hallucinations, leading people to lose their sense of reality. The effects of psychedelics are often unpredictable, and can last anywhere from 2-48 hours. This combination can cause people to act erratically, resulting in things like paranoia and psychosis. Use among college students is popular as the report trying to escape from their everyday life, which can oftentimes be stressful.

 

Ecstasy

Along with the rise of raves and EDM culture, is the use of ecstasy, or “molly” among college kids. In part due to the increased popularity of the rave culture is the increased use of ecstasy, or other MDMA related drugs, among college students. Many report using the drug where alcohol is common, such as at parties, bars, festivals, and raves. The euphoric feeling often associated with the substance is what leads students to using it in social settings. However, it can result in things like paranoia, dehydration, and it can even turn fatal in certain situations.

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Drug use among college students is not a new problem.

These are just a few of the most commonly abused drugs by college students in Texas. Due to things like social experimentation, peer pressure, stress and childhood trauma, many college students turn to drugs or alcohol. If you or someone you know may be struggling with a substance use disorder, please do not hesitate to reach out for help! Many have been where you are before and they have gotten the help necessary to get back on track. College is a very rewarding experience, but we also know that it can be very stressful. There is no shame in asking for help! Call us anytime. We are here to help you.

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Nootropics: A Dangerous New Addiction

Alcohol and addictive substances, such as heroin, methamphetamines, and cocaine, have long been a problem here in the United States. A new class of drug, termed: nootropics is adding to those problems. Today, it is estimated that nearly 21 million Americans struggle with a substance abuse problem of some kind. A person struggling with an addiction to alcohol or drugs was once considered to lack moral fortitude, but now, with a deeper understanding of addiction, doctors and scientists alike now profile addiction as a disease of the brain. Addiction literally causes changes to the functioning of an addicts brain, and sometimes these changes are even permanent.

An addiction to drugs or alcohol means when a person is unable to stop using these mind altering substances even though they usually have experienced some extreme, and often negative, consequences because of their substance abuse problem. This could be anything like going to jail, losing a job, spending all their time and money drinking alcohol or using drugs, not seeing their family, living on the streets, etc. The problem with addiction is that oftentimes it is really hard to stop abusing these substances without the help of a professional or some other type of interference, such as an overdose or a rock bottom experience.

While the use of alcohol and illegal illicit drugs, like marijuana or crack cocaine, have all been around for some time now, there is now a newer category of drugs that have been slowly sweeping across the nation. Unfortunately, not all commonly abused substances are illegal. Like alcohol, things like prescription drugs and over the counter medications are also commonly abused by members of the population. This new class of drugs are referred to as “nootropics”, which can literally be translated from the Greek words meaning mind and bending.

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"Smart drugs" or "cognitive enhancers" are substances that people take to improve an area of brain function.

Nootropics can be illegal substances, prescription drugs, and even over the counter medications. Nootropics are drugs used to improve cognitive brain functions, such as:

The first nootropic was discovered by Romanian scientist Corneliu Giurgea in the 1960s. Named Piracetam, the drug was first intended to lull patients into a gentle slumber, but they quickly realized it had the opposite effects. Patients also reported that it let to substantial improvement to their memories. While the drug is not approved by the FDA (the Food and Drug Administration), it is a prescription drug available in the UK and it is still widely used by students and young professionals alike, despite there being any scientific evidence to support their claims of cognitive improvement.

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According to a study that was recently conducted, there is evidence to suggest that nearly 30% of people living in the United States have used a nootropic at least once in the past year. If you have ever seen the movie “Limitless”, a movie that was produced in 2011 where the main character was introduced to a nootropic drug called NZT-48, then you may be familiar with the phenomena of this newly spreading craze. During the movie, NZT-48 allows him to access and fully utilize all areas of his brain, leading to substantial improvement in his life and career, but by the end of the movie it is clear that the drug also has very harmful side-effects, including dependence and addiction.

Nootropics can be very addictive.

