Can Delta-8 THC Cause Harm to the Body?

The popularity of Delta-8 THC has been rising in the past few years. According to Headset, the sale of delta-8 grew by 144% between April 2020 and April 2021. However, just like any other new product in the market, actual and potential users of Delta-8 products are anxious. They want clarity on whether the products are safe for their consumption or not. This blog post will dig deeper into the Delta-8 THC safety profile and effects of THC.

What is Delta-8 THC?

Delta-8 is a type of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that occurs in small amounts in the Cannabis sativa plant. This compound has some properties similar to those found in delta-9 THC, an active constituent of marijuana. However, those who use delta-8 THC do not get the psychoactive effects as experienced by consumers of delta-9 THC. The high concentration of THC in delta-9 is what makes its users experience a high feeling.

Delta-8 THC commonly exists inform of:

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Is Delta-8 THC Dangerous?

There are no sufficient studies to evaluate the impact of Delta-8 THC consumption on human beings. Thus, there is no proof that the use of this substance has any potential benefits or medicinal value to its users. The reports circulating on social media posts regarding its potential benefits can be misleading.

Most Delta-8 THC products vendors trade these products outside the state-controlled cannabis industries. Since they are operating in an unregulated environment, nothing stops the producers from making toxic products. If no action is taken to control the production and consumption of this substance, it may present a public health risk

Other reasons why Delta-8 THC is dangerous for human consumption include:

Medical experts continue to discourage the consumption of this variant form of THC. The uncontrolled market of delta-8 products qualifies it to be categorized as a dangerous substance to purchase. 

Is Delta-8 THC Legal?

Delta-8 THC is federally legal across different states in the U.S. through a loophole created by the 2018 Farm Bill. The bill legalized hemp because of its low concentration of THC. The legalization made hemp products such as Delta-8 THC legal to be sold and consumed on a federal level.

However, the lack of research on the effects of Delta-8 THC on human consumption has made 14 states illegalize the sale and consumption of this compound. These states include; Alaska, Arizona, Delaware, and Utah. Other states like Michigan, North Carolina, and Virginia have cautioned the public about using the compound.

What are the Effects of THC?

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, smoking marijuana with THC as an active element can have immediate side effects. However, these effects may vary from one person to another. They may also depend on how one consumes the substance containing THC. The common side effects include:

Since delta-8 has certain percentages of THC, consuming it may also result in similar side effects as those listed above. Users of these products have reported other effects such as:

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The absence of research data on the adverse effects of delta-8 does not mean the substance doesn’t have serious side effects. In 2020, the Poison Control Center in North Carolina recorded about 109 cases of individuals recording severe reactions to delta-8. 

Delta-8 products packed as fruit-flavored can be tempting to kids who like confectioneries. If you have toddlers in your home, keep any of your cannabis products away from them. 

Factors to Consider Before Buying Delta-8 THC

Before buying delta-8 from any vendor, this is what you need to know.

  1. FDA has not approved any delta-8 product as a safe substance for human consumption. 
  2. FDA has received reports on severe negative effects surrounding the use of delta-8 products. The effects include loss of consciousness and trouble in standing. 
  3. The process of extracting and making concentrates of delta-8 THC uses harmful chemicals, sometimes traced back to the delta-8 products.
  4. Delta-8 THC products have psychoactive and intoxicating effects.
  5. If you have to buy them, ensure you are sourcing them from a licensed vendor, and you should keep them out of reach of children. 

Just because THC products are legal in different states, it does not mean they are safe for consumption. Delta 8 THC and other forms of THC are dangerous and can become addictive when used uncontrollably. If anyone around you is already struggling to free themselves from the consumption of THC products, reach out to us for help. 

Isolation can Lead to Addiction

Addiction is a complex condition that can rarely be attributed to a single cause. One’s environment, genetics, mental health, and past experiences all influence the development of addiction. Studies also point out isolation as a vulnerability to drug addiction.  

Social isolation isn’t necessarily bad: we all crave some alone time, at least occasionally. Being alone can be rejuvenating, meditative, and relaxing. But when the solitude is unwanted or unhealthy, it can become problematic. Isolation has become a growing concern for the health care system.

People who are socially isolated may lack friends, family, or close workmates. So, they tend to feel lonely and depressed. As a result, they may suffer from anxiety, low self-esteem, and other mental health issues, as you’ll notice in this article.

What is social isolation?

As the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put it, social isolation is the lack of social connections that can lead to loneliness in some people. Those in unhealthy isolation are likely to:

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In some cases, the isolation can include emotional isolation where one is unwilling or unable to share their feelings with others. When this happens, the person can become emotionally numb.

What causes social isolation?

Isolation can be a result of many factors, including:

The effects of isolation

Many studies have shown a connection between isolation and physical health issues. Isolation is a risk factor for issues like heart disease, increased inflammation and stress hormones, diabetes 2, and even disability. An analysis of 70 studies and 3.4 million people pointed out that isolated individuals had a 30% higher risk of dying in the next seven years.

