How Much Does Alcohol Rehab Cost?

It is never a good feeling when you, or a loved one, are considering whether or not professional treatment is necessary for an alcohol use disorder or an alcohol addiction.

However, the simple fact that there is even a question is a strong indicator that there is possibly a problem and that professional help may be necessary. This is especially true if there have been negative consequences associated with the alcohol use, such as getting a DUI, getting fired from work, relationship difficulties, getting in trouble with the law, or other negative consequences of drug or alcohol abuse.

According to the National Institute on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, around 17.6 million people struggle with an alcohol abuse or dependence issue every year in the United States. So, just know that if you or a loved one are suffering, you are certainly not alone. In the year since the pandemic began, alcohol use has seen a sharp increase in the United States.

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One of the biggest steps that people can take when they are suffering from an alcohol use disorder or addiction is to admit that they have a problem, and then get the help necessary to recover.

Once you have decided that help may be necessary for whoever is struggling, you may begin to wonder if your family can afford it.

Exactly how much does alcohol rehab cost?

Well, the answer to this question can depend on many factors. No two people are alike, and the same can be said about their addictions. The cost will typically depend on the level of treatment required for that individual to begin the road to a successful recovery.

The level of treatment someone needs depends on a variety of issues such as how long they’ve been using alcohol or drugs, whether they abuse alcohol in combination with other drugs or substances, and how often they abuse their drug of choice. Depending on the severity of the symptoms and the addiction, a more intensive treatment may be necessary.

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What is an alcohol rehab program like?

Typically, when a person is looking to get treatment for alcohol abuse, they do an intake assessment to determine what level of care is appropriate. When it comes to alcohol rehab, there are several different levels of treatment, each with their own general cost. Here are some of the most common.

*These prices are based off out-of-pocket expenses without insurance coverage. However, many insurance companies will pay for all or a portion of alcohol rehab treatment costs.

Aside from the different levels of treatment that may affect the overall cost of alcohol rehab, there are several other factors to consider when it comes to the price. One of those factors is the length of the program. Along with the intake assessment, many treatment centers will also specify an amount of time they believe necessary for effective treatment. Depending on the individual's specific needs, this time frame typically ranges between 30 to 90 days.

The location and amenities of the treatment center can also play a significant role in the overall cost. If you decide to go to an alcohol rehab center located on the beach, it’s likely to cost more than the one nestled in the heart of a small inland city.

The amenities the rehab center offers will also add some major dollar signs to the total cost. Some luxury rehabs offer acupuncture, private tennis courts, and swimming pools. Keep in mind that you don't have to stay at the Ritz in order to get quality treatment but choosing a treatment center with just the right number of amenities may go a long way in making the stay much more enjoyable and beneficial in the long run.

At our beautiful Texas rehab centers, known collectively as More Than Rehab, we combine the right balance of affordability, while still providing luxuries that encourage you to get involved with your recovery process. If you feel as though the cost of alcohol rehab may be too much, keep in mind that most insurance plans will cover all, or a portion of the cost for your alcohol addiction or substance abuse treatment.

At More Than Rehab we offer a wide range of care levels and work with most major insurance companies. We pride ourselves on remaining affordable while providing the highest quality of care--all while staying at a beautiful and serene location surrounded by the most wonderful natural surroundings that Texas has to offer.

There is absolutely no shame in getting help when you need it. So please reach out to us today at More Than Rehab and let our highly trained staff help you or your loved one. As always, we are available 24/7. Give us a call today!

888-249-2191

What Is A Dual Diagnosis?

Unfortunately, addiction or substance use disorders are very common in our country. Nearly 21 million Americans struggle with this disease every day. Sadly, out of those 21 million people, only around 10% of them will ever receive treatment for their addiction or substance use disorder. For those who are able to receive treatment, they know that it can sometimes be a bumpy road to recovery. But ultimately, they know that recovery is also very rewarding, especially once they are able to get to a point where they can manage their addiction and achieve meaningful sobriety. This can be especially difficult in the case of a dual diagnosis, where an underlying mental health problem is compounding their own personal struggle with addiction.

What is a dual diagnosis, exactly?

For those who are new to recovery, or for those who have never received professional help for their addiction or substance abuse, they may be unaware of these underlying mental health problems that only serve to amplify their issues with their alcohol or drug addiction. This is commonly referred to as a dual-diagnosis. Many who are new to recovery often have this very same question, what exactly is a dual diagnosis? Put simply, a dual diagnosis is when someone has both a substance use disorder and an underlying mental health disorder at the same time.

The combination of a substance use disorder and mental illness can become a vicious cycle. Mental health issues, especially if a person is unaware that they are suffering from one, can often drive people to self-medicate, which leads them to abuse drugs or alcohol in order to cope with the symptoms of their mental health disorder. The same goes for people who abuse drugs and alcohol. Substance use disorders can lead to mental health issues even if they weren’t there before that person began using drugs or alcohol. If someone has been diagnosed as having a dual diagnosis, usually the best course of action is to treat them at the same time, as they often play into each other.

What is treatment for a dual diagnosis like?

