Should I Be Afraid of Rehab?

Addiction affects almost every part of your life. Admitting that you have an addiction problem is the first step toward recovery. Denial is a large part of addiction, and breaking through self-deception is very difficult. So, if you’ve reached a point where you accept that drugs and alcohol are a serious problem in your life, then you’ve probably dealt with the hardest part. Rehabilitation is only a small part of it, yet many can be afraid of rehab. It's a huge life-changer and it can be difficult, but that shouldn't discourage you.

Addiction is a chronic disease that changes the way the brain functions. You may no longer have control of how you feel or act. But you should know that this isn’t about willpower or morals – it’s about acknowledging that you need help and accepting it.

It’s normal to have fears about rehab. Millions of others also fear joining rehabs for various reasons. So much so that only 10% of 20.4 million people with substance use disorders sought out addiction treatment in 2019. But fears only get in the way of sober living. Joining an addiction treatment center is going to be your best shot at addiction recovery.

But still, no one wants to join drug addiction treatment programs – at least not at first. Rehab is a scary thought for many families and people who struggle with addiction. The word itself comes with a huge stigma, and the idea of joining a facility for residential treatment can be equally overwhelming.

Also, joining rehab means letting go of substances, leaving the comforts of your home, and starting a new life. It means giving up control and embracing change. But as they say, change is as good as rest.

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Common fears about rehab

Fear of detox and withdrawal

The thought of detox or withdrawal symptoms can be intimidating, especially if you’ve experienced them before or have heard stories. While withdrawal isn’t going to be your cup of tea, there are many ways to make it comfortable and tolerable. Treatment programs offer full-time help and access to medications and therapies to ensure you are pain-free. You’ll also be monitored by trained medical staff throughout your entire detox process.

Fear of leaving behind your life

Walking away from your comfort zone – your family, home, job, friends, or even substances can be scary. After all, you are leaving behind your life as you’ve known it and heading towards the unknown. But while this thought can be overwhelming, treatment is way less damaging than staying and continuing with your using habits. If the people you’re scared to leave behind care about you, they will be happy to see you get help.

Just ensure that everything is in order so that your only concern is to sober up. Arrange care for your elderly parents, children, or pets. Apply for the 12 weeks of family and medical leave to protect your work and sign up for automatic bill payments. The goal is to leave bills, jobs, and drama outside so you can focus more on getting better.

Fear of missing out (FOMO)

FOMO is one of the most common fears many people who struggle with addiction deal with before going to rehab. The illusion that drugs and alcohol go hand in hand with fun can make you skeptical about getting help. You may feel as though you’ll miss out on weekends, or after work, and so on. There’s also the aspect of friends; how they’ll hang out without you and how boring your life will get without them.

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All these can be overwhelming, making you afraid of rehab and what happens afterwards. But substance abuse only leads to addiction, legal issues, financial troubles, broken relationships, etc. Unless you break free, you really won’t have a clear perspective of what fun means. Once you go through rehab, you’ll make new friends, learn new things, take up a hobby, travel, and even spend more time with loved ones. You’ll also identify fun activities that aren’t harmful to your health and relations.

Fear of not knowing how to cope with anxiety and stress

If you fall into the 50% category of those who experience substance use disorder due to mental health issues, you may fear that you won’t know how to cope once you stop using. But the good news is that treatment facilities often offer 12-step programs to help you resolve most of the underlying issues. They also offer holistic treatments to address mind, body, and soul. On top of that, they point you to support groups to serve as your sounding board, so there's no need to be afraid of rehab.  

Fear of dealing with past trauma, neglect, or abuse

Many aspects – including childhood neglect, abuse, and trauma – might have contributed to your substance use disorder. Perhaps you’ve been suppressing the difficult past, but now you’re dealing with the prospect of facing it as part of the healing process.

It is scary to face the ghost of the past, but you won’t do it alone. Treatment centers have counselors who will hold your hand throughout the process. You’ll also have access to group therapy and other treatment options to help you process thoughts, emotions, and beliefs linked to the past trauma. In the end, the past won’t have a grasp on you.

Fear of starting a new life

Without drugs or alcohol, you may have no idea what you are, and that’s a scary place to be. But this is only temporary. During treatment and early recovery, you’ll be able to step out of your comfort zone and try new stuff. You’ll also hang out with sober friends and family and create new experiences. This might be a great time to try out new hobbies and interests.

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Fear of failure

One of the main reasons most people are afraid of rehab is the fear of failure. The thought of going through a treatment plan but ending up with a relapse is devastating. But failing to try because you fear failing is denying yourself an opportunity to lead a clean life. In fact, you may be shocked by how well you respond to treatment.