It is true that not all nootropic drugs are considered to be dangerous, but there are still those who have very serious side effects. Part of what makes these drugs so compelling is that they are usually medically prescribed or available for purchase over the counter, so people associate them with having less risk. Another component that increases the danger level of these drugs is what is known as increased tolerance, sometimes the user needs more and more to achieve the desired effect, this can cause them to use more of the same drug, or turn to other more harmful drugs instead. Some of the most dangerous and addictive nootropic drugs are listed as follows;

It is important to note that none of these drugs have ever been shown to increase cognitive abilities, and they have had the most positive impact on someone who already had cognitive impairment problems to begin with.

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However, as I mentioned earlier there are some natural substances known to have nootropic effects with little to no side effects. So, if you must, and you are feeling like you may need a little cognitive enhancement, try drinking the age old cup of coffee for that natural boost. Caffeine has been shown to have a positive effect with a low risk of dependence. Other over the counter substances like L-theanine or ginkgo biloba have also had positive effects reported by users, and they also carry a low risk of dependency. As always, speak with a medical professional before trying any of these safer alternatives as they may react with other medications. As always, if you believe that you or a loved one have developed a dependence on any type of substance, do not worry! We are here to help, do not hesitate to ask!

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Drug Usage Can Be Driven By Childhood Trauma

A common question in today’s world is what drives abuse of drugs and alcohol? While the answer to that isn’t exactly a 'one fits all' model, there are many things that can potentially lead to whether or not someone will become an addicted person later on in life. This can include things like genetic predisposition, how old a person is the first time they try drugs or alcohol, peer pressure, their success in school, how stable their home environment is and influence of family members. Of course, this is not an all-inclusive list of what eventually leads an addict to develop an addiction. Research suggests that childhood trauma can also have a significant impact on the likelihood of someone developing an addiction.

Addiction has become an overwhelming epidemic in our society as accessibility and acceptability have increased drug usage across the country. Today, in the United States alone, more than 23.5 million people are afflicted with this disease that changes the brain of the user over time. Often times surrounding it is the stigma or idea that addicts are somehow less capable, weak minded or criminalistic. The doctors and researchers who focus on this subject have found that that is just completely not true.

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Sadly, statistics show that one in every six boys and one in every four girls will be sexually abused by their 18th birthday. The non-profit organization RAINN (Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network) reports that every 8 minutes government officials respond to a report of child sexual abuse. Additionally, the National Institute of Health (NIH) states that one third of children with a report of child abuse or neglect will have a substance abuse problem by their 18th birthday. Furthermore, according to the American Psychological Association (APA), nearly 55 to 60 percent of people who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) also have a substance abuse disorder of some kind.

What is Trauma?

The term trauma can be defined as an adverse and often malignant reaction to a singular or repetitive event that caused severe physical or psychological harm. It is characterized by a patient's inability to move past and process the experience without reliving it over and over again. Any type of dramatic event early on in life can be traumatic, such as;

Trauma of any kind can eventually lead someone to an addiction, especially those who develop a mental health disorder because of the traumatic event(s). Many trauma survivors will turn to drugs and alcohol to help cope with their feelings and any sort of mental health problems they may have because of their past traumatic experiences.

Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Trauma

While living with trauma can be different for everyone, there are some clear signs you can look out for if you think you or someone you know may be suffering from their traumatic experiences.

Keep in mind, this is not a complete list of signs or symptoms. If you believe you or someone else you know may be suffering trauma, do not hesitate to ask for help from a professional today!

How Childhood Trauma Impacts the Brain

Childhood trauma has become increasingly associated with addiction later on in life and can have a severe impact on brain development. According to statistical data, 37 percent of women currently in prison report abuse as a child while 14 percent of all men currently in prison report childhood abuse, but it is commonly supported that men are less likely to admit to others when they have been abused. Furthermore, research suggests that more than two-thirds of people in treatment for drug abuse report being abused or neglected as a child. It is important to understand the effects of trauma on the brain during early development in order to understand the powerful connection between addiction and childhood trauma.