If you have recently been told that you have a dual diagnosis, or if you have a loved one or family member who has recently been diagnosed with a mental health issue as well as a substance abuse disorder, then please know that you are not alone. A dual diagnosis is very common. A 2019 study found that among adults 18 and onlder, approximately 9.5 million people who had any mental illness (AMI), also suffered from a substance use disorder (SUD). Other studies show that nearly half of all people with a mental health issue will also have a substance use disorder as well. This is perhaps in part due to the related risk factors of both mental health issues and substance use disorders, such as things like genetics, stress, environment, and current or past trauma.

How can doctors tell if someone has a dual diagnosis?

Keep in mind that the majority of health professionals will only be able to accurately diagnose a mental health disorder once the person is clean and sober with no drugs left in their system. This is because many drugs are known to cause side effects that can manifest as mental health issues. However, there are many different mental health disorders that can lead a person down the slippery slope of addiction--many end up trying to self-medicate, either when they are unaware they have a problem, or if they simply are not getting the proper care. However, here are a few mental health disorders that are very common to those who also suffer from substance use disorders:

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Of course, there are many other mental health issues, such as schizophrenia, that if left untreated can cause someone to begin abusing drugs or alcohol.

As mentioned earlier, treatment planning for someone with a dual diagnosis works best when it is specialized to the individual.  While it may seem impossible, we can assure you that it is not. For the best dual diagnosis treatment possible in the Texas area, More Than Rehab can show you the ropes to a successful sobriety while also being able to manage your mental health problems at the same time. There is hope for recovery, and we understand that we could all use a little help, especially in times like these! Call us today. We are open 24/7.

888-249-2191

7 Healthy Foods To Eat While Detoxing From Drugs

Getting sober can be difficult for people who have even what seems to be a mild substance abuse problem. Part of what makes recovery so difficult, is going through the initial drug detox and sometimes painful withdrawals when they first stop using their drug of choice. While many people experience some sort of drug detox or drug withdrawal symptoms, some substances are said to be more severe, such as with alcohol or opioid addictions. What many may not consider when thinking about or going through drug detox is that a healthy diet can help ease this process. The food you eat plays a crucial role in helping to support your body through the process by replacing any sort of lost nutrients. Maintaining a healthy diet during detox can also help deter people from relapsing. So, if you are worried about going through a drug detox, or you are currently undergoing detox, then here are 7 healthy foods to eat while detoxing from drugs and alcohol.

1. Water

Water is extremely crucial for your health, and many people do not get enough of it a day. This is regardless of whether or not they are going through a drug detox.  Staying hydrated while detoxing will help ensure that you are replacing the fluids your body needs in order to function. If water just isn’t really your thing, then that's okay, the most important thing is to stay hydrated during the detox period. You can also drink other fluids, like electrolyte-packed Gatorade or even coconut water. The latter is good, especially when your withdrawal symptoms have been causing you to throw up a lot.

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2. Proteins

Proteins are essential for the normal functioning of our bodies. The protein obtained from consuming animals or plants gets broken down into amino acids which the body uses to repair cells. It is not a secret that drug abuse and addiction wreak havoc on the overall health of our bodies, so proteins are essential when going through a detox. For carnivores, high-protien foods like tuna and chicken are great, because they are also very high in vitamins like B6. For the vegitarians and vegans out there, you can also get plant-based protein from foods like lentils and black beans.

3. Complex Carbs

A lot of time many people do not get sufficient enough nutrition while they are abusing drugs or alcohol, so when they go through detox their body does not have the proper resources it needs to fully recover. By eating tons of complex carbohydrates, you are helping give back to your body what it needs. Not only are carbs a great source of energy for our cells but they also contain a lot of fiber which is extremely helpful to maintain a healthy digestive system. This is especially important to your health while the body is going through a drug detox.

4. Dark Green, Leafy Vegetables

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As a general rule of thumb, the darker the better when it comes to green vegetables, at least in terms of nutrition. Vegetables like spinach, romaine lettuce, kale, and other salad greens are high in antioxidants and vitamins like B6, folic acid, and beta carotene, which your body converts into vitamin A. In fact, collard greens are said to contain more calcium than milk! Vegetables also contain high amounts of fiber, which helps aid in digestive health. A healthy digestive tract is something that can be very beneficial during a drug detox.

5. Healthy Fats

Not only are healthy fats another crucial component in an overall healthy detox diet, but foods high in omega 3 fatty acids have been shown to reduce drug cravings and fight depression. Foods high in healthy fats include things like nuts, fish, seeds, avocados, and certain oils, like olive oil. Foods high in healthy fat will also leave you feeling fuller and more satiated. The importance of ensuring you have enough healthy fats in your diet, especially during detox, cannot be overstated.

6. Bright Fruits and Veggies

Not only is having a colorful and diverse plate important to keeping our senses engaged while eating, but bright fruits and veggies are known to provide more protective health benefits. Bright, deeply colored fruits and veggies are not only packed with nutrients but they also contain phytochemicals. Phytochemicals help fight free radicals that can cause damage to body tissue, cells and even our DNA. Not only that, but foods like papaya, bell peppers, strawberries, oranges, and pineapple are all extremely high in vitamin C.