And even if you relapse, it is still a step in the right direction. The National Institute on Drug Abuse shows that 40-60% of people with addiction relapse after treatment. Should you relapse, it’s vital to point out the triggers and find a way to avoid placing yourself in similar situations again.

Fear of success

Perhaps you’ve done things in the past that you aren’t proud of and feel like you have to punish yourself or be unhappy forever. Or maybe you suffered in the hands of someone who said you didn’t deserve happiness or that you wouldn’t amount to anything, and you believed them. So you’re always self-sabotaging to avoid success.

But everyone deserves a shot at happiness. Embrace your fears and not run away from them. Treatment centers have experts who will reinforce positive mental health and help you overcome any trauma that may have affected you. There is no need to be afraid of rehab. Depending on the rehab, the treatment plan may also include a faith-based approach to help you connect with your higher power to overcome addiction.

The Link Between Music and Drugs

A good number of musicians have used drugs to augment their creativity. Their fans, on the other hand, may use drugs to intensify the pleasure they get from music. This has been the norm for centuries, leading to intensive research on the link between music and drugs.

On the surface, music and drugs are like two different worlds. However, the two have a lot in common; including the way they affect the human brain. Drugs and music trigger the release of dopamine and serotonin.

These are the same feel-good hormones that saturate your brain when you have sex, eat junk food, or do something you love. Dopamine and serotonin make you feel happy and contented. They also boost your energy levels and sharpen your sensory perception.

When you combine drugs and music, your brain’s function and the surrounding culture merge to give you a unique and euphoric experience. That’s because the two augment each other to make the experience even better. It’s a good reason why clubs and substances go hand-in-hand. People go to the club to listen to music, use drugs or do both. 

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But the similarity between drugs and music doesn’t stop there. 

Music and drugs – a mutual relationship

As mentioned earlier, drugs and music thrive off each other. But not all music pairs with all drugs. As it turns out, some genres work with some types of drugs. For example, hard rock does well with LSD, while reggae does well with weed.

That’s because of the response this music triggers. When people use weed, they feel relaxed and want to dance to slow jams, like reggae. LSD is quite the opposite – it makes them want to shake vigorously, which explains why they prefer EDM music.

How music matches the effects of drugs

Music can mimic the specific effects of drugs. For example, fast and repetitive music matches amphetamine because users can dance quickly due to the stimulation. Ecstasy gives one a feeling of pleasure through dance and body movement; hence, it matches repetitive music.

The link between music and drugs is a complex relationship. However, there is a rich drug representation in popular music. Studies have shown that listeners of specific music genres abuse drugs more than listeners of other genres. 

Musicians, fans, and drug use

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It is not uncommon for musicians and songwriters to compose lyrics that reflect their relationship with drugs. Others even go all out to promote illicit and prescription drug use. The Acid Queen, by Tina Turner and The Who for example, talks about how LSD makes one more alive. To quote the lyrics:

If your child ain't all he should be now

 This girl will put him right

 I'll show him what he could be now

 Just give me one night

I'm the gypsy, the acid queen

 Pay me before I start

 I'm the gypsy and I'm guaranteed

 To mend his aching heart

Give us a room, close the door

 Leave us for a while

 You won't be a boy no more

 Young, but not a child

I'm the gypsy, the acid queen

 Pay me before I start

 I'm the gypsy, I'm guaranteed

 To tear your soul apart

Gather your wits and hold them fast

 Your mind must learn to roam

 Just as the gypsy queen must do

 You're gonna hit the road

My work's been done, now look at him

 He's never been more alive

 His head it shakes, his fingers clutch

 Watch his body writhe

With such lyrics, it’s easy to see why fans may want to try out this acid, especially it comes from their favorite artists. 

In the 1980s and 1990s, the high availability of molly and ecstasy made house music appealing to the then generation. The same thing happened with LSD and acid rock. Artists performing would take an addictive substance or chemical substances before going on stage for live performances. If you have gone to live music events, music shows, or concerts, you may have seen artists under the influence performing on stage. 

Listening to music while under the influence

Music tends to enhance the “high” effects of drugs. Research has shown that drugs can alter one’s experience of music. For instance, clinical trials that administered LSD to volunteers revealed LSD elevates music-induced emotion, with participants reporting feelings of tenderness, power, wonder, and superiority. Other studies found that LSD modulates music-evoked imagery through changes in parahippocampal connectivity.

Social bonds

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Both music and drugs are tools that strengthen social bonds. They give listeners and drug users a sense of identity. Simply put, music and drugs make people connect, be it socially or politically. 

Most people form peer groups with people they share cultural preferences with. Therefore, it is easy to see why they interlink music with drugs of their choice. Even though people easily associate certain drugs with specific music genres, it is evident that drugs are a minor element of a much broader identity. The drugs distinguish one group from the other.

Does music promote drug abuse?