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But the effects of isolation aren’t just physical. They can be mental as well. In fact, numerous studies show a close link between isolation and mental disorders like low self-esteem, depression, social anxiety, dementia, or other mental health concern.

Again, isolation and mental issues tend to feed off of each other. Meaning, an individual might develop anxiety because of isolation, then feel more isolated because of their anxiety, and vice versa.

How isolation leads to addiction

Connecting with other people is an important part of well-being. Humans are social creatures, and not getting enough social interaction can impact health. Isolation can increase the amount of stress hormone cortisol in the body, causing a range of physical health concerns.

Prolonged isolation can lead to mental health issues or worsen the existing ones. When feelings of loneliness go unresolved, it could lead to a range of mental illnesses.

Many studies show a strong connection between mental health disorders and substance use disorders. In fact, as the National Institute on Drug Use puts it, many people who develop mental illnesses are also diagnosed with substance use disorder. Data show high rates of SUD and mental disorders like anxiety, depression, PTSD, and antisocial personality disorders, all of which are common among those who self-isolate. NIDA also points out that people with personality, substance use, and mental disorders were more likely to use non-medical prescription opioids

Isolation may also cause loneliness. When a person is lonely, they may turn to drugs to pass the time or shut down the critical inner voices that tend to multiply in isolation. Speaking of voices, too much isolation leads to fluctuations in thinking, causing one to perceive the world around them negatively. In some cases, the loneliness can make them a little vulnerable, causing them to start looking for reasons people aren’t hanging out with them.

At this point, self-disgust sets in to offer a handy scapegoat. When one fixates on these beliefs and thoughts, they might act in ways to reinforce their actions. They may also abuse substances to cope with their situation or avoid reality. Prolonged use might lead to addiction, driving one further into isolation.

Note that both drugs and social interaction can stimulate one’s dopamine response. Emotional and physical connectedness triggers the production of good feelings, and when that system doesn’t change, one may seek to self-medicate. So they’ll turn to illegal drugs, prescription drugs, or alcohol. For those struggling with addiction, this can make for a deadly mix under the wrong circumstances.

Unfortunately, at this point, any attempt to stop using ends in withdrawal symptoms. So, one is likely to struggle alone, with no end in sight.

How to overcome isolation

Going out more and making new friends might seem like an obvious thing to do in this case. However, isolation can have an underlying cause that needs to be addressed to build more fulfilling connections. Treatment programs exist to help individuals gain control of their lives. But one can also try out the following:

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How to prevent relapse in isolation

Those who go through substance abuse treatment need physical, emotional, and financial support from their loved ones to regain full control of their lives. Otherwise, they risk relapsing. Finding support in groups like Alcoholic Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous can help prevent relapse.

Getting help for social isolation and addiction

The risks of drug addiction are higher among those suffering from isolation. But the good news is that there are facilities that provide medically-reviewed addiction treatment and therapies to help one reopen communication lines and feel less isolated.

What is A Wook? (And Other Drug User Terms)

People use a myriad of names to refer to drugs and alcohol. Some of these names are common, while others are only specific to certain groups. Usually, the more popular the substance, the more slang is associated with it. One popular term these days is "wook" and it's not at all like the Wookiee from Star Wars.

Slang terms come by as a way to communicate in-group, and in the case of substances, they may be for secrecy. People who abuse drugs or alcohol don’t always want their friends or family members to know. They also don’t want to be obvious when in public.

So, they’ll use slang names so that others won’t understand. Slang terms can range from derogatory names such as junkie or doper to nicer ones like a flower child. Some of the terms' meanings hint at what society thinks about drugs. 

Read on to find out what is a wook and other common slang words:

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A Wook

Wooks are people who abuse psychedelic drugs such as LSD, psilocybin mushrooms, DMT, ketamine, ecstasy pills, 2CI (a type of hallucinogenic drug), and PCP. 

A wook depends on drugs, and they're usually so intoxicated that they rely on others for survival. Wooks don't have any ambition or motivation in life other than to get high. Because wooks are often addicted to drugs, they mostly need specialized addiction treatment, sometimes more than one type. 

You can quickly spot a wook by the way they dress. Outwardly, they adorn hippyish clothes, long and untidy deadlocks, and a general counterculture fashion. Wooks also borrow anything they can think of, including money, but they can't hold down a job because they're constantly under the influence. You'll find them at the store trying to trade in a tube of toothpaste for something they like better.

A wook will do anything to get money from you - including lying. They'll come up with lies to justify what they want. Their self-entitlement nature makes them take things from other people even when it means stealing. Wooks are always broke and unable to pay back their debts, so they make promises that they fail to keep. 

A Dopehead

Dopeheads are people who live for drugs, and everything revolves around getting high. They depend on drugs to feel good about themselves, whether through smoking pot or snorting cocaine. Dopeheads are usually:

Dopeheads are not just people addicted to heroin but also meth, marijuana, and cocaine. They also tend to have a myriad of health problems - including mental health issues.

A Beatnik

Beatniks were the first generation of counterculture Americans who used drugs to rebel against mainstream society. They believed in authenticity through drug use and felt they were free from the standard rules in life. Most beatniks were intellectuals with a poetic spirit who knew how to express their rebelliousness through their words and music.

Many beatniks abused drugs such as marijuana and heroin, but in time, other drugs such as amphetamines also became popular in beatnik circles. 

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Hippies

The word hippie was derived in the 1960s, and it depicted a person who rejected conventional values, abused alcohol or drugs, had long hair and wore bright-colored clothes.

Hippies were more concerned with quick self-satisfaction rather than making money or following a career path. They lived in communities where addiction, free sex, and hallucinogenic drugs were acceptable. The hippie movement was the antithesis of conservative American culture, which clashed when war raged in Vietnam.

Hippies believed that the mainstream authority was responsible for all wrongs, including the Vietnam war. The movement advocated for love, not war, and members were known as the flower child because of their passion for peace. However, they lived out their mantra of 'make love' literally.

In the 1960s, many young people were empowered by the hippie movement and didn't fear experimenting with drugs. They believed that taking these drugs was a way to expand their mind and experience other states of consciousness. The same period saw the rise to fame of the Grateful Dead, an American rock band whose eclectic style was famous with the counterculture movement. 

The hippie culture is still present today, even in social media. Hippies usually don't own anything, beg a lot, and they love music and festivities. The Haight Ashbury District is a famous hippie area in San Francisco, California, where you'll find the hippie culture alive. Many who refer to someone as a "wook" may be in the hippie category as well.

Cranker

A person who abuses crystal methamphetamine is called a cranker. Some slang dictionaries also refer to them as cranker, meth head, jig head, smackhead, and meth monster. Crystal methamphetamine is commonly referred to as blow clouds, tweaking, and smoking rain.

Meth is highly addictive, and it can be smoked, snorted, injected, or swallowed. The effects of meth are short yet powerful. People who abuse it have the urge to use the drug continuously.

Crankers are usually homeless because their addiction prevents them from keeping a job or being financially stable. 

A Pusher

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A pusher is someone who sells illegal drugs such as heroin and cocaine to addicts. Some slang words for a pusher include a chemist, candyman, copycat, herb doctor, peddler, dope peddler, source, square, and trap queen. Pushers are usually affiliated with massive drug cartels or gangs because they need to sell large amounts of drugs to profit. 

Dipper Head

A dipper head is a PCP (Phencyclidine) user, also known as a duster head. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, PCP use is one of the most dangerous addictions as the drug alters the mind leading to hallucinations. It leads to a distortion of one's environment, self, colors, sights, and perceptions. 

Phencyclidine intoxication symptoms may include delusions, hallucinations, disorientation, and clouded sensories. PCP abuse also disrupts sensory and time perception and produces inert movement disorders such as catatonia or stupor. PCP has a high potential for abuse and may lead to psychological dependence.

Junkie

A junkie or a cotton shooter is someone who's addicted to heroin. A casual user is a chipper, while those in their 40s and 50s are called dinosaurs.

Heroin use is a problem all over the world. Many people die every year from heroin use and heroin overdoses. In 2016, 948000 people reported using heroin in the USA in the past year. 

Heroin is an opioid drug that gives users a euphoric effect. Heroin addiction symptoms include severe withdrawal symptoms, cravings for heroin, lack of control over usage, and compulsive drug use. Treatment programs are effective for those addicted to heroin.

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Candy Man

A drug dealer who sells heroin laced with fentanyl or some other opioid pain reliever is a candyman. Fentanyl is 50-100 times more potent than Morphine. Other street names for fentanyl include Apache, China Girl, Friend, Goodfella, Jackpot, Murder 8, TNT, and Cash.

Candy-flipping

Candy flipping is when LSD is mixed with MDMA (ecstasy). The effects of candy-flipping are similar to both drugs, which creates intense euphoria. Some people feel sick after taking this combination. This experience could be a pathway to someone becoming a wook, themselves.

Chippers

Chippers are people who use drugs occasionally rather than all the time. They might even go for months without using any drugs, but they use them in low or moderate doses when they do choose to.

Many people who abuse drugs started as chippers. Chipping is not officially categorized among substance use disorders or addictions, but it can lead to one if users don't cut back their usage over time.

Drug abuse and addiction is a severe problem. Many people are addicted to drugs without realizing it because they might not consider mild drug abuse a problem. The risk factors supersede momentary pleasure. It is recommended that addicts get help from a treatment center to stop addiction and get on the road to recovery.