The brains of children are literally shaped by traumatic experiences, which can lead to not only problems with addiction but with anger and criminal activity, along with many others as well. Early in life, the human brain is a social organ, hence the term “monkey see, monkey do”. It is shaped by experience, and if one grows up in a state of terror, the brain is wired to be on alert for danger and to make those feelings go away. The negative experience(s) teaches their brain to operate out of a state of fear and anxiety.

Additionally, scientists have discovered that there are also physical changes that can occur with childhood trauma. Brain imaging has shown that the part of the brain that is responsible for processing and emotional regulation changes in size with childhood trauma victims. This can also have an effect on memory and learning. The brain’s inner connections, the brain shape, and its size can all be influenced by the long term stress or abuse of a child.

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Reasons Why Trauma Victims Use Drugs

Aside from the change in the development of the brain, there are several reasons why trauma victims may decide to being using drugs or alcohol, research has shown that these are a few of the most common reasons;

Early childhood trauma is not something that should be taken lightly and we sincerely apologize for any trauma that you or your loved one may be suffering from. If you are experiencing any symptoms of trauma, or are struggling with an addiction, then have we experienced professionals who are trained specifically to understand and help treat victims of trauma or those struggling with an addiction. Call us today, we care about your recovery!

(888) 241-2191

Why is Meth so Hard to Quit?

Methamphetamine, speed, ice, or crystal meth is hard to quit simply because it is one of the most addictive drugs known to exist. In the 1990’s and early 2000’s methamphetamine was a major problem in Texas and across the whole nation because the ingredients were relatively easy to obtain at your local, street corner drug stores. The availability of ephedrine and other cold medications used to manufacture meth was at a high point. Then, between 2005-2006, the United States Federal Government began regulating the cold medicines used to manufacture meth. This created a decrease in meth production, coupled with a decrease in social indicators of misuse and abuse for the drug.

This decline in drug abuse indicators for meth continued until fairly recently. Methamphetamine has made quite the comeback, especially in southern and western states, partially due to the influence of the Mexican drug cartels. This new methamphetamine epidemic has been overshadowed by the constant media headlines of the opioid epidemic. While many politicians, governing agencies and the news media are focused on heroin and prescription pain killer overdose deaths, meth is silently killing thousands of Americans every year. Sadly, it appears only to be getting worse.

Methamphetamine is incredibly addictive, which makes meth hard to quit.

With the US crackdown on meth labs in the early 2000’s, we have a new precursor to methamphetamine manufacture known as phenyl-2-propanoe (P2P). This is what the Mexican drug cartels use in meth production that makes their versions so much more potent. The increase in meth potency from south of the border also makes the substance much, much more addictive. The intoxicating effects of Mexican meth is far greater that what we saw just a decade ago coming from American meth labs. The potency alone contributes to substance abuse and addiction at a far higher rate than we’ve seen in the past.

In Houston, Texas, the presence of methamphetamine is at an all time high, according to the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). Meth lab seizures in Texas are virtually non-existent, however as the majority of the drug seizures in the United States can be traced back to Mexico. Meth from Mexico is typically transported to the US in liquid form. The liquid methamphetamine is smuggled into the US in modified gas tanks. This liquid meth is then converted into its typical crystal form at conversion labs here in the US. This is commonly a much more potent form of the drug than we’ve seen in the past. Lab testing in 2007 showed an average meth purity level of 39 percent. Today, meth found on the streets in the US typically tests around a level of 93 percent purity.

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The greater availability and increased potency of meth, means more abuse and more drug overdoses.