There is a link between music and drugs. However, you mustn’t assume music leads to drug abuse or drug addiction. 

Lyrics of various songs occasionally refer to drugs and have a drug use culture surrounding them. This raised concerns about the long-term effects music glorifying drug use has on young listeners. 

One study showed that the youth positively associate music with illicit drug use and alcohol abuse. However, the study could not determine whether the listener’s behavior influenced their music preferences or whether their music preferences influenced their behavior.

There is a slight chance that drug use could influence a person’s music choice and vice versa. Whichever way the influence goes, it may lead to drug addiction. Drug addiction can lead to several disorders, including mental disorders and high blood pressure.

If someone you know is battling drug abuse, help them seek medical advice on dealing with the issue. Addiction is a chronic disease, but there are several treatment options available.

Treatment options for drug addiction

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Treatment for drug addiction should help the individual stop using drugs, remain drug-free, and be a productive member of society.

As mentioned, there are several treatment options for drug addiction. They include:

For drug addiction treatment to be successful, one needs to have a tailored treatment program with follow-up options. The patient's follow-up care can be family-based or community-based.

Conclusion

There is a link between music and drugs, but you mustn’t assume that listening to a specific music genre would influence you to take drugs. Those who get addicted to drug use should seek help for them to be rehabilitated.

Why Do People Get High?

In today’s crazy world it may seem like more and more people are reaching for drugs and alcohol to get high, in order to help them cope with the struggles of our "new normal". Thanks to the Coronavirus pandemic that our country is still facing, alcoholism and relapse rates are once again on the rise. Unfortunately, this is due to a multitude of different reasons like self-quarantine, isolation, boredom, change in routine and schedule, closures of local AA or NA support groups, and even having kids home full time, or being around your partner 24/7. All of these are stressful situations which could lead even the strongest willed person to have their long-lasting sobriety to come to an end.

Though COVID-19 has certainly caused a surge in relapse rates, alcoholism, and drug use, that certainly doesn’t mean that substance abuse problems weren’t a problem before 2020. In fact, it is estimated that every year, nearly 21 million Americans will suffer from a substance abuse problem of some kind. With so many people affected, it may be easy to wonder why do people get high in the first place? Well, for someone who has ever struggled with an addiction firsthand, they may know that sometimes the answer to that question is simple… But sometimes, the answer to that question is much more complicated. While we certainly cannot find one or two primary reasons people choose to get high, we can isolate some of the more common reasons people turn to drugs or alcohol.

Here are some of the most popular reasons why people, especially teens and young adults, get high:

Boredom

We are all pretty familiar with being bored, perhaps today even more so than ever before with practically everything moving online and becoming virtual. Sometimes, when a person is left to one’s own devices, it can be pretty easy to see the temptation in trying drugs or alcohol just for the sake of having something to do. That is why drugs and alcohol are so dangerous around young teens and adults because they are particularly susceptible to boredom.

Curiosity

We have all probably heard the saying, “Curiosity killed the cat” -- and while trying drugs and alcohol likely won't kill you the first time, it still most certainly could. With dangerous drugs like fentanyl being laced in some common street drugs, a drug overdose death is more likely now, than ever.

Beginning with something as simple as wanting to know what it feels like to be high or get drunk, can end up leading someone down that path of a lifetime of hurt caused by an addiction to drugs or alcohol. If curiosity ever strikes, it is best to remember that there is no way to tell who will become addicted to drugs or alcohol and that even one time could lead to an addiction.

The Desire to Belong

As humans, we all have an innate desire to fit in or belong. For teens and young adults, this is even more important. According to a recent survey, nearly 29% of teens said they had tried drugs or alcohol because their friends were also doing it. It seems that friends can play a huge role in determining whether or not a teen or young adult will eventually try drugs or alcohol for the first time. The same can be said for adults as well, something as simple as changing jobs and getting asked to go out for drinks with your new coworkers and agreeing, even though you have been sober for a year, could potentially be a huge relapse trigger for anyone.

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Peer Pressure in Social Situations

Along the same lines as the desire to belong is peer and social pressure. A lot of times people, especially teens and young adults, try drugs or alcohol for the first time because of pressure from their peers. Even though someone may initially say no to using drugs and alcohol, pressure from friends can eventually make them give in for fear of being ostracized or outcast. In turn, they may continue using drugs or alcohol even if they don't want to, simply out of the fear of rejection.

Trauma or Abuse

Any past or current trauma and/or abuse, such as a sexual assault, a car accident, childhood neglect, or emotional abuse, can lead anyone to trying drugs or alcohol. Traumatic events can imprint on the memory, making it very difficult to get past the experience. Oftentimes, people get high in an attempt to escape having to deal with the painful emotions associated with the experience.