7. Seaweed

During detox, seaweed may be your best friend. It is recommended that you eat at least two to three ounces a day while detoxing. A key, active ingredient in seaweed is known as sodium alginate. This substance binds to any remnants of the drug still left inside of the body and keeps it from being absorbed. Being a dark green vegetable itself, seaweed is also extremely high in things like, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin A and iron. Seaweed is also a cheap, tasty, low calorie snack.

These are just a few foods you will want to include in your diet if you are going to detox from drugs or alcohol. You also do not, and most likely should not, have to go through this alone. For many people, medical detox is necessary to help ensure patient health and safety. If you are looking for help with this difficult process, then please reach out to us More Than Rehab for help. Our entire staff, even down to the chefs, know just how painful detoxing can be. So let us help ease you through the process.

Suffering from a substance abuse problem, such as drug or alcohol addiction, happens to be very common in our country. So if you or a loved one are going through the same thing, then just know that you are not alone. More importantly, there is no shame in admitting that you need help with an addiction to drugs or alcohol. The first step to getting sober is admitting that you have a problem. For many people, just admitting the problem exists is a huge step, as it requires a lot of courage. Ultimately, a life of sobriety is worth having and many people who embark on the journey end up living healthy and fulfilling lives. We understand how this is possible and we can help you start the process of recovery from drug and alcohol addiction. Please give us a call today. We are here for you and your family, 24/7.

(888) 249-2191

The Military and Drug Use

America is known for having a strong military, whose members are strongly supported by other American citizens, because we recognize that their duty and sacrifice are what allows each of us to enjoy the freedom we all share. Unfortunately, the United States has participated in many conflicts across the globe, most recently in Iraq, in 2003 as a response the 2001 terrorist attacks that took place on American soil on 9/11. American troops are still currently active there, to this day. While many know the long history of the United States, and our involvement in a number of wars, a newer topic in the American discourse is the tumultuous repercussions of these conflicts to our soldier’s mental health. The military and drug use are not mutually-exclusive. Many active duty military personnel and our returning veterans can easily face the very real challenge of developing a substance use disorder.

Military combat veterans and drug use.

Some things that Veterans in our country are forced to deal with, usually upon returning home from war, range from issues like homelessness, unemployment, and mental health disorders such as PTSD (or post-traumatic stress disorder). These issues are certainly not unexpected and they are relatively common. Another issue with members of the military, and their immediate families, are substance abuse disorders, like an addiction or chemical dependence to drugs or alcohol.

Oftentimes, this can go both ways, as the loved one who is a member of the military may develop an addiction overseas or once returning home, or, vice versa, the family members who are not in the military may develop an addiction while their loved one is away at war.

In 2015 alone, more than 30% of active duty military personnel engaged in hazardous drinking behavior or met criteria for an alcohol abuse disorder.

- The Rand Corporation

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What types of drugs are commonly used by military personnel?

Besides alcohol, substances like marijuana and cocaine are also common among active duty service members currently in the military, however, due to the fact that testing positive to a random drug test could lead to a dishonorable discharge, many military members develop problems associated with alcohol or prescription painkillers, commonly prescribed due to injuries from combat or carrying and operating heavy equipment. For instance, during the years of 2001 to 2009, the number of painkillers prescribed to the military more than quadrupled, causing a subsequent rise in opioid use disorders as well. In 2017, one in four active-duty members of the United States military received a prescription for opioids.

According to data collected by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, more than one out of every 10 veterans has a substance abuse disorder of some kind, which is slightly higher than the general population, even more so when just comparing data for male veterans aged 18-25. This number could be attributed to the fact that many veterans will also develop a mental health disorder as well. A recent report found that nearly 30 percent of active duty personnel have a mental health condition requiring treatment, and just under 50 percent of veterans have a mental health condition that also requires treatment.

The negative stigma concerning mental health prevents military and their families from asking for help.

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Another issue for military members is the stigma surrounding mental health and/or addiction. Many times, they are afraid to seek help in fear of what loved ones or other people may think. If you, or a loved one, are struggling with a mental health issue or a substance abuse disorder, please do not hesitate to ask for help! Years of experience has shown that many family members are accepting and more than willing to try to get you the help that you need. You made sacrifices to help defend American freedom, our heritage and values. You deserve to be treated with respect and care, especially when it comes to your mental health.

As always, please feel free to reach out to one of our addiction specialists today!

More Than Rehab is located just outside of Houston, Texas.

We’re always here to offer help when needed!

888-249-2191

Substance abuse among America’s Military Families.

Another important aspect of the military and drug use, is what happens to the family that gets left behind while their loved one is away fighting for the freedom and protection of our country? This is important to consider when talking about the military and drug use, but all too often it seems to get overlooked. A recent survey found that roughly 44% of people in the military are married with children, and approximately 56% are married alone. Numbers estimate that there are more members of military families then there are active duty personnel, where roughly around 1.9 million people in the United States are an immediate part of a military family.

According to the NSDUH (the National Survey on Drug Use and Health), over 30% of military wives aged 18-49 participated in hazardous binge drinking behavior within the last 30 days and over 12 percent reported abusing illicit drugs within the past year. Furthermore, they were much more likely to engage in binge drinking behavior compared to other members of the civilian population. Additionally, 30 percent of military wives aged 18-49 also had a mental health disorder requiring treatment within the last year.