Stimulant overdoses from cocaine and meth are the leading cause of drug overdose deaths in the state of Texas. Fentanyl overdose deaths are also spiking currently and many attribute this to the increase in stimulant overdoses. This is somewhat ironic, as fentanyl is a synthetic opioid, which is quite the opposite of a stimulant. However, drug dealers in Texas will order the drug from China and mix it in with their supply of cocaine, methamphetamine or counterfeit prescription pills. No one is completely certain as to why drug dealers mix fentanyl with drugs that are supposed to have the exact opposite effect, but it may be to increase the perceived potency of their drugs, or it might even be entirely accidental. Some drug labs or pill mills (which Houston is notoriously known for), may manufacture or cut different drugs with the same lab equipment, which can lead to unintentional cross-contamination of drugs. Fentanyl is so deadly that just a dose the size of 3 grains of salt is enough to kill an average human being.

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Many who abuse methamphetamine are also known to use other substances as well. The Chicago Tribune recently ran a story about dual addiction, titled: “Meth in the morning, heroin at night”. Across the nation, meth use is on the rise and many experts are saying the opioid epidemic has given crystal meth a resurgence. Opioid users who admit to using meth as well has gone up from 19% in 2011 to 34% in 2018. This evidence suggests that as doctors began to cut back on writing prescriptions for opioids, that many users began to seek street drugs like meth and heroin.

For others, methamphetamine and opioids can offer a type of synergistic high. The two types of drugs in combination can sort of balance each other out, making it seem that the user is able to function normally. In the past, the term “speedball” (which was a mix of heroin and cocaine) was used to describe the balancing of two, seemingly opposite drugs. This combination has been deadly, killing many people, including notable celebrities such as: John Belushi, Chris Farley, Ken Caminiti, Mitch Hedberg, Chris Kelly and Phillip Seymour Hoffman.

In theory, the meth combats the opioid’s drowsiness, while the opioid balances out the erratic, spastic “tweakiness” of the methamphetamine. Many people who abuse any type of drug end up “chasing the dragon” trying to feel “normal” again. For some people, their “normal” is constantly changing. This happens as their body’s tolerance to the drugs they’re using fluctuates, or the potency or types of drugs they are currently using can change rapidly as well. This is a dangerous balancing act, one that has led many people to dangerous and deadly consequences.

Meth is a drug that is very hard to quit. The crisis at the US-Mexico border has helped create a meth-overdose epidemic.                  

While the opioid crisis appears to be slowing-down, a new meth-fueled crisis is poised to take its place. It is estimated that 774,000 Americans used methamphetamine in 2017. When US lawmakers cracked-down on the manufacture of meth in the mid-2000’s, it worked. That is, until the Mexican drug cartels filled-in the gap. Now meth is available in virtually every community across the United States. While it is extremely important to keep focusing efforts on combating the opioid epidemic, we should be looking at ways to help people who need treatment for an addiction. This act alone would cut down on the demand for these dangerous drugs, which is the first step towards truly combating the problem.

If you or someone you know needs help with a substance abuse problem, please don’t hesitate to call us at More Than Rehab. We are available 24/7 to help or your loved one create the foundation to live a better life. We offer the best in evidence-based addiction treatment in the greater Houston area. Please don’t wait any longer, call us right away:

(888) 249-2191

What is the Best Drug Rehabilitation?

Finding the best addiction treatment program for yourself or a loved one can be a confusing process for many. With so many treatment options available, it is difficult for some to find the best drug rehabilitation program that will suit their individual needs. Finding the best drug rehabilitation for your addiction can be one of the most important health care decisions you make in your entire life. Addiction to drugs or alcohol can quickly become a deadly disease. You have a lot of options available to help you, but we want you to make an informed decision on which program will offer the best care for yourself or a loved one.  

What are the different drug rehabilitation treatment types available to cure addiction?

Drug and alcohol medical detox

For most people, a full medical detox will be the first step of their alcohol or drug rehabilitation program. Before your treatment begins, you want to make sure your body and mind are prepared for the often intense withdrawal symptoms you may experience when you first stop using drugs or alcohol. This is why rehab programs will require you to complete a full detox before you begin your stay at a residential drug rehab facility.