Career Pressure

Teens and young adults are not the only age group that can fall victim to addiction from environmental pressures. For instance, career pressure can drive someone of any age to get high on drugs or alcohol. A lot of times, people tie their self-worth into their career and if they feel as though they are not living up to their potential or are struggling to meet demands they may turn to drugs and alcohol in order to make themselves feel better.

Dealing With Grief

Losing a loved one is a devastating feeling and grief is an especially painful experience. Living through a loved one’s death is an especially difficult time for people and no two people grieve the same. Unfortunately, many people who are undergoing grief may want to get high, in an attempt to forget about the loved one’s passing. However, while this is normally just a short term coping mechanism it can turn into a life-long problem for those who are not careful.

There are many other reasons why someone may want to get high from drugs or alcohol.

Usually, the reasons are psychological, mental, or physical. Some people use drugs or alcohol in an attempt to self-medicate some sort of mental illness like depression or insomnia. There is also no way to tell who will become addicted to drugs or alcohol, so it is best to try and steer clear of all illicit substances when possible.

If you, or a loved one, are having difficulty with a substance abuse disorder, then we are here to help. Reach out to us today and let our family at More Than Rehab help take care of you, or your loved one who is struggling. We have years of experience and knowledge when it comes to treating substance abuse disorders and many of our staff have been where you are before, so we know what it takes to lead a healthy and fulfilling life of sobriety! Call us anytime. We are available 24/7 and we hope to hear from you soon!

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Common Ways Addicts Store or Hide Their Drugs

Anyone who has ever known or loved an addict knows just how far they would go to continue getting high and they would also never question their ingenuity when it comes to trying to conceal or hide their drugs from others. If there is one thing in common between all people who suffer from the disease of addiction, it would certainly have to be the fact that they all lie, at least in one way or another. Many will tell you until they are blue in the face that they haven’t been using drugs or alcohol, even though they are under the influence at the same time they are telling you that.

For any parent of an addict, it can be extremely difficult to trust or believe your child when they tell you that they are no longer getting high, especially if they haven't changed any of their behaviors or actions. Perhaps you have found drugs and paraphernalia in your child’s bedroom before and insisted that they throw it out, never to be brought back in the house again.

Even though they may have the best of intentions, sometimes quitting drugs and alcohol just isn’t that easy. If you are the parent of a teen, or young adult, and have concerns that they are still abusing drugs or alcohol, then keep reading.

Here are some of the most common ways that addicts hide their drugs.

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Writing Utensils

A popular way that teens hide drugs is inside of writing utensils. While that highlighter sitting on their desk or hiding in their pencil pouch may seem harmless enough, it may be used to store pills, marijuana, or even powdered substances. Simply pop off the back and the highlighter instantaneously turns into a pipe for marijuana. There are many videos on the internet teaching teens or young adults how to do just that.

Prop Soda Bottles, Cans, or Candy Containers

A quick search on the internet will turn up tons of fake items used to conceal or hide drugs. Things like unopened soda bottles, soda cans, or candy boxes can actually be stash spots for drugs. If you see the same soda bottle all the time or the same candy wrapper, try opening it up to see what's really inside. If it is a fake item, it will usually have a place to twist open, revealing a hidden compartment.

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Belt Buckles

Who knew that belt buckles were not just for fashion anymore? Well, apparently, they are often used as a way to conceal drugs. Somehow, people have found a way to change these buckles into a secret compartment to hide their drugs. If you suspect that your child is using their belt buckle to conceal drugs, try flipping it over to see if the back slides off.

Hygiene and Makeup Supplies

That makeup bag on the floor in the bedroom, or on the counter in the bathroom, may be serving a more illicit purpose than you might originally think. A lot of make-up supplies come in a tube that can be hollowed out for drug storage. Things like lipstick, lip balm, deodorant, mascara, or hair products can be great hiding spots for people trying to conceal their drugs.

Posters, Wall Hangings, Picture Frames

Don’t let that seemingly innocent boy band poster fool you, teens or young adults have been known to flatten their drugs and hang them behind posters or other wall hangings. Picture frames also make a great spot to hide their drugs, as they can open up the back and stash them inside. Look for tape that is constantly peeling or a corner that looks like it's been folded back and forth if you suspect your child of hiding drugs.

 

Socks and Shoes

Socks and shoes are also extremely common, but not in the way you might think. While some have been known to stash drugs just inside the sock or the shoe, many also have hidden pockets that can be used to conceal drugs as well. Try looking inside the shoe to determine if there are any other areas that might be used to hide drugs. Socks can also have hidden pockets, so be sure to check those too.

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Vehicles

While not necessarily in the home, vehicles are another common way that people hide their drugs. You may be prone to searching their room, but how often are you checking their car? If you suspect your child of using drugs, it may be wise to thoroughly inspect their vehicle. Check places like behind the dashboard, under the seats, or even under the hood.