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These rates of substance abuse could be due to a number of reasons: having to juggle all the household responsibilities and take care of the kids all alone while their husbands are away at war. Wondering if their loved one is going to be safe, while deployed to active duty. These things are emotionally traumatic for both parties. Unfortunately, the children of active duty service members are not unaffected by one, or both of their parents being in the military. The same survey showed that nearly 20% of children who had a parent in the military also struggled with a substance abuse disorder of some kind.

While research in this field is still relatively new, it is safe to say that not only are veterans and active members of the military affected, but their family members may be as well. There is honor in serving your country, and there is honor in loving someone who does, but it can come with its own set of consequences.

Here at More Than Rehab, we truly understand substance abuse disorders and specialize in areas like how the military may impact the entire family with things like PTSD and substance abuse disorders. It is important to remember that even though you may be suffering, you are not alone. Let us help you get back on track and show you the way to get your life back. To the members of the military and their families, we appreciate your service to this country and would not hesitate in returning the favor!

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How Much Does Heroin Cost In Texas?

Opioid addiction has increasingly become an epidemic in America in recent history, with many attributing this growing problem to prescription painkillers. These painkillers are being prescribed at a rate. The average price for a single pill of an opioid prescription, like norco or percocets, can run the user anywhere between $8 without insurance to $40 dollars on the street. Since opioids are highly addictive, when people are cut off or run out of their medication, they often turn to the streets for a cheaper alternative. Due to the substance abuse problem with these prescription painkillers, the use of heroin has been widely sold as a cheaper solution. As a result, many users have gotten hooked on the substance after seeing that it also achieves a more intense high.

When looking at the prices of heroin in the United States over the last few years, we have seen it steadily become more cheap and readily available, with the potency levels continuing to rise. Heroin and black tar heroin are illegal substances that mimic the effects of other opiods. They are mainly being trafficked by Mexican drug cartels who smuggle them across the Mexican border and then distribute them illegally throughout American cities, like Texas and Dallas. Due to close proximity with the border, Texas becomes a major hotspot for these cartels to traffic their drugs. Today, more and more often, heroin is being cut with other substances, such as fentanyl (a high strength opioid), in order to drive those prices back up on the street, increasing the profit margin for drug traffickers or other people who are selling heroin.

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While the average price for a “baggie” of heroin can range anywhere between $5-$20 dollars (with many recovered addicts reported having bought 15-20 of these single use bags per day), we must ask ourselves, what is the actual cost of using heroin?

The economic burden America faces when dealing with this categorical problem is estimated to be around 78.5 billion dollars a year due to things like decreased productivity in the workforce, the overwhelming cost of healthcare, addiction rehabilitation treatment costs, and criminal justice involvement. Not only can a heroin addiction have a detrimental impact on the economy, it can wreak havoc on the users finances as well, costing the average addict anywhere between $438 to $1,750 per week.

However, once the addiction to heroin has taken hold, it will not stop to ask the price that anyone is willing to pay, because unfortunately, with many addicts, no price is too high. They do not see the impact their addiction is having on the world around them. An addiction to heroin will take as much as the user is willing to give, which in most cases, can and will be everything. Heroin will not stop at taking your job, your car, your money, your family, your home, your health, your appearance, your friends and in most cases, it will even take your life. Addiction is a powerful disease that will continue to take and take, until either the user has gotten help from a substance abuse treatment program or has died from their disease altogether. 

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Heroin is a high strength, extremely addictive and highly dangerous opioid that it is one of the leading causes of death in America, with Texas being one of the states most heavily impacted by its usage. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, more than 130 people in the United States alone die from an overdose on opioids every single day, with Texas attributing to about 5% of that number. In 2017, Texas had around 2,199 reported deaths related to an opioid overdose, coming in 5th on the list behind states like Florida and New York. 

Addiction from heroin can affect any region, race, and age demographic. Surprisingly enough though, in Texas during the year of 2017, the age group most affected by opioid overdoses were people aged 55 and above, followed by young adults who were aged 25-34. With up to 80% of people who struggle with a prescription painkiller dependency that may turn to heroin, one can not be surprised by these staggering numbers.

In response to this crisis, the US department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has been focusing its efforts on these major areas; 

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The National Institute on Health (NIH), a component of the US Department of Health and Human Services, also met with major pharmaceutical companies in 2017 in order to help solve this problem. In these meetings, they discussed alternative methods for the treatment of pain, like non addictive alternatives, ways to prevent opioid misuse, and how to effectively manage opioid abuse disorders or how to avoid altogether.

We hope that in time, with these combined efforts, this problem in America will begin to subside. Until more people are willing to seek help, many will remain affected. With drug overdoses from heroin and other opioids still on the rise, we urge those suffering to reach out for assistance if they are struggling with getting clean or staying sober. No one is safe from becoming a part of this epidemic. 

The time to get clean is today. The longer an addiction is left unchecked the harder it is to overcome. When an addiction is allowed to thrive for an extended period of time, the chance for overdose escalates as the users tolerance begins to increase along with the amount of time being spent on getting high. The one and only lasting cure for any type of drug addiction is to lead a life of sobriety. If you or a loved one are suffering from withdrawal symptoms or are unable to stop taking drugs or alcohol please reach out to More Than Rehab.

(888) 249-2191

Why is Alcohol Harder to Quit than Other Drugs?

If you have ever struggled with quitting alcohol and drugs, then you know how difficult it can be, especially around the holidays. Overcoming an addiction and staying sober are essential to leading a healthy and fulfilling life. For those who do not know, addiction is considered to be a disease of the brain that can permanently alter the brain's circuitry patterns and affects how the brain functions on a daily basis. It is often characterized by the inability to stop using drugs or alcohol despite the user having experienced severe and negative consequences throughout their lives. While any addiction is hard to overcome, there are some that are more difficult than others.

What can make a substance more difficult to quit is how addictive it is. Alcohol or drug addiction is formed when the brain begins to depend on the excess release of certain chemicals, like dopamine, due to the use of drugs or alcohol. These chemicals send signals back and forth between neurons, helping to establish good habits that are normally dependent on survival, such as eating or having sex. When a person takes drugs or alcohol, they are releasing the same chemicals inside the brain that give us feelings of pleasure, essentially tricking our brain into believing that we need drugs or alcohol in order to survive. The repeated release of these chemicals without a natural reward is what eventually causes a person to become addicted, although, sometimes all it takes is just one time for someone to develop a substance abuse problem.

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Alcohol and Factors for Addiction

It can be difficult to determine how addictive a drug is to any one person, but in the United States alone, alcohol is the most commonly used and addictive substance. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, over 14 million people in the United States over the age of 18 suffered from an alcohol addiction in the year of 2017. That translates to 1 in 8 Americans experiencing an addiction to alcohol. Furthermore, 1.8 percent of youth aged 12-17 also suffered from a problem with alcohol abuse that year. With so many other harmful substances out there, why is it that alcohol seems to remain the biggest problem for addiction in America? Research and science has shown that there are 5 common factors for addictiveness when it comes to drugs and alcohol.

If you are experiencing withdrawal symptoms of any kind from alcohol, it is always suggested you seek professional care as any number of complications can arise. Delirium Tremens are the most severe form of alcohol withdrawal and, out of those who experience them, 5-25% of people will die without medical treatment.

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With all these factors combined, it is not difficult to understand why alcohol is one of the hardest drugs to quit. Not only is it commonly accepted but it is widely available and has many common misconceptions about its use. Even many members of the US military and their families are prone to alcohol abuse. No one deserves to struggle with an addiction by themselves, if you or someone you know are having a difficult time quitting drugs or alcohol, then we are here to help. A new life begins with making one simple step and there is life without drugs or alcohol.

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Does Your Insurance Affect Your Drug Rehab Choices?

For most people, the cost of certain medical procedures are a major concern as the coverage for insurance can vary among providers. Unfortunately, the question for the cost of a drug treatment facility is no different. Perhaps you or a loved one are struggling with an addiction and now you are wondering what the cost may be and whether or not it is covered by your insurance.

It is never a good feeling when someone has to wonder whether or not they can afford the cost of going to rehab for an addiction to drugs or alcohol, but if you do find yourself in that situation, just know that you are not alone. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 19.7 million Americans aged 12 and older suffered from a substance use disorder in the year of 2017. Furthermore, out of those 19.7 million people who had reported having an addiction in 2017, only 19% of them had received substance abuse treatment of some kind. If you are one of those many americans still suffering, then we are here to help! There are many treatment options available.

If you are wondering if your insurance company can help cover any of the cost for treatment, then do not worry, thankfully, through the Affordable Care Act, every health insurance provider must offer coverage for substance use disorder services.

What is the Affordable Care Act?

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), also commonly referred to as Obamacare, was first signed into legislature in March of 2010. It defines 10 essential health benefits, one of them being services for substance abuse disorders and behavioral health, meaning that health insurance companies could no longer deny coverage for these type of services. It also extended coverage to millions of uninsured Americans and helped to lower the cost of health care. Also, due to the passing of this health reform, people cannot be denied based upon pre-existing mental health conditions or substance abuse disorders.

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How Health Insurance Affects Rehab Choices

While having health insurance is a benefit when looking for drug and alcohol treatment, it can still affect your choices for a drug rehabilitation facility. There are many reasons why your insurance may affect your choice when thinking about admitting a loved one or yourself for treatment, one of them being the amount of coverage that is offered by your specific insurance plan and the individual insurance benefits that come along with it. Some insurance companies may have out-of-pocket expenses or additional copays, while others may cover the cost of treatment completely. Be sure to speak with your provider for more details.

Cost of Rehab

The cost of drug rehabilitation alone can greatly affect the options someone may have when considering drug rehabilitation. The cost for treatment can depend on many factors, including;

The type of insurance you have, the deductible and copay can play a huge role in selecting the treatment facility that is best suited for your or your loved one.

In-Network/Out-of-Network

Another thing to consider when looking for the best option available is whether the specific treatment facility is considered to be in-network or out-of-network. In-network health insurance means that the specific provider has been approved for coverage and is typically contracted at a specific rate, helping to reduce costs. Out-of-network facilities have not been approved for coverage so it will not help in reducing cost for treatment. However, if there is a preferred option that is out-of-network, cash may cover any additional expenses needed to attend.