Going through a full detox will rid your body of harmful toxins that were built up from past drug and alcohol abuse. The detox will help you get beyond the physical challenges of addiction, such as acute withdrawal symptoms, before you begin to address the mental and behavioral components of your addiction.

Physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms happen for most people when they first stop using drugs or alcohol. Many of these withdrawal symptoms can be eased with the help of Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT), beginning in the detox phase. These medications are designed to immediately make you feel more comfortable, while reducing your cravings for alcohol and drugs. MATs are considered to be science-driven, evidence based treatments, as they can also help prevent a relapse later on in your recovery from addiction.

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Inpatient alcohol and drug rehabilitation

Ongoing treatment is essential beyond an initial detox when a lifetime of sobriety is your ultimate goal. Entering an inpatient drug rehab facility will help you work through the psychological and emotional problems that contributed to your substance use disorder. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), individual and group counseling, 12 step programs, physical activities, family counseling and a variety of other techniques are employed to varying degrees in nearly every inpatient addiction treatment program. Some inpatient drug rehab programs last an average of 30 days, while others go up to 90 days or more, depending on the severity of the addiction. Some research has shown that the longer a person stays in a treatment program, the more positive the results will be:

"However, research has shown unequivocally that good outcomes are contingent on adequate treatment length. Generally, for residential or outpatient treatment, participation for less than 90 days is of limited effectiveness, and treatment lasting significantly longer is recommended for maintaining positive outcomes.

NIDA (National Institute on Drug Abuse)
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Inpatient drug rehab programs offer a comfortable group housing arrangement for others who are in similar stages of recovery. These settings are a good start for many people who just recently quit using drugs or alcohol. Inpatient rehab offers the patient a chance to get out of their daily routine, and really focus on the most important thing for their personal health: learning how to stay sober.

Inpatient rehab is absolutely essential when someone has an addiction to multiple substances or an underlying mental health issue that may have contributed to their substance use disorder. When someone has past trauma, it is likely this had heavily contributed to the reasons the addiction developed in the first place. Many have suffered from an undiagnosed mental illness that caused them to self-medicate in an attempt to feel “normal”. This is referred to as a dual diagnosis, and will require more intricate treatment techniques.  

Outpatient drug and alcohol rehabilitation

Outpatient rehab offers most of the same forms of treatment as an inpatient facility does, but it allows the flexibility for someone to get treatment for their addiction, while continuing to live at home, go to work or attend school while in rehab. This being the case, it is important to find an outpatient clinic near you.

Most outpatient clinics offer daily individual, group and family therapy sessions, coupled with various other forms of treatment. In many ways, outpatient care is no different from inpatient treatment, you just don’t live at the rehab facility. Typically, most would recommend an outpatient treatment facility to someone who has already completed 30 to 90 days of inpatient rehab.

Outpatient facilities offer patients the opportunity to extend the length of their treatment, while providing a continued foundation for their success in sobriety. Outpatient rehabilitation is also a great way to learn techniques to reduce cravings and prevent a relapse while having the chance to test them out in real world situations. Remember that sticking with a long-term strategy while in recovery is the key to achieving positive outcomes in your addiction treatment.

While the differences between inpatient and outpatient treatment are fairly straightforward, the differences in results will be determined by the individual needs of the patient. The goal of all of these programs is ultimately to help you build a new lifestyle that doesn’t include the use of alcohol or drugs.

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Finding the best drug rehabilitation in the Houston, Texas area

A long term substance abuse problem can have devastating consequences not only for yourself, but for your friends and family members as well. It is never too late to start an addiction recovery program but the sooner you act, the easier it will be. When an addiction goes untreated, the addict is prone to worsening health conditions and at a great risk for an accidental overdose death.

Every 11 minutes, someone dies from an opioid overdose in the United States. As the opioid epidemic rages on, the lives of many Americans are at stake. If you’re reading this, odds are this epidemic has hit close to home for you as well. Know that immediate help is available. At More Than Rehab, we are available to help you 24/7. All you have to do is pick up the phone and make that first call:

888-249-2191