Why Are Older Adults Abusing Drugs More Than Ever?

Substance abuse among older adults is a significant issue that can have severe consequences for the health and well-being of older adults and those around them. Despite this, drug abuse rates among older adults are increasing faster than any other age group. A 2018 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration survey found that approximately one million seniors above 65 (or 2% of the senior population) had a substance use disorder in the past year. Some 3% use marijuana, and 1 in 10 engage in binge drinking.

The pandemic didn't help either, as lockdowns disrupted routines, isolation, and fear spread. 2020 reports from the National Center for Health Statistics showed a shocking 53% increase in opioid-related deaths among the baby boomers over the previous year. Alcohol-related deaths, which had already been rising for a decade in this age group, rose by 18%.

All these numbers lead us to the question, why are more older adults in the United States abusing drugs than ever before? This article will explore potential causes of this trend, including loneliness, boredom, mental health problems, and lack of access to appropriate healthcare.

older-adults-abusing-drugs-side-effects-binge-drinking-physical-ealth-quality-of-life-prescription-drug-interaction-senior-citizen-medication-misuse

Prescription Medication

One of the key factors behind increasing substance abuse among older adults is the use of prescription medications. Older adults may face an increased risk of chronic pain, heart disease, and other health conditions as they age.

As part of quality health care, prescription medications can help relieve symptoms and improve the quality of life. However, if the medication is misused, it could lead to abuse. Sadly, many senior citizens abuse prescription medications for reasons like:

Social Isolation

Social isolation, or the lack of social connections and relationships, can be a risk factor for substance abuse in adults of all ages. That's because it can lead to negative emotions such as loneliness, boredom, and stress.

substance-abuse-among-older-adults-long-term-addiction-treatment-recreational-marijuana-cannabis-abuse-prescription-drugs-social-isolation-mental-health-issues-Dallas-Texas

Older adults may be more vulnerable to social isolation due to retirement, losing a spouse or other loved ones, or limited mobility. They may turn to drugs or alcohol to cope with these negative emotions. Social isolation can also increase the risk of mental health problems such as depression and anxiety, which can increase the risk of substance abuse.

Mental Health Issues

Mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, and cognitive impairments can increase the risk of substance abuse in older adults. These mental health issues may be due to various factors, including the natural aging process, physical health problems, social isolation, or other stressors.

Older adults with mental health issues may turn to drugs or alcohol to cope with their emotions or self-medicate for their mental health problems. Substance abuse can temporarily relieve negative emotions but can also lead to addiction and other negative consequences. Substance abuse can also exacerbate mental health problems and create a cycle of substance abuse and mental health issues.

Other Common Causes of Drug Abuse Among the Elderly

Impacts of Drug Abuse Among Older Adults

Substance abuse among older adults can seriously impact physical and mental health and the overall quality of life. Some of the potential impacts of drug abuse among older adults include:

Challenges in Identifying Addiction in the Elderly

Age-related changes can make it difficult for caregivers and healthcare providers to recognize and diagnose substance abuse in older adults. These age-related changes include changes in metabolism, which can affect how quickly and effectively a person's body processes drugs. In addition, older adults may be less likely to report symptoms of substance abuse, as they may feel embarrassed or ashamed to admit that they are having a problem with drugs or alcohol.

These age-related changes can make it difficult for healthcare providers to identify addiction in an older adult accurately. For this reason, it is essential for caregivers and healthcare providers to be aware of the risk factors and warning signs of substance abuse among older adults.

behavioral-health-care-baby-boomers-heart-disease-addiction-treatment-prescription-drug-abuse-misuse-old-hippie-habits-mental-health-life-threatening-consequences-of-drugs-alcohol-dependence

Some Warning Signs of Drug Abuse in Older Adults

Some common signs that may indicate an older adult is abusing drugs or alcohol include:

Treating Substance Abuse in Older Adults

Addiction treatment in older adults should be tailored to the individual's age and health status. Treatment options include medication-assisted treatment, behavioral health therapies, counseling, and support groups. In some cases, long-term residential care may be necessary to ensure the individual gets the treatment they need to successfully manage addiction and live a healthy life.

It is also important to remember that addiction in older adults can be caused by underlying medical or mental health conditions. Therefore, it is essential to address any underlying issues to ensure that the individual receives comprehensive care and support.

888-249-2191

How Does Addiction Affect Men and Women Differently?

Addiction is a severe mental health condition that can have devastating consequences for those affected by it. Men and women experience addiction differently, yet the impact on their lives can be equally profound. While addiction causes many similar effects in men and women, there are some key differences between the sexes regarding how they develop a dependency, their likelihood of seeking help, and what sort of medically assisted help they need.

This article will provide an overview of how addiction affects men and women differently. In addition, it will explore the unique challenges that each gender faces in seeking treatment, overcoming substance abuse issues, and finding a path to recovery. By understanding the differences between men and women, we can better empathize with those affected by addiction and work to ensure that all people have access to the resources they need to combat addiction and move forward with their lives.

Dallas-Texas-addiction-treatment-prescription-drugs-illegal-drugs-mental-health-problems-substance-use-disorders-medically-assisted-treatment-MAT-evidence-based-drug-rehab

How Men and Women Become Addicted Differently

While anyone can develop an addiction to drugs or alcohol, certain factors may increase the risk of dependency. One of these factors is gender. Men and women typically develop addiction differently for various reasons, including biological differences, societal pressures, and other environmental factors.

According to the National Institute on Drugs Abuse, men are likely to use all kinds of illicit drugs, and these drugs can lead to ER visits or overdose deaths. Illegal drug use refers to using drugs like cocaine, heroin, fentanyl, marijuana, and prescription drugs illegally.

In addition, NIDA points out that men, in most age groups, have higher rates of use and dependence on alcohol and drugs than women. Studies have found that men are 2.2 times more likely to abuse substances and 1.9 times likelier to develop a drug dependence than women.

Historically, most substance use disorders (SUD) were seen in men. However, there's evidence that this has been shifting over the years. A study analyzed the rates of substance abuse by gender over many decades. It discovered that the gap between men and women was closing, as women and men are now developing SUD at near-equal rates.

Despite this, women may be more susceptible to craving substances and relapse, vital phases of the addiction cycle.

Notably, age significantly impacts addiction in both men and women. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration found that the use of illegal drugs was almost the same in youth ages 12 to 17 years.

The distinction between how men and women suffer from addiction stems from biological and sociological differences. Researchers believe this distinction is due to societal impact (like relationship dynamics, addiction stigma, childcare responsibilities, etc.). Men and women also have biological differences, primarily revolving around estrogen and testosterone production, along with body composition and size that can cause the drugs to affect the body differently.

Harvard notes that the main difference in addiction between the two genders revolves around susceptibility, recovery, and risk of relapse.

evidence-based-addiction-treatmennt-men-and-women-sexual-assault-family-members-prescription-drugs-illegal-drugs-mental-health-problems-substance-use-disorders

Susceptibility

Men are more likely to become dependent on substances. They also tend to develop drug addiction due to stress or peer pressure. On the other hand, women are more likely to develop addiction due to underlying mental health issues such as depression, anxiety disorders, or trauma history. For example, a woman who experiences sexual assault is more likely to self-medicate with drugs or alcohol to cope.

Women also experience accelerated progression from initial drug use to the onset of addiction and first admission to treatment. This phenomenon, called telescoping, has been observed in studies focusing on women addicted to alcohol or drugs like cannabis and opioids. It has been shown that women who enter addiction treatment often present with a more severe clinical profile than men despite having used fewer substances within a shorter timeframe than men. 

Recovery

Men tend to stabilize substance abuse at lower doses compared to women. They are also likely to experience more intense symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. On the other hand, women may experience more severe drug withdrawal symptoms, including liver damage and overdose. In addition, men may be more likely to experience heart problems due to drug use.

Risk of Relapse

Women have a much higher risk of experiencing intense cravings and relapse than men. This is due to various factors, including the biological differences mentioned earlier, but also due to societal pressures and other environmental factors.

Specific Substances

Alcohol

Women have less water in their bodies than men. This means they do not need as much alcohol to get drunk. Women also don't break down alcohol as fast because their body has lower levels of an enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase. Besides, men and women abuse alcohol for different reasons.

Men tend to drink for social reasons or to enhance positive emotions, while women sometimes use alcohol to alleviate mental health problems like stress or anxiety. This explains why more women have co-occurring alcohol abuse and mental disorders. Sadly, women are less likely to seek treatment for their binge drinking issues than men.

Opioids

Some studies indicate that women may experience chronic pain more intensely than men. This may explain why women are more likely to use prescription and illicit opioids for chronic pain management and why they develop addiction faster. Women also tend to get heightened dopamine responses in the brain, accelerating the development of a dependence on drugs. Despite their heightened susceptibility, men are more likely to misuse opioids and fatally overdose.

Surveys have shown that women are more likely to overdose fatally in the first years of an opioid use disorder involving injection. This is partly because of polydrug use. But they tend to survive heroin abuse after a few years of use compared to men.

Most women who abuse opioids, especially heroin, are young and mostly do so because of pressure from sexual partners or social circles. But they mostly take smaller doses for a shorter time and don't inject.

behavioral-health-chronic-pain-men-and-women-sexual-assault-cocaine-crystal-meth-methamphetamine-addiction-treatment

Stimulants

Women may be more likely to become addicted to stimulants, like drugs and alcohol, because their bodies are made differently. Women have hormones like estrogen, which can strengthen stimulants' effects. This means they need smaller amounts of drugs or alcohol to get drunk or high than men do.

Get Addiction Treatment for Both Men and Women

Men and women differ in their substance abuse behavior, how they experience addiction and its consequences, and how they respond to treatment. The differences between the genders should be considered when planning addiction treatment programs. Tailored interventions and gender-specific treatments are needed to help both men and women seek addiction treatment and successfully recover.

Group therapy, medication-assisted treatment (MAT), and other forms of behavioral health support are also crucial for a successful recovery. Family members must also play an essential part in treatment to help the individual cope with cravings and maintain abstinence. With proper support and treatment, both men and women have a good chance of achieving long-term recovery.

888-249-2191

Is the Fentanyl Vaccine Real? How Do I Get One?

At a time when drug overdose is quickly becoming an epidemic in the United States, researchers at the University of Houston are hard at work on a solution that could save countless lives. They're developing a vaccine for fentanyl, an opioid linked to numerous fatal overdoses. This fentanyl vaccine could be a major game changer in the deadly drug overdose epidemic that has been sweeping the nation.

This groundbreaking research seeks to create antibodies that will bind to the drug and block its ability to produce feelings of euphoria and cause an overdose. If this vaccine is successful, it will offer a powerful solution for people suffering from addiction and those at risk of accidental overdose.

But is this vaccine real, and how does one get it? In this article, we'll explore the progress of the research at the University of Houston and answer those questions. We'll also discuss how this new approach to overdose prevention differs from treatments such as Naloxone or Buprenorphine and why a publicly available vaccine may not be available for many years.

overdose-prevention-withdrawal-symptoms-scientific-breakthrough-discovery-substance-abuse-Houston-Texas-TX

Understanding the Fentanyl Vaccine

The University of Houston is leading the way in research on a fentanyl vaccine that could potentially save lives. The vaccine would work by creating antibodies that will bind to the dangerous synthetic drug and prevent it from entering the brain, drastically reducing its ability to produce feelings of euphoria.

The research published on Pharmaceutics found that the vaccine was effective in lab rats and didn't cause adverse side effects. In the study, both male and female rats that got immunized produced high levels of anti-fentanyl antibodies that neutralized fentanyl-induced effects. The vaccine also reduced the levels of fentanyl in the brain after drug administration and prevented the drop in measures like heart rate and oxygen saturation. 

According to one researcher, these findings could have a significant impact on the opioid crisis that has been crippling the country for years. The vaccine could provide an effective, sustainable and long-lasting solution to the opioid epidemic.

It prevents the most desired effects of the drug (getting high) and allows the drug to be eliminated from the body through the kidneys. And seeing there were no adverse side effects in the immunized rats in the studies, the research team plans on producing a clinical-grade vaccine in the future, with clinical trials on humans ensuing after. 

A Timely Help for the Fentanyl Crisis in the US

The potential for a fentanyl vaccine to save lives is immense. As the opioid crisis continues to widen, more and more people are becoming addicted to this powerful synthetic drug. A vaccine would offer an effective solution for people suffering from substance use disorders, those at risk of accidental overdose, and those in recovery.

In 2021, the Centers for Diseases Control reported 107,622 overdose deaths in the United States, with opioids accounting for over 75% of these fatalities. According to the CDC, opioid overdose cases increased from 70,029 in 2020 to 80,816 in 2021.

opioid-epidemic-substance-use-disorders-family-members-addiction-treatment-plans-support-groups

Synthetic opioids, such as fentanyl, were responsible for most of these fatalities. Fentanyl is a potent painkiller similar to morphine but 50 to 100 times more powerful. It has been linked to numerous overdose deaths and is increasingly becoming one of the most dangerous drugs in the country.

How is the Fentanyl Vaccine Different from Naloxone or Buprenorphine?

The fentanyl vaccine is different from maintenance treatments like naloxone or buprenorphine because it works by creating antibodies in the body that will bind to the dangerous synthetic drug, blocking its ability to produce feelings of euphoria and cause an overdose. Naloxone and buprenorphine, on the other hand, work by blocking or partially blocking opioid receptors. As a result, they are often used to reduce cravings and withdrawals in patients in recovery.

How Buprenorphine Works

Buprenorphine is an opioid agonist that stimulates the same receptors as opioids, such as heroin or fentanyl. This medication binds to the same receptors as opioids, producing similar effects but with much lower potency. This means that buprenorphine can block or partially block the feelings of intense euphoria caused by opioids while also reducing cravings and withdrawal symptoms.

How Naloxone Works

Naloxone is an opioid receptor antagonist that binds to the same receptors as opioids but with much higher potency. This means that it can completely block the effects of opioids, making it an essential medication for reversing opioid overdose. When administered on time, naloxone can rapidly reverse the effects of opioids, restoring normal respiration.

Unlike naloxone and buprenorphine, the fentanyl vaccine does not work by blocking the opioid receptors in the body. Instead, it stimulates the body's immune response to produce antibodies that bind to fentanyl molecules and block their effects. This means that those who get the vaccine won't feel high while using fentanyl and might therefore stop using the drug altogether.

It's important to note that the vaccine is still in its early stages of development and will take years before it's available on the market. Addiction treatment is currently the best way to prevent an overdose. Besides, some experts have pointed out that while the scientific breakthrough discovery is incredible and innovative, it is not a silver bullet to address the drug addiction crisis. That is to say, the vaccine mainly focuses on fentanyl's impact on the brain, yet environmental and social pressures also contribute to addiction.

family-members-addiction-treatment-plans-support-groups-group-therapy-behavioral-therapies

Addiction Treatment

Addiction treatment is the best way to prevent an overdose, manage withdrawal symptoms and treat substance abuse. It typically involves a combination of medications, behavioral therapies, and support groups. In many cases, family members are also included in addiction treatment plans and may help provide support and accountability.

At More Than Rehab, we understand that addiction is a complex issue and requires comprehensive treatment. We offer a range of treatments, including individual and group counseling, cognitive-behavioral therapy, group therapy relapse prevention, medication-assisted treatment, and 12-step programs. We also provide comprehensive aftercare services to ensure a successful recovery.

If you or someone you love is struggling with addiction, please contact us today to learn more about our services. We are here to help.

888-249-2191

Is it Possible to be Addicted to Marijuana?

Some people use marijuana as a recreational pastime. Others use it for medicinal purposes. Either way, many wonder if it's possible to become addicted to marijuana.

The answer is yes; it is possible to become addicted to marijuana just like any other drug or alcohol. According to studies, some people who use marijuana may develop marijuana use disorder meaning they have difficulty controlling their marijuana use.

Marijuana is a Schedule I drug and has a high potential for abuse. According to studies, marijuana is the most abused drug in the US. Both recreational and medical marijuana can cause dependence issues. 

What is Marijuana or Cannabis Use Disorder?

Marijuana or cannabis use disorder is having difficulty controlling your marijuana use. When you have marijuana use disorder, You may feel an intense desire to continue using despite adverse consequences, and you may experience withdrawal symptoms when trying to quit. The severity of marijuana use disorder is classified as mild, moderate, or severe.

public-health-cannabis-use-disorder-support-group-effects-of-marijuana-young-people-Houston-TX-area-drug-rehab

How Does Cannabis Use Disorder Happen?

Cannabis use disorder can happen when someone uses marijuana frequently or in large amounts. It can also be caused by physical, psychological, environmental, and genetic factors. The drug contains tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, a psychoactive ingredient that trigger's the brain's endocannabinoid receptors. Over time, you become less sensitive to the chemicals in marijuana and need more of it to feel the same effects.

Symptoms of Marijuana Dependence

The signs and symptoms of marijuana dependence can be physical or psychological.

Physical symptoms of marijuana use disorder include:

Psychological symptoms of marijuana use disorder include:

Legalization Efforts and the Impacts on Marijuana Use 

cannabis-dispensary-medical-marijuana-high-risk-drug-and-alcohol-addiction-treatment-More-Than-Rehab-Austin-Texas

In recent years, many states have legalized the use of marijuana for medicinal and recreational purposes. This has led to marijuana becoming more accessible and accepted in today's society. As a result, there has been an increasing number of individuals using marijuana and a greater number of individuals becoming addicted to it.

The legalization efforts have also increased the availability and variety of marijuana products, such as edibles, waxes, and oils. Some of these products have higher concentrations of THC than the traditional plant-based form of marijuana and can lead to more severe and longer-lasting effects on the user.

And as marijuana use becomes more common, more people are exposed to its risks. It's essential for individuals, especially those in vulnerable populations, to be aware of the potential risks associated with using marijuana and the potential for addiction.

It's also essential for people to know that help is available if they are struggling with dependence and addiction. Seeking treatment from a qualified professional can help individuals overcome their addiction and reclaim control of their lives.

Long-Term Effects of Marijuana Addiction

Though marijuana is often considered a harmless drug, many dangers are associated with long-term use.

health care withdrawal-symptoms-addicted-to-marijuana-dependence-addiction-treatment-Texas

Treatment Options for Marijuana Addiction

Fortunately, there is a range of treatment options available for people who are struggling with marijuana addiction.

At the moment, the FDA has not approved any medications specifically for the treatment of marijuana addiction. However, research is ongoing, and there are some promising results from trials with existing medications (like sleep and anti-epileptic drugs) that may be effective in treating marijuana use disorder.

Finally, professional rehab and support groups can be an essential part of recovery for people with marijuana addiction. These will provide peer-based support, public health care resources, mental health treatment, and life skills training that can help people rebuild their lives.

No matter what approach is taken, the most crucial step in overcoming marijuana addiction is a commitment to making positive changes in one's life. With the proper support and dedication, it's possible to break free from addiction and start living a healthier, more fulfilling life.

888-249-2191

What Are the 12 Steps of Addiction Recovery?

Addiction is a chronic mental condition that can be hard to overcome. Even after comprehensive addiction treatment, the risk of relapse is always present. Joining Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous can help you better understand your addiction and find healthy ways to cope with it. The 12 steps can help individuals dealing with all types of substance abuse, including:

Understanding 12-Step Programs

The 12-step program is a set of guidelines for recovery from addiction. The steps were first formulated by the founders of Alcoholics Anonymous, Bill Wilson and Bob Smith, and have since been adapted for many other forms of addiction recovery, including Narcotics Anonymous, Cocaine Anonymous, and Marijuana Anonymous.

cocaine-anonymous-addiction-medicine-twelve-steps-12 step-programs-personal-inventory-evidence-based-drug-rehab-Houston-Texas

Bill Wilson and Bob wrote the book Alcoholics Anonymous (or The Big Book as it is commonly known), which outlines 12 sequential steps for addiction recovery.

The program involves admitting that you have a problem and cannot control your addiction and making amends for the harm you have caused. It also includes a commitment to attend AA meetings and to help other addicts.

The 12-step program is essential because it provides a roadmap for recovery. It helps addicts take responsibility for their addiction and to make positive changes in their lives. It also offers support and accountability, which are essential for long-term sobriety.

The 12 Steps of Addiction Recovery

The 12 steps of addiction recovery are:

1.   We admitted we were powerless over alcohol – that our lives had become unmanageable.

Addiction is a chronic mental condition that can be hard to overcome. Even after a comprehensive treatment, the risk of relapse is always present. Step One aims to relabel the addiction as a disease rather than a character flaw. It is structured around the belief that one is "powerless" over their chronic illness.

Those who enter AA or NA acknowledge their inability to control their drinking and that their life has become unmanageable. Step One is often the stage of acceptance.

2.   Came to believe that a power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.

While Step One acknowledges the lack of control, Step Two suggests that an external force can help. Some people interpret the "power greater than ourselves" as a higher power, such as a God or spiritual being. However, it does not necessarily need to be religious or spiritual. It can be karma, meditation, the universe, medical professional, etc.

Step Two allows individuals to gain faith in something bigger than themselves. And acceptance in Step One plays a vital role in opening one up to external help.

substance-abuse-narcotics-anonymous-spiritual-awakening-AA-meeting-12-steps

3.   Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.

Step Three is an acknowledgment of one's willingness to surrender their will and life over to the care of a higher power. It provides individuals with a platform to admit they cannot do this alone. Religious people may find the concept of "God as we understood Him" helpful, while others may find other ideas more suitable. The main point of Step Three is to recognize that the power lies outside of yourself and that this power is essential for recovery.

4.   Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.

Step Four is all about self-reflection and introspection. It encourages individuals to take a critical look at their lives and examine how they have made decisions in the past and what led them down the path of addiction. Understanding one's triggers and making changes is essential to prevent future relapses. Step Four can be difficult as it forces one to confront their past and accept responsibility for their actions.

5.   Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.

Step Five is the stage of confession, where individuals must admit to themselves, God, and another human being the exact nature of their wrongs. This can be a difficult step as it involves confronting and addressing the harm they have caused. But the step helps individuals to learn to take responsibility for their actions and make amends for the damage they have caused.

6.   Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.

Step Six is a preparation step, where individuals must make themselves entirely ready to have their higher power remove all their character defects. This involves letting go of the negative traits that have kept them stuck in addiction and mental discomfort. It requires faith and trust in the higher power, as it involves surrendering one's ego and allowing a power greater than themselves to make one ready for recovery.

7.   Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.

Step Seven is an act of humility, where individuals ask their higher power to remove their shortcomings and defects of character. This step requires honesty and courage to admit out loud one's willingness to be changed and molded into a better version of themselves.

addiction-treatment-Dallas-TX-support-groups-big-book-higher-power

8.   Made a list of all persons we had harmed and became willing to make amends to them all.

Step Eight is the stage of accountability, where individuals must list those they have harmed and become willing to make amends to them all. It's essential for taking responsibility and restoring relationships damaged due to addiction. It allows individuals to mend broken bridges and create a better life.

9.   Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.

Step Nine is the stage of action, where individuals make direct amends to those they have harmed whenever possible. This step requires individuals to take responsibility for their actions and reach out to the people they have hurt. It is a decisive step in healing relationships and restoring trust between individuals.

10. Continued to take personal inventory and, when we were wrong, promptly admitted it.

Step Ten is the stage of continuous self-reflection, where individuals must continue to take personal inventory and admit when they are wrong. This step emphasizes that recovery should be lifelong, requiring people to stay vigilant and hold themselves accountable for their actions. It helps ensure individuals do not slip back into old habits or behaviors that could lead them to addiction again.

11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out

Step Eleven is about deepening one's connection and relationship with their higher power. It encourages individuals to seek knowledge of their higher power's will through prayer and meditation and to ask for the ability to carry out that will. This step helps individuals maintain strong faith in their higher power and stay committed to recovery.

drug-addiction-help-mental-health-care-insurance-coverage-higher-power-spiritual-awakening-relapse-prevention-substance-use-disorders-detox-center-inpatient-outpatient-services

12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics and practice these principles in all our affairs.

Step Twelve is the culmination of all the previous steps, as it marks the point where individuals have had a spiritual awakening due to working through the Twelve Steps. This step encourages individuals to spread their newfound knowledge and wisdom to other alcoholics to help them recover. It also emphasizes that principles from the Twelve Steps should be applied to all facets of their life.

The Twelve Steps provide individuals with the necessary structure, guidance, and encouragement for recovery from addiction. Each step is an essential milestone to sobriety, helping individuals progress towards a healthier and happier lifestyle.

By working through each step one at a time, individuals can develop the strength and courage to make lasting changes. As individuals progress through the Twelve Steps, they will find that their relationship with themselves and others improves significantly. Ultimately, the Twelve Steps offer a roadmap for recovery, empowering individuals to take control of their life and create a brighter future.

Finding Treatment Programs

There are many 12-step programs available to help individuals make a successful recovery. At More Than Rehab, we can connect you to one that matches your needs. We can also connect you to other support groups and resources to help you stay on track with your recovery. Contact us today to learn more and start your journey toward sobriety.

888-249-2191

What Does Long Term Drug Use Do To Your Body?

When it comes to drug abuse, the main concern is often the immediate health impacts of drug use. However, there are also several long-term effects of drug abuse on various systems in the body. For example, prolonged exposure to certain drugs can cause changes in vital organs like the heart, lungs, liver, and brain.

These changes can lead to serious health problems like liver disease, liver failure, brain damage, mental illness, heart disease, and in some cases, death. Chronic drug use can increase susceptibility to other diseases like cancer or infections due to suppressed immune function.

This article will take a closer look at some of the more common long-term effects of drug abuse on various systems in the body.

Different Classes of Drugs and Their Long-Term Implications on the Body

There are three types of drugs; depressants, stimulants, and hallucinogens. Each one has a different effect on the body.

long-term-drug-use-liver-failure-side-effects-brain-damage-blood-vessels-cognitive-function

Depressants

Depressants like alcohol, cannabis, benzodiazepines, heroin and other opioids slow down the function of the central nervous system (CNS). Depressants may cause slower reflexes, dizziness, and poor coordination and balance when taken in small quantities.

Large doses may lead to nausea, drowsiness, and loss of consciousness. When taken over a long period, depressants may cause changes in brain structure, creating long-term imbalances in hormonal and neuronal systems that are not easily reversed. Other common effects include:

Stimulants

Stimulants like amphetamines, cocaine, and MDMA increase the activity of the central nervous system. In small doses, stimulants may increase heart rate, body temperature, and blood pressure and cause reduced appetite, sleeplessness, and agitation. Large doses may lead to anxiety, paranoia, aggression, panic, stomach cramps, and seizures. Long-term use has been linked to the following:

Hallucinogens

Hallucinogens like LSD, ketamine, and magic mushrooms alter a person's perception of reality. They may cause visual and auditory hallucinations, confusion, paranoia, anxiety, and panic. Long-term use has been linked to the following:

Long-Term Effects of Drugs on the Heart and Circulatory System

One of the most common long-term effects of drug abuse is damage to the heart and circulatory system. Drugs particularly harmful to the heart include stimulants like cocaine and methamphetamine, which can cause increased heart rate and blood pressure. This strains the heart and can lead to conditions like aneurysms, heart attacks, and death.

blood-pressure-weight-loss-chest-pain-liver-disease-kidney-heart-failure

Stimulant use can cause cardiomyopathies, myocardial infarctions, aortic dissection, and endocarditis. In other cases, they may exacerbate pre-existing heart conditions, speeding the heart damage. 

Other drugs like opioids and alcohol can slow heart rate and circulation to dangerous levels. Excessive alcohol intake can lead to high heart failure, blood pressure, or stroke. It can also cause cardiomyopathy, a disorder that affects the heart muscle. Alcohol has also been linked to obesity and the long list of health problems that can go along with it.

Long-Term Effects of Drugs on the Respiratory System

Another common long-term effect of drug abuse is damage to the lungs. This is particularly true for smoked drugs like marijuana, tobacco, and crack cocaine. Repeated exposure to toxic chemicals in cigarette smoke can cause inflammation and promote oxidative stress in the outer lining of the lungs. Over time, this leads to chronic inflammation and scarring, making it more difficult for oxygen to flow through the lungs and into other organs. 

Likewise, drugs like heroin can cause significant damage to lung tissue due to their direct impact on blood vessels. In particular, these substances constrict blood vessels and inhibit oxygen delivery to vital organs like the brain and heart. Drug use has been linked to different respiratory problems, including bronchitis, chronic cough, emphysema, and lung cancer. Inhalation of these drugs can also damage the airways and make breathing difficult.

Long-Term Effects of Drugs on the Brain

Drugs interfere with the normal functioning of neurotransmitters, which are responsible for transmitting signals from one neuron to another. In particular, drugs affect the release of dopamine and other key neurotransmitters that regulate mood, reward processing, decision-making, and movement.

As these chemicals are disrupted by drug use, users can experience various unpleasant side effects, including intense cravings, confusion, altered consciousness, and impaired motor control. Moreover, prolonged drug use can have lasting impacts on brain development, particularly in adolescents and young adults who are still experiencing significant neurological changes throughout their formative years.

Drugs affect the brain in different ways, including:

Long-Term Effects of Drugs on the Liver

The liver is responsible for filtering toxins out of the blood, so it's not surprising that drug abuse can significantly impact this vital organ. In particular, drugs like alcohol and heroin can cause liver damage by promoting inflammation and cell death.

Over time, this can lead to cirrhosis, a condition in which the liver cannot function properly. Other drugs, like methamphetamine, can also damage the liver by causing oxidative stress. These changes can lead to liver inflammation, fibrosis, and cirrhosis as your body gets older.

drug-and-alcohol-addiction-treatment-Austin-Dallas-TX-More-Than-Rehab

Long-Term Effects of Drugs on the Kidneys

The kidneys are responsible for filtering waste and toxins out of the blood. Drug abuse can damage these organs and impair their ability to function properly. In particular, drugs like heroin, amphetamines, and cocaine can cause kidney failure or damage by causing inflammation and oxidative stress. These changes can lead to kidney disease, which can be fatal.

Long-Term Effects of Drugs on the Immune System

Chronic drug use can compromise the body's ability to fight off infections and disease, increasing an individual's susceptibility to illness. In addition, heavy drug use has been linked to conditions like HIV and hepatitis, especially among IV drug users. These conditions can compromise the immune system.

How to Quit Using Drugs

The best way to be healthy again is to quit using drugs. Your body and mind can return to normal when you stop using drugs. However, quitting is often the hardest part. Addiction changes the brain in ways that make it difficult to control cravings and resist the urge to use. 

Withdrawal symptoms also make quitting difficult, as they can be uncomfortable and dangerous. So quitting is often more than just a matter of willpower. It requires a comprehensive treatment plan that addresses the underlying causes of addiction as well as other possible health care issues.

That's why it's important to seek professional help when ready to quit. Addiction treatment centers like More Than Rehab provide the support you need to detox safely and overcome your addiction. With the right care, you can get your life back on track and restore your physical and mental health.

 

 

888-249-2191

Why Are Opiates Like Heroin So Addictive? 

Opiates are a class of drugs that include both illegal drugs such as heroin and prescription medications such as morphine and codeine. Made from the poppy plant, these powerful substances work by binding to receptors in the brain, triggering feelings of euphoria and reducing pain.

While opiates have long been used for their therapeutic properties, they are also widely abused for recreational use. In fact, opiates are some of the most commonly abused drugs in the United States, with heroin addiction rates skyrocketing in recent years.

According to the National Survey in Drug Use and Health 2019 report, 10.1 million people aged 12 or older misused opioids. 9.7 million misused prescription pain relievers, and 745,000 people used heroin. Sadly, overdose deaths involving opioids increased from about 70,029 in 2020 to 80,816 in 2021.

Most of these overdose deaths involved synthetic opioids like fentanyl, which is now often added to street heroin to increase its potency. Fentanyl is 50 to 100 times more powerful than morphine, making it extremely dangerous and highly addictive.

Chasing the Heroin High

The powerful effects of heroin are impossible to resist for many people. Once someone takes the drug for the first time, they quickly become hooked on its potent high and find themselves chasing that feeling over and over again. This process is fueled by different aspects of addiction, like withdrawal symptoms, tolerance, and cravings.

chasing-the-dragon-opiates-heroin-high-morphine-mental-health-issues

Withdrawal symptoms set in when a person stops using heroin or reduces their dosage. These symptoms can be both mental and physical and vary in intensity. They can include everything from anxiety and irritability to nausea and diarrhea. In some cases, heroin withdrawal symptoms can be so severe that they lead people back to drug use to get rid of the uncomfortable feelings.

Tolerance occurs when a person needs increasingly larger doses of heroin to get the same effects. As tolerance builds, people start to experience withdrawal symptoms more often, even if they're still using the drug. This can create a never-ending cycle of addiction in which people are constantly chasing that initial high while also trying to avoid withdrawal symptoms.

Cravings are another major factor in heroin addiction. These strong desires for the drug can be triggered by anything from seeing drug paraphernalia to hearing someone mention heroin use. Cravings are often so intense that they lead people to use heroin, even when trying to quit.

Ultimately, these factors leave little room for choice or willpower on the part of the person abusing heroin. Instead, they become driven by a compulsion to abuse this dangerous drug in an attempt to recreate that initial euphoric rush again and again.

Understanding Heroin Addiction and How it Happens

At the chemical level, heroin is very similar to opioids like morphine and codeine. Like these drugs, it works by activating opioid receptors in the brain and triggering the release of large amounts of dopamine. This flood of dopamine produces a potent sense of euphoria, which is why so many people are drawn to heroin in the first place.

opiates-euphoria-getting-high-chasing-the-dragon-heroin-withdrawal-opioids-morphine-oxycontin-oxycodone-prescription-drug-abuse-pills-painkillers-long-term-mental-health-issues

However, this intense pleasure also causes addiction to develop and flourish. In the long term, repeated heroin use causes changes in the brain that make it difficult to experience normal feelings of happiness or pleasure without using the drug. This drives people to continue abusing heroin even when they are fully aware of its harmful effects.

In addition, repeated exposure to heroin can lead to tolerance and dependence, both physical and psychological factors that severely complicate the recovery process. Heroin withdrawal issues are persistent and difficult to overcome.

Eventually, one develops an addiction and cannot live without the drug. This is when people start doing things they would never have done before to get their hands on heroin. They may steal from family or friends, lie, cheat, or engage in other illegal activities to get money to buy more drugs. Heroin addiction can happen in less than a week, depending on the frequency of use and purity.

Risk Factors for Heroin Addiction

When most people start abusing opioids like heroin, they assume they're in control and can handle it without getting addicted. But like other mental health issues, substance use disorder can take over a person's life without warning. Some people are more vulnerable to addiction than others, and certain risk factors can make someone more likely to develop a problem with heroin. These include: 

1.    Family history of addiction or mental illness

2.    Childhood trauma or abuse

3.    Previous substance abuse

4.    Mental health disorders like depression or anxiety

5.    A difficult or abusive home life

6.    Peer pressure or a desire to fit in

7.    Access to drugs

8.    Curiosity about drugs

Treatment for Opioid Addiction

Treatment is essential if you or someone you love is addicted to opioids like heroin. Opioid addiction is a serious condition that can lead to overdose and death, but there is hope. With the right treatment plan, people can recover from drug addiction and go on to lead happy, healthy, and productive lives.

cognitive-behavioral-therapy-cbt-heroin-addiction-treatment-support-groups-substance-use-disorder-evidence-based-drug-rehab

Heroin addiction treatment often consists of detox, followed by rehabilitation and therapy. Detox is the first step in treatment and involves getting rid of all traces of the drug from the body. This can be a difficult and uncomfortable process, but it is necessary on the road to recovery and long-term sobriety.

After detox, people usually enter a rehabilitation program. Rehabilitation programs can last for 30 days or more, and they typically involve group and individual therapy, support groups, and other activities designed to help people recover from addiction. Cognitive behavioral therapy is a common approach used in heroin addiction treatment, as it can help people change the thoughts and behaviors that lead to drug abuse. 

Patients with dual diagnosis, meaning they suffer from both addiction and another mental health disorder, may need to receive treatment for both conditions at the same time. This is because treating one condition without the other can often make relapse prevention difficult.

Heroin is an extremely addictive drug. If you or someone close is struggling with a heroin addiction, More Than Rehab is always there to help. Give us a call. We are available 24/7, 365 days a year.

888-249-2191

Why is Addiction So Hard to Overcome?

Most people don't understand why or how other people become addicted to drugs. They may mistakenly think that those who use drugs lack moral principles or willpower and that they could stop their drug use simply by choosing to do so. In reality, addiction is a complex disease, and quitting usually takes more than good intentions or a strong will. 

People with an addiction may feel compulsively driven to seek and use drugs even though they know the substance is causing them damage. They may want to stop using but feel powerless to do so. Over time, continued substance abuse changes how the brain functions, which can drive an increased need for the drug. These brain changes can be long-lasting and lead to harmful behaviors seen in people with substance use disorders. 

Understanding Drug Addiction

Drug addiction is a chronic disease that affects the brain's decision-making center. It is characterized by compulsive drug seeking despite negative consequences. People with addiction often feel unable to control their drug use and continue using despite the harm it causes.

mental-health-addiction-so-hard-to-overcome-treatment-behavioral-therapy-substance-use-disorders-treatment-options-Houston-Texas

People who become addicted to drugs often start using substances recreationally or to cope with underlying mental health issues. They may not understand the risks involved and how quickly addiction can develop. Tolerance to drugs builds up quickly, meaning that larger and larger doses are needed to get the same effect. As drug use escalates, so do the risks for negative consequences, including addiction.

Unfortunately, overcoming addiction is not as easy. One cannot just snap out of it; attempting to quit cold turkey could lead to unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. In fact, many addicts will go back to using because the withdrawal symptoms are too difficult to bear.

Why Do Some People Develop Drug Addictions?

Most experts agree that addiction is not caused by a single factor but is instead the result of a combination of genetic, biochemical, and environmental factors. Addiction can also be due to psychological reasons. This means that some people are more vulnerable to addiction than others, even if they're exposed to the same risk factors. 

But just because someone has one or more of these risk factors doesn't mean they will necessarily develop an addiction. Likewise, not having any risk factors doesn't mean someone won't become addicted. Still, the more risk factors a person has, the greater their chance of developing an addiction. 

Psychological Reasons for Addiction 

People with mental issues like anxiety, depression, ADHD, guilt, shame, or bipolar disorder are more likely to turn to drugs as a form of self-medication. Drugs tend to temporarily relieve the symptoms of these underlying mental disorders.

For example, people with anxiety may use marijuana to relax, while someone with depression may temporarily use stimulants to feel happier. However, using drugs in this way can lead to addiction and make the underlying mental disorder worse.

mental-health-family-members-support-groups-substance-use-disorders-health-problems-psychological-reasons-biochemical-addiction

Biochemical Reasons for Addiction

When someone uses drugs or drinks alcohol, it triggers a dopamine release in the brain. Dopamine is a chemical that is associated with pleasure and rewards, and it helps to reinforce certain behaviors. As a result, the person feels good when they use drugs or drink alcohol and is more likely to repeat the behavior.

Over time, the brain's reward system becomes less sensitive to dopamine, and the person needs to use more drugs or alcohol to achieve the same level of pleasure. This can lead to biochemical addiction, as the person cannot control their use despite negative consequences.

Environmental Reasons for Addiction

Exposure to alcohol and drugs at an early age can increase the risk of developing an addiction later in life. This is because the developing brain is more susceptible to the effects of drugs and alcohol.

In addition, stress and trauma can also lead to addiction. People who cannot cope with their problems may turn to drugs or alcohol to numb the pain. These environmental factors can greatly increase the risk of developing an addiction.

The Challenge of Beating a Drug Addiction

Addiction is a serious issue that affects millions of people around the world. It is a complex condition that can profoundly impact every aspect of an individual's life. Despite the challenges, it is important to remember that addiction is treatable and recovery is possible. Beating addiction is hard, but it is not impossible. 

There are several reasons why overcoming addiction is so difficult.

  1. First and foremost, addiction changes the way the brain functions. Repeated drug abuse alters the brain's circuitry, making it difficult to stop using even when an individual wants to.
  2. Additionally, addiction can lead to physical dependence, meaning that the body becomes accustomed to functioning with the drug and begins to experience withdrawal symptoms when it is not present. These withdrawal symptoms can be extremely unpleasant, making it difficult for someone to stay sober for any time.
  3. Finally, addiction often co-occurs with other mental health problems, which can complicate treatment and make a recovery all the more difficult. 

Despite the challenges, however, treatment is possible, and many people do go on to lead healthy, drug-free lives.

why-is-it-so-hard-to-overcome-addiction-treatment-drug-and-alcohol-abuse-Houston-TX-evidence-based-treatment-program-inpatient-outpatient

How to Overcome Addiction

Overcoming addiction requires a comprehensive treatment plan that addresses the underlying causes of addiction, as well as the addict's individual needs. Treatment should be tailored to each person and may include detoxification, therapy, and relapse prevention.

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to treating addiction, as each person’s experience is unique. However, certain principles are essential for all successful treatment programs. These principles include:

If you or someone you love is struggling with addiction, don't give up hope. Help is available, and there is light at the end of the tunnel. With treatment and support, it is possible to recover and lead healthy, drug-free lives.

888-249-2191

Can You Get Treatment For A Xanax Addiction?

Xanax is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called benzodiazepines. These drugs are some of the most commonly abused substances in the world. They're also responsible for a high number of emergency rooms visit across the United States. Benzodiazepines slow down the nervous system and have a calming effect on the user. Xanax is typically prescribed to treat medical conditions like anxiety and panic disorders, but it is also commonly abused for its calming and relaxation effects.

Warning Signs of Xanax Abuse

Many people use Xanax as directed by their doctor to treat anxiety or panic disorders. However, some people misuse or abuse Xanax, which can lead to serious consequences. Warning signs of Xanax addiction:

family-members-signs-of-Xanax-addiction-side-effects-emergency-rooms-treatment-mental-health

People who abuse prescription drugs like Xanax may crush and snort the pills or mix them with alcohol or other drugs. Mixing Xanax with other drugs can be dangerous as it increases the risk of overdose and other serious side effects.

Side Effects of Xanax Abuse

Xanax abuse can lead to physical, mental, and behavioral health problems. Some of the most common side effects of Xanax abuse include:

Xanax can also cause severe or rare side effects like:

 

How Addiction to Xanax Happens

People who abuse Xanax may start taking the drug as prescribed by their doctor. However, over time they may begin to take more of the drug than prescribed, or take it more often. They may continue to use the drug even when it is no longer needed. This can lead to addiction.

Xanax binds to the brain's GABA receptors and increases the level of the neurotransmitter GABA. This results in feelings of calm and relaxation. However, when people take Xanax regularly, they build up a tolerance for the drug. This means they need to take larger and larger doses to achieve the same effect.

As their tolerance builds, so does their dependence on the drug. And as their dependence grows, so does their risk of developing an addiction. Withdrawal symptoms can occur when someone dependent on Xanax stops taking the medication cold turkey.

These symptoms can include anxiety, irritability, insomnia, sweating, shaking, and seizures. If you or someone you know is struggling with an addiction to Xanax, help is available.

prescription-drugs-panic-disorders-seeking-treatment-cold-turkey-medical-conditions-Dallas-TX

Xanax Addiction Treatment Options

For those seeking treatment there are different Xanax addiction treatment options available. These treatments can be tailored to the individual's needs. Some of the most common options include:

Therapy and Group Support

Therapy provides a safe space for people to process their feelings and work through any underlying mental health issues contributing to their addiction. There are different types of therapies available, such as:

Other Medications

Many other medications can be used for the treatment of Xanax addiction. These include antipsychotics, antidepressants, and mood stabilizers. Each of these medications can help to ease the symptoms of Xanax addiction and allow the person to better cope with withdrawal.

Antipsychotics can help to reduce paranoia and delusions, while antidepressants can help to ease depression and anxiety. Mood stabilizers can help to even out mood swings and reduce irritability. These medications can be used with therapy and counseling to provide the most effective treatment for Xanax addiction.

drug-rehab-program-health-care-period-of-time-outpatient-treatment-inpatient-rehab-benzodiazepine-misuse-sobriety-overdose-prevention

Medication Tapering

Medication tapering is a process whereby the dosage of a medication is slowly reduced over time, helping to minimize withdrawal symptoms. This approach can be used for Xanax addiction and has been shown to be effective in helping people overcome their dependence on the drug. The first step is to work with a doctor or other professional to create a tapering schedule.

This schedule will start with a high dose of Xanax and gradually reduce the amount over time. The goal is to eventually reach a point where the person is no longer taking any Xanax at all. The process can be difficult, but it is often successful in helping people break free from their addiction.

Get Help for your Xanax Addiction

If you or someone you love is struggling with an addiction to Xanax, it is important to seek help as soon as possible. Many treatment options are available, and the sooner you seek help, the better. Don't wait to get help. Start your journey to recovery from addiction today.

888-249-2191

The Challenges of Going Back to School for Recovering Addicts

In recent years, drug use among high school and college students has become a growing problem. According to the 2021 Monitoring the Future survey by the National Institute on Drug Use, about 50% of high school seniors have tried an illegal drug at least once.

The availability of drugs and relentless peer pressure can make it difficult for young people to resist trying them. And while most young people who use drugs don't go on to develop a substance use disorder, for those who do, the consequences can be devastating. They may end up with physical and mental health issues and even death due to overdose.

A SAMHSA report showed a strong correlation between drug abuse and dropout rates. Students abusing drugs are more likely to drop out of school than those who don't. But luckily, those who go through addiction treatment can regain control of their lives and get back on track. For some, this means going back to school.

However, going back to school after addiction treatment can present its own unique set of challenges, including:

Juggling a Busy School Schedule and Managing Addiction Recovery

Managing triggers and avoiding relapse is a full-time job for anyone in addiction recovery. But the challenge is even greater for those who are also juggling a busy school schedule. Between classes, homework, extracurricular activities, and social obligations, there is little time for self-care. And when addiction recovery is not given the attention, it needs, the risk of relapse increases.

back-to-school-recovering-addict-high-school-seniors-monitoring-the-future-survey-prescription-drugs

The key to managing both a busy school schedule and addiction recovery is to create a support system. This might include finding a trusted mentor or sober friend, attending regular meetings, or working with a therapist. By enlisting the help of others, those in recovery can increase their chances of success in both areas of their life.

Making New Friends and Building Relationships with People Who Are Not Addicts

This can be difficult because the recovering addict may feel like they have to explain their past or justify their choices to the non-addicts. The addict may also feel like they are not worthy of friendship or love from non-addicts.

However, it is important to remember that everyone has a past and that everyone is worthy of friendship and love. If you are a recovering addict, try to be open and honest with new people you meet, and give them a chance to get to know you. You may be surprised at how accepting and understanding they can be.

Staying Sober in a Party-Filled Campus Environment

Returning to school as a recovering addict can be challenging, especially if the campus environment is party-filled. Staying sober in an environment where others are binge drinking, smoking marijuana, or even taking prescription drugs can be difficult, but it is possible.

family-members-addiction-recovery-national-institutes-on-drug-abuse-mental-health-abusing-drugs

Overcoming Self-Doubt and Believing in Oneself Again

It can be challenging for a recovering addict to overcome self-doubt and believe in oneself again. This is especially true when going back to school. The addict may have been out of school for many years and may feel that they are not up to the task of completing a degree. They may also have battled with drug or alcohol addiction for many years and feel that they're not capable of achieving success in sobriety.

However, the addict should remember that they can achieve anything they set their mind to. If the addict is willing to work hard and stay focused, there is no reason why they cannot succeed in school and recovery.

College Programs Designed to Help People Recover

Addiction is a serious disease that can have devastating consequences. Thankfully, there are college programs designed to help people in recovery succeed at finishing their high school diploma or college degree, including:

These programs provide support and resources that can make all the difference in someone's journey to recovery. With the right support, people in recovery can achieve their educational goals and go on to lead happy and healthy lives.

back-to-school-high-school-seniors-binge-drinking-evidence-based-addiction-treatment-careers-More-Than-Rehab-Dallas-TX

Benefits of Completing your Education 

For many people in drug addiction recovery, going back to school can be an important step on the road to a successful future. Returning to education can help boost self-esteem and confidence and provide a sense of structure and purpose. It can also lead to improved employment prospects, increased earnings potential, and better relationships with friends and family members.

Moreover, research has shown that people who have continued education are less likely to relapse into drug use than those who drop out. Therefore, returning to school can be an extremely beneficial step for those recovering from drug addiction.

Quitting Drugs and Alcohol Can Make Life Better

Addiction can ruin health, relationships, and finances. If you're struggling with addiction, getting help from a professional drug rehab can be vital to turning your life around. In addition to getting professional help, you can also do a few things on your own to increase your chances of success.

Deciding to quit drugs and alcohol can be daunting, but it's also one of the best decisions you can make for your health, relationships, and future. With the right support, you can overcome addiction and go on to lead a happy and successful life. Call us today to begin your pathway to addiction recovery!

888-249-2191