Length of Stay

The length of stay can also have a huge impact on where a person decides to check into for drug rehabilitation. While most insurance companies only offer coverage for 30 days, medical professionals at rehab facilities will work with insurance companies to extend that coverage for the needed stay for the intended individuals to have a full and healthy recovery.

How to Get Treatment Without Insurance

Statistics show that one of the many reasons why people do not seek treatment when it is needed is because they do not have insurance. What they may not know is that sometimes insurance is not necessary in order to get treatment. Here are some ways to get treatment without insurance:

Research suggests that for every dollar spent on substance abuse treatment, it saves $4 dollars in medical expenses and $7 in law enforcement and criminal justice costs. Finding a way to pay for treatment not only helps to save your life but will also save you money in the long run on expenses like medical treatments, court costs, and further loss of income related to drug use.

The sooner you reach out for help for either yourself or a loved one, the sooner the healing process can begin. There are many treatment services available that are designed to fit the needs of the individual. We will work with you, with or without insurance, to ensure that you are getting the best care needed for you or your loved ones recovery.

(888) 249-2191

What is the Difference Between Cocaine and Crack Cocaine?

While cocaine first became popular in pop culture around the 1970’s, it is one of the oldest drugs in the world, as the leaves from the coca plant have been chewed for thousands of years. Originating in South America, the Erythroxylon coca plant was used as a stimulating medicinal product; elevating mood, aiding in digestion and suppressing appetite. The production of these plants were restricted mainly to areas where it was naturally grown, places like Columbia, Peru, and Bolivia, until the mid 19th century when American pharmaceutical companies began exploring the region. At first considered safe, the destructive and addictive qualities of the coca plant became apparent within 30 years of its introduction as a pharmaceutical product.

Cocaine is a central nervous system drug that is extremely addictive. Today, It is considered to be one of the top five most addictive drugs in the United States. According to a survey conducted in 2014 by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, there were an estimated 1.5 million Americans who had used cocaine within the last month. Furthermore, roughly around 913,000 people in the United States had met enough criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders for dependence or abuse of cocaine in any form.

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When talking about cocaine, there are a couple of terms that may be thrown around regarding the drug, such as cocaine and crack cocaine. While it is easy to lump the two together since they are almost molecularly identical, there are still a few differences that keep them from being the same.

Molecular Differences Between Crack and Cocaine

In its natural form, when it is extracted from the coca plant, cocaine is a hydrochloride salt. At first, the substance is refined into a paste and eventually pressed into a white powder. This substance is the powdered form of cocaine and is often snorted, mixed with a liquid then injected, or smoked. Crack cocaine, otherwise known as crack, is essentially the same substance but in a different form. The process of making crack cocaine involves mixing the white powder with a base, usually baking soda, and then boiling it with water. The baking soda is removed, along with the hydrochloride, during this process making the substance more concentrated as the psychoactive chemical of cocaine is the only thing left behind. Crack gets its name from the crackling noise it makes while being smoked. Cocaine and crack cocaine are both extremely dangerous as often times pure cocaine can be cut with other harmful substances, like laundry detergent or laxatives, in order to increase profits or to create the substance known as crack.

Other Differences Between Cocaine and Crack Cocaine

Aside from the slight change in their molecular structures, there are still a few key differences between cocaine and crack cocaine.

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Both cocaine and crack cocaine increase the amount of dopamine released in the brain, causing a rush of euphoria when abused. However, since crack is more potent, their side effects can differ from one another.

Side effects of Cocaine Can Include

Side Effects of Crack Cocaine Can Include

Since crack cocaine is more potent, there is an increased risk of overdose but both drugs can kill you when taking too much. Long term use of both substances can lead to life threatening conditions such as respiratory failure, infectious disease, fatal overdose, strokes, hallucinations, and addiction.

Anyone can become addicted to either of these substances, even after just one use. Cocaine use has long been glorified in movies and sold as the “rich man's drug”, making it appealing to any age, race, or demographic. Withdrawal symptoms can become severe when discontinuing use of any of these substances. If you, a loved one, or someone you know is a cocaine user and is unsure about whether or not they are addicted, or are becoming dependent, that is usually a good sign that some level of help is necessary. There is always a chance for recovery and you do not have to struggle alone. Reach out to us for help today to begin your journey on the road to a healthier and happier life.

(888) 249-2191

How Much Does Crystal Meth Cost in Texas?

When looking at the average price of crystal meth, the street value can vary from city to city, state to state, region to region. Due to our close proximity to the source of 90 percent of the meth available in the United States, the price of meth is typically lower in Texas, than in many other parts of the country. Most of the methamphetamine available in the United States comes across the southern border with Mexico. Due to government crackdowns in the early and mid 2000’s, much of the domestic manufacturing of meth dried-up. This brought a booming business opportunity to Mexican drug cartels and now they are flooding communities in Texas and the US with cheap, highly potent crystal meth.

But how much does meth cost? An addiction to crystal meth will cost as much as you are willing to give. Your home, your family, your job, your friends, your car, your health, even your life. Crystal meth addiction can be very expensive, not just for your pocket book, but a long-term addiction to meth can literally cost you your livelihood and your life.

According to the RAND Corporation, methamphetamine and amphetamine abuse costs the United States roughly $23.4 billion dollars per year. This data was compiled to develop consistent analysis of the many casual associations for the multitude of different harms associated with this deadly drug. Due to the nature of the data available (the most recent year being 2005) researchers created a range of estimates for the total societal cost of methamphetamine abuse in the United States:

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Taking all of these factors into account, crystal meth addiction costs much more than would be readily imaginable. Accidental drug overdose death, lost productivity in the workforce, meth addiction rehabilitation services, criminal justice system costs, child endangerment and production hazards from meth labs (chemical poisoning, explosions, property damage, etcetera) all create enormous costs associated with this devastating drug.

Crystal meth is not only highly addictive, it is also the leading cause of drug overdose death in Texas.

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An addiction to crystal meth can overtake your entire life. While rehab can be difficult, it is worth it.

Methamphetamine is a powerful stimulant that has been shown to release up to four times as much dopamine in the brain as cocaine. Because it is much cheaper than even crack cocaine, meth has become a very popular drug throughout many different segments of the population. It’s not just in the big cities, like Houston, Dallas or San Antonio. Meth is also a major problem for rural communities across Texas and the nation as a whole.

Due to the relative costs of meth, compared with other stimulants like cocaine, or even Adderall, meth is growing in popularity, regardless of the multiple dangers associated with its use. Even many street drug users have switched from crack cocaine to crystal meth, because it is much cheaper and the high typically lasts much longer. Even though the addict may think they are saving money by switching to methamphetamine, yet a typical meth addict can spend anywhere from $10,000, up to $40,000 per year on acquiring the drug according to conservative estimates. Some estimates state that a person who has developed a long-term addiction can spend up to $74,000 a year on their meth habit.

It’s not just financial costs that make methamphetamine a major problem for many Texas residents. Stimulants, like crystal meth kill more Texans every year than any other type of drug. Meth kills even more people than prescription and illicit opioids do. One of the major reasons for this is that there aren’t any life-saving medications for a meth overdose, like there are for other drugs. For instance, in the case of an opioid overdose, first responders and emergency personnel have the drug Narcan (naloxone) at their disposal. This is an opioid antagonist, that can block the brain’s opioid receptors and essentially reverse the affects of an opioid overdose.

For stimulants like methamphetamine, there is no overdose-reversing drug available. First responders often have trouble with meth overdoses, because many times the subject may be unconscious. This makes it hard for the emergency technicians to determine what is happening to the person. Often with a meth overdose, the person had been using multiple substances so it makes it difficult to determine the best approach to emergency medical care. All of these factors contribute to the increase of meth-related overdose deaths in Texas.

Treatment for meth addiction is available. Recovery is possible.

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Treating an addiction to methamphetamine is never an easy task. While a lot of focus has been on the opioid epidemic, meth use is silently roaring back into popularity all across American communities. Where federal funding has been pouring out into these communities to help fight the ongoing opioid crisis, little resources are made available to fight the scourge of methamphetamine abuse that is sweeping the nation.

This is unfortunate as the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) says that methamphetamine is currently the number one threat to Houston and the rest of the state. The number of overdose deaths, emergency room visits, treatment admissions and law enforcement seizures are all much higher than they are for heroin, which is the number two threat to Texas residents.

This crisis is compounded by the fact that there is no FDA-approved medication currently available to treat a methamphetamine addiction. Researchers at the University of Texas are currently working on a clinical trial for a two-medication treatment that is designed to block the euphoric affects of crystal meth and to reduce the painful symptoms associated with meth withdrawal.

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It's never easy to quit using drugs, especially crystal meth. Addiction Recovery is possible however, with the right help.

The withdrawal symptoms are a major reason many who struggle with an addiction to meth are afraid to seek treatment. The crash that comes with stopping the use of the drug can be seemingly unbearable. Lethargy, massive mood swings and depression are all very extreme in the case of a meth withdrawal. Sometimes the patient can become violently ill. The fear of the crash is why many people continue their use, even when they really, really want to quit.

If you or a loved one is experiencing an addiction to methamphetamine, you should know that the best time to quit is right now. The longer a meth addiction goes untreated, the more likely severe medical issues can take place. These dangers include accidental overdose death. 715 people in Texas died from an overdose on methamphetamine in 2017 and 320 sought emergency medical attention. There’s no reason this could be yourself or your loved one someday if the addiction continues.

Please give us a call today. At More Than Rehab, we offer a full-spectrum of services to not only help you overcome your addiction, but to help you rebuild your life. Our social model of addiction recovery was designed to help you prepare yourself to live a lifetime of sobriety, long after you leave our drug rehabilitation program. We know how much damage can be done with a long-term binge on crystal meth. Our experienced, compassionate staff is here to help you in every way possible, beginning with a full medical detox. Don’t wait another day, call us right away. We are available 24/7 to help you when you’re ready.

(888) 249-2191

Crystal Meth is Making a Worrisome Comeback in Texas

While the news headlines are dominated by the opioid epidemic ravaging the United States, crystal meth is making a relatively silent, but deadly return. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the rate of overdose deaths for methamphetamine more than tripled from 2011 to 2016 and that number keeps growing to this day. This is partly due to the increase of cheap, highly potent methamphetamine coming over the US/Mexico border. With the national attention and focus on opioids by public health officials, politicians and government agencies, meth has quietly made a comeback in the US. This likely will not change course, without the proper resources and greater public awareness of the nation’s problems associated with crystal meth.

When drug overdoses began to take more American lives each year than gun violence or car accidents, the attention (and funding) from federal, state and local governments was largely focused on prescription and illicit opioids. The good news is that these efforts may actually be working.

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New provisional CDC data shows that drug overdose deaths fell significantly in 2018. This is the first decrease in decades. From the data, it appears that government efforts to prevent doctors from over-prescribing, while making it easier for first-responders to carry naloxone (a life-saving opioid-antagonist) undoubtedly have helped make a real difference in the fight to curb drug overdose deaths.

With prescription painkiller abuse on the decline, drug overdose deaths from crystal meth and fentanyl are the new problem in the United States.

Unlike illicit and prescription opiates, methamphetamine addiction does not have any FDA-approved medications to assist in treatment and rehabilitation efforts. Drugs like buprenorphine, or Suboxone are available to help ease the symptoms of opioid withdrawal. These evidence-based, medication-assisted treatments (MAT) can also help reduce the likelihood for relapse later in recovery. By blocking opioid receptors in the brain, MATs are valuable tools for addiction treatment programs. These medications have shown a verifiable success rate in patients who are struggling with an addiction to opiates.

Meth on the other hand, can cause equally painful and severe withdrawal symptoms. Currently there are no medications available to ease the withdrawal symptoms associated with a physical or psychological chemical dependency to methamphetamine. Detox and treatment for an addiction to methamphetamine can therefore be quite difficult for most patients.

Another problem with the relative lack of effective treatment options for people who become addicted to meth, the ease of access to meth is currently at an all time high. In the 1990’s and early 2000’s we witnessed a major crackdown on illegal meth labs operating within the United States. Meth labs were quite prevalent in Texas, especially in the Houston and San Antonio areas. These ranged from very small operations in an RV in the desert or in someone’s garage, to giant meth super labs in warehouses. Once the Federal Government began imposing stricter regulations on the sale and availability of pseudoephedrine (Sudafed), meth manufacturing labs pretty much became extinct in the US.

These days, the major Mexican drug cartels supply most of the crystal meth that is found in American cities and rural areas. This meth is much cheaper and more potent than ever before. The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) reports that the current price of meth is the lowest they’ve seen in years. The Mexican drug cartels, with new manufacturing techniques are also producing meth that’s more than 90 percent pure. This highly-potent crystal meth is creating an entirely new generation of addicts across the nation, at a level of epidemic proportions.

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For comparison, in 2017, 813 people died from an overdose on crystal meth, while 591 died from a heroin overdose in Texas.

One of the major complications with a substance use disorder is that the patient can be using multiple substances at any given time. Emergency responders have a difficult time with drug overdoses, because while the patient may be unconscious they have no idea how to treat the overdose. Many people who use crystal meth, are also using other substances as well. Some end up using methamphetamine in the morning and opioids at night, while trying to balance a ‘normal’ lifestyle through the use of various different drugs.

Many of the fatal overdose deaths involving methamphetamine can also be partially blamed on opioids. The extremely dangerous synthetic opiate, fentanyl has been frequently found in different batches of methamphetamine all over the country. This contamination may be intentional, or it may be the result of drug labs that produce and package different substances, where cross-contamination of different drugs may be entirely by accident.

What are the different drug rehab options for someone who is addicted to crystal meth?

The addiction treatment specialists at More Than Rehab have helped people all types of people, many of whom are struggling with an addiction to multiple substances. Our comprehensive drug rehabilitation program can help people with any type of addiction, while we can even address the underlying causes of substance abuse. We see the addiction is often just a symptom of another deeply-rooted mental health issue. This is called a dual-diagnosis and our staff is well-equipped to help people who exhibit both a substance use disorder, along with an underlying mental health issue.

Our approach to meth addiction treatment focuses on making the whole person healthy, mentally, physically and spiritually. Often an addiction is merely a symptom of unresolved trauma that has led the patient to self-medicate, while they attempt to drown-out their sorrows. Since no medication assisted treatment exists specifically to treat a meth addiction, our facility uses a robust combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), group therapy, contingency management and relapse prevention. A variety of other treatment techniques could be used in conjunction with these, depending on the patient’s own unique, individual needs.

If you, a family member, friend or loved one are struggling with any type of drug addiction, please give us a call as soon as possible. The longer you wait to get substance abuse treatment, the harder it can be to quit. Most people who die as a result of complications from meth abuse are from a brain hemorrhage, seizure, or a heart attack. This is especially true for older addicts, as their bodies are no longer equipped to handle a long-term episode of substance abuse.

It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been using, or how much you have used in the past. More Than Rehab can help addiction at any level of severity. If this has been a wake-up call for either yourself, or your family, or friends, please talk to someone about the problem as soon as possible. Addiction won’t go away by itself. When you’re ready to change your life for the better, give us a call. We are available 24/7 to help you when you need it.

888-249-2191