Vents and Toilets

Air vents are easy to remove and put back on, making it an ideal spot to put something that isn't meant to be discovered. Another popular place to hide drugs is underneath the toilet tank lid. Both are easy, quick, and inconspicuous options when it comes to concealing drugs. Many would not think to check in the air vent or under the toilet tank lid, which is why these are popular options. A quick look in both of these places may ease your mind if you suspect your child of hiding drugs.

Inhalers

When an item is necessary for one’s health, it tends to fall under even less suspicion. But, nevertheless, inhalers have become a popular place to hide drugs. Once the inhaler has been taken apart, it becomes a clever place to stash drugs. This is a great place to check if you are concerned about your child, especially if the inhaler doesn't belong to them.

Game Consoles or Electronics

For those who are even slightly inclined, storing drugs in game consoles or electronic devices can prove to be very easy. Loosen up a few screws here and a few screws there, then voila, a perfect hiding place for drugs. Look for signs that the electronic has been tampered with or taken apart and put back together.

These are just a few of the most common places that people may use to hide their drugs when they don’t want them to be found. If you suspect your loved one may have developed problem with drugs or alcohol, we are here to help! Our trained addiction specialists at More Than Rehab can help answer any questions you might have. We know how to treat and manage substance abuse disorders, and would love the chance to offer help for your family.

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Drug Usage Can Be Driven By Childhood Trauma

A common question in today’s world is what drives abuse of drugs and alcohol? While the answer to that isn’t exactly a 'one fits all' model, there are many things that can potentially lead to whether or not someone will become an addicted person later on in life. This can include things like genetic predisposition, how old a person is the first time they try drugs or alcohol, peer pressure, their success in school, how stable their home environment is and influence of family members. Of course, this is not an all-inclusive list of what eventually leads an addict to develop an addiction. Research suggests that childhood trauma can also have a significant impact on the likelihood of someone developing an addiction.

Addiction has become an overwhelming epidemic in our society as accessibility and acceptability have increased drug usage across the country. Today, in the United States alone, more than 23.5 million people are afflicted with this disease that changes the brain of the user over time. Often times surrounding it is the stigma or idea that addicts are somehow less capable, weak minded or criminalistic. The doctors and researchers who focus on this subject have found that that is just completely not true.

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Sadly, statistics show that one in every six boys and one in every four girls will be sexually abused by their 18th birthday. The non-profit organization RAINN (Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network) reports that every 8 minutes government officials respond to a report of child sexual abuse. Additionally, the National Institute of Health (NIH) states that one third of children with a report of child abuse or neglect will have a substance abuse problem by their 18th birthday. Furthermore, according to the American Psychological Association (APA), nearly 55 to 60 percent of people who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) also have a substance abuse disorder of some kind.

What is Trauma?

The term trauma can be defined as an adverse and often malignant reaction to a singular or repetitive event that caused severe physical or psychological harm. It is characterized by a patient's inability to move past and process the experience without reliving it over and over again. Any type of dramatic event early on in life can be traumatic, such as;

Trauma of any kind can eventually lead someone to an addiction, especially those who develop a mental health disorder because of the traumatic event(s). Many trauma survivors will turn to drugs and alcohol to help cope with their feelings and any sort of mental health problems they may have because of their past traumatic experiences.

Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Trauma

While living with trauma can be different for everyone, there are some clear signs you can look out for if you think you or someone you know may be suffering from their traumatic experiences.

Keep in mind, this is not a complete list of signs or symptoms. If you believe you or someone else you know may be suffering trauma, do not hesitate to ask for help from a professional today!

How Childhood Trauma Impacts the Brain

Childhood trauma has become increasingly associated with addiction later on in life and can have a severe impact on brain development. According to statistical data, 37 percent of women currently in prison report abuse as a child while 14 percent of all men currently in prison report childhood abuse, but it is commonly supported that men are less likely to admit to others when they have been abused. Furthermore, research suggests that more than two-thirds of people in treatment for drug abuse report being abused or neglected as a child. It is important to understand the effects of trauma on the brain during early development in order to understand the powerful connection between addiction and childhood trauma.

The brains of children are literally shaped by traumatic experiences, which can lead to not only problems with addiction but with anger and criminal activity, along with many others as well. Early in life, the human brain is a social organ, hence the term “monkey see, monkey do”. It is shaped by experience, and if one grows up in a state of terror, the brain is wired to be on alert for danger and to make those feelings go away. The negative experience(s) teaches their brain to operate out of a state of fear and anxiety.

Additionally, scientists have discovered that there are also physical changes that can occur with childhood trauma. Brain imaging has shown that the part of the brain that is responsible for processing and emotional regulation changes in size with childhood trauma victims. This can also have an effect on memory and learning. The brain’s inner connections, the brain shape, and its size can all be influenced by the long term stress or abuse of a child.

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Reasons Why Trauma Victims Use Drugs

Aside from the change in the development of the brain, there are several reasons why trauma victims may decide to being using drugs or alcohol, research has shown that these are a few of the most common reasons;

Early childhood trauma is not something that should be taken lightly and we sincerely apologize for any trauma that you or your loved one may be suffering from. If you are experiencing any symptoms of trauma, or are struggling with an addiction, then have we experienced professionals who are trained specifically to understand and help treat victims of trauma or those struggling with an addiction. Call us today, we care about your recovery!

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Crystal Meth is Making a Worrisome Comeback in Texas

While the news headlines are dominated by the opioid epidemic ravaging the United States, crystal meth is making a relatively silent, but deadly return. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the rate of overdose deaths for methamphetamine more than tripled from 2011 to 2016 and that number keeps growing to this day. This is partly due to the increase of cheap, highly potent methamphetamine coming over the US/Mexico border. With the national attention and focus on opioids by public health officials, politicians and government agencies, meth has quietly made a comeback in the US. This likely will not change course, without the proper resources and greater public awareness of the nation’s problems associated with crystal meth.

When drug overdoses began to take more American lives each year than gun violence or car accidents, the attention (and funding) from federal, state and local governments was largely focused on prescription and illicit opioids. The good news is that these efforts may actually be working.

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New provisional CDC data shows that drug overdose deaths fell significantly in 2018. This is the first decrease in decades. From the data, it appears that government efforts to prevent doctors from over-prescribing, while making it easier for first-responders to carry naloxone (a life-saving opioid-antagonist) undoubtedly have helped make a real difference in the fight to curb drug overdose deaths.

With prescription painkiller abuse on the decline, drug overdose deaths from crystal meth and fentanyl are the new problem in the United States.

Unlike illicit and prescription opiates, methamphetamine addiction does not have any FDA-approved medications to assist in treatment and rehabilitation efforts. Drugs like buprenorphine, or Suboxone are available to help ease the symptoms of opioid withdrawal. These evidence-based, medication-assisted treatments (MAT) can also help reduce the likelihood for relapse later in recovery. By blocking opioid receptors in the brain, MATs are valuable tools for addiction treatment programs. These medications have shown a verifiable success rate in patients who are struggling with an addiction to opiates.

Meth on the other hand, can cause equally painful and severe withdrawal symptoms. Currently there are no medications available to ease the withdrawal symptoms associated with a physical or psychological chemical dependency to methamphetamine. Detox and treatment for an addiction to methamphetamine can therefore be quite difficult for most patients.

Another problem with the relative lack of effective treatment options for people who become addicted to meth, the ease of access to meth is currently at an all time high. In the 1990’s and early 2000’s we witnessed a major crackdown on illegal meth labs operating within the United States. Meth labs were quite prevalent in Texas, especially in the Houston and San Antonio areas. These ranged from very small operations in an RV in the desert or in someone’s garage, to giant meth super labs in warehouses. Once the Federal Government began imposing stricter regulations on the sale and availability of pseudoephedrine (Sudafed), meth manufacturing labs pretty much became extinct in the US.

These days, the major Mexican drug cartels supply most of the crystal meth that is found in American cities and rural areas. This meth is much cheaper and more potent than ever before. The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) reports that the current price of meth is the lowest they’ve seen in years. The Mexican drug cartels, with new manufacturing techniques are also producing meth that’s more than 90 percent pure. This highly-potent crystal meth is creating an entirely new generation of addicts across the nation, at a level of epidemic proportions.

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For comparison, in 2017, 813 people died from an overdose on crystal meth, while 591 died from a heroin overdose in Texas.

One of the major complications with a substance use disorder is that the patient can be using multiple substances at any given time. Emergency responders have a difficult time with drug overdoses, because while the patient may be unconscious they have no idea how to treat the overdose. Many people who use crystal meth, are also using other substances as well. Some end up using methamphetamine in the morning and opioids at night, while trying to balance a ‘normal’ lifestyle through the use of various different drugs.

Many of the fatal overdose deaths involving methamphetamine can also be partially blamed on opioids. The extremely dangerous synthetic opiate, fentanyl has been frequently found in different batches of methamphetamine all over the country. This contamination may be intentional, or it may be the result of drug labs that produce and package different substances, where cross-contamination of different drugs may be entirely by accident.

What are the different drug rehab options for someone who is addicted to crystal meth?

The addiction treatment specialists at More Than Rehab have helped people all types of people, many of whom are struggling with an addiction to multiple substances. Our comprehensive drug rehabilitation program can help people with any type of addiction, while we can even address the underlying causes of substance abuse. We see the addiction is often just a symptom of another deeply-rooted mental health issue. This is called a dual-diagnosis and our staff is well-equipped to help people who exhibit both a substance use disorder, along with an underlying mental health issue.

Our approach to meth addiction treatment focuses on making the whole person healthy, mentally, physically and spiritually. Often an addiction is merely a symptom of unresolved trauma that has led the patient to self-medicate, while they attempt to drown-out their sorrows. Since no medication assisted treatment exists specifically to treat a meth addiction, our facility uses a robust combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), group therapy, contingency management and relapse prevention. A variety of other treatment techniques could be used in conjunction with these, depending on the patient’s own unique, individual needs.

If you, a family member, friend or loved one are struggling with any type of drug addiction, please give us a call as soon as possible. The longer you wait to get substance abuse treatment, the harder it can be to quit. Most people who die as a result of complications from meth abuse are from a brain hemorrhage, seizure, or a heart attack. This is especially true for older addicts, as their bodies are no longer equipped to handle a long-term episode of substance abuse.

It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been using, or how much you have used in the past. More Than Rehab can help addiction at any level of severity. If this has been a wake-up call for either yourself, or your family, or friends, please talk to someone about the problem as soon as possible. Addiction won’t go away by itself. When you’re ready to change your life for the better, give us a call. We are available 24/7 to help you when you need it.

888-249-2191

Can You Afford Drug Rehabilitation?

If there were two primary obstacles to attending addiction treatment, they would most likely be a fear of asking for help and the doubt that they could even afford drug rehabilitation. Addiction treatment can be prohibitively expensive for many people who struggle with addiction, so how can you find out if you’re eligible to receive help when you’re ready for it? Millions of Americans still cannot afford health insurance, even with the passage of the Affordable Care Act, or “Obamacare”. While the well-intentioned government mandate that all health insurance plans available on the open exchange must cover mental health (including addiction treatment), there are still a lot of people who can’t afford health insurance to begin with.

Most people who have a substance use disorder may not even realize that addiction treatment might be covered by a health insurance plan they currently hold. This leaves the average person truly unaware of the costs associated with addiction treatment and drug rehab in Texas, and across the nation. Addiction treatment costs widely vary too, depending on the type of substance you’re addicted to, the level of addiction and the types of treatment you need to receive.

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Scientific, evidence-based approaches to drug rehabilitation are likely the most cost-effective versions of care, as they offer a proven success rate, regardless of age, gender and other demographics. These methods of rehabilitation can literally be life-saving so it is difficult to put an accurate price tag on rehabilitation. A lot of this comes from the perspective of the money you’ll be saving, taken for granted that the rehab works.

Addiction to drugs can be very expensive, let alone costing you your life...  

Say you have a major cocaine addiction, the typical addict can spend anywhere from $200-$1,000 a day on the drug during a heavy binge. This equates anywhere from $6,000, up to $30,000 a month for the simple maintenance of your coke habit. If rehabilitation works, just think of the money you could actually save in the long run. This is just one extreme example, but the bottom line is your livelihood and the chance to spend the rest of your life doing things with your family and close friends, versus chasing a high from a drug that will ultimately only ruin your life.

The different types of drug rehab and their associated average cost in Texas.

There are many different types of drug rehabilitation and different levels of care with each option and for each individual’s unique needs. Let’s break down the options below.

Detox: a full-medical detox is commonly the first step of a longer, more in-depth alcohol or drug rehabilitation. Some patients will only receive the detox part of rehab, because they think that’s all they’ll need. Detox will help you get off of the drugs or alcohol in a safe, medically monitored way. Some addictions have severe withdrawal symptoms that in some cases can be deadly. In the case of opiates, alcohol and benzodiazepines, quitting cold-turkey can have deadly consequences. Seizures, heart palpitations and delirium tremens could all possibly result in death. Again, the cost will vary depending on the severity of the chemical dependency and the type of substance you are detoxing from. Typically a medical detox at an outpatient clinic will run anywhere from $1,000 to $2,000 dollars.

Inpatient drug rehab: Most inpatient drug rehabilitation centers will require a minimum 30 day stay. Some require longer stays with a 90 day program. Depending on the area, and types of services provided the typical cost of inpatient drug rehab will range anywhere from $6,000 to $20,000 or more per month. Some rehab centers are quite luxurious, offering amenities that go far beyond what is required to quit using drugs or alcohol. These “destination rehabs” can go well beyond $20,000 per month and are typically reserved for movie stars and highly-paid CEO’s.

Outpatient addiction treatment: An outpatient treatment program can be much less expensive than a stay at an inpatient facility. Outpatient drug rehab programs usually comprise of support groups and individual therapy sessions, completed daily and you can typically attend these programs around your busy school or work schedules. Outpatient programs can be good enough for a mild addiction, but it could end up taking much longer than a stay at an inpatient facility. Outpatient drug rehab programs typically run around $5,000 for a three-month program.

A note about medication-assisted treatment (MAT) and evidence-based drug rehab.

An evidence-based approach to addiction treatment typically offers the highest success rates of any type of drug rehabilitation. For a patient who is addicted to alcohol or opiates like painkillers or heroin, medication may be beneficial to help you quit using. These medications, like buprenorphine, Suboxone or methadone are beneficial to help ease the painful, early withdrawal symptoms.

Evidence based methods of treatment show greater success rates when combined with individual and group therapy sessions, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, 12 step program integration and other supporting treatment options. Some medications will be taken for up to 12 months and the yearly cost of these medications will be around $5,000 per year.

How do I pay for addiction treatment? How Can We Afford Drug Rehabilitation? 

Most people will pay for a drug rehabilitation program with their insurance coverage. Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), otherwise known as “Obamacare” health insurance plans on the exchange will pay anywhere from 60-90% of the cost of drug rehabilitation program. This has been an important step to fighting the nations current drug overdose and opioid epidemic. Now more people have access to life-saving drug rehab services than ever before. If you are struggling with addiction and need treatment, you should consider looking into your health insurance coverage options.

If you cannot afford drug rehabilitation, some people will take out personal loans to pay for their addiction treatment. Attaining sobriety and giving yourself the amount of care you deserve is worth the money. You can think of rehab as an investment into making a better life for yourself, your family and your friends. Think of the alternative without attending rehab, typically you can either A) end up in jail, or B) continue your substance abuse and possibly die from a drug overdose. Sobriety is worth it and while it may seem difficult, sobriety is very much an attainable goal.

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With so many different options for you to get help, it is possible for almost everyone to get the addiction treatment they need. If for some reason, none of these options are a possibility for you or your loved one, there are many state-funded programs available to you. The Texas Department of Health and Human Services has a searchable database of low-cost rehab programs on their website: https://dshs.texas.gov/sa-search/. But do keep in mind that many of these government run programs will have long waiting lists, with robust eligibility requirements.

If you need help right away please don’t hesitate to give us a call at More Than Rehab. We strive to offer the best quality addiction treatment programs in the Houston, Texas area, at a low cost to our clients. We never want cost to prohibit you from getting the help you need. In many cases, we can find a way to offer care at little to no cost for you out of pocket. Please call us anytime, we are available 24/7 to take your call:

888-249-2191

Mental Health and Addiction Treatment

Dual diagnosis is the treatment of addiction with another co-occurring disorder.

In the field of addiction treatment, when someone has a substance use disorder, coupled with another form of mental health issue, we call this a co-occurring disorder or a dual diagnosis. Sometimes addiction treatment alone is not enough. We have helped many people in the Houston, Texas area by identifying a co-occurring mental health issue that was adding to their substance abuse problem. In a dual diagnosis treatment program, your treatment plan is customized to meet your specific individual needs. A personalized addiction treatment plan is the best chance for a successful recovery in these cases.

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For someone who has silently struggled with a mental health issue for years, often the only solace they find is to self-medicate with alcohol and drugs. Many patients say this helps quiet the voice in their head telling them that everything is wrong. People with depression may experience a boost of confidence when they use, even if it is only temporary. For someone dealing with and trying to hide their own troublesome internal thoughts, an addiction can develop quickly. If they receive treatment for their substance use disorder, but not for their mental health issue, they will be more likely to drop out of treatment, or even relapse into abusing drugs and alcohol.

Since mental health issues can lead to someone abusing substances, it is often hard to tell which one caused the other. Withdrawal symptoms can sometimes look like a mental or behavioral disorder to the untrained eye. Feelings of lethargy, depression, hopelessness and sudden weight gain are common signs of clinical depression. These same mental and physical symptoms can come from the early acute withdrawal symptoms from alcoholism. In most cases, it is not entirely clear if the mental health of the patient led them to abuse drugs and alcohol or if the abuse of substances created the mental problems they are experiencing.

Detox from drugs or alcohol is the first step in diagnosing an underlying mental health issue.

Cognitive impairment from long term drug and alcohol abuse can often interfere with the proper diagnosis of a mental illness. Once a patient undergoes a full medical detox, cleansing the chemicals from the body and mind, clinicians can start to assess the patient’s underlying mental health. This is a crucial part of addiction recovery, as many patients might not even realize they have been living with a mental health disorder. Some people have been using drugs or alcohol on a daily basis, filling up most of their daily life with intoxication. This can go on for years and years, without them ever realizing they have an underlying struggle with mental health.

When a patient finally experiences sobriety for the first time in a long while, the emotional stress can be very difficult to overcome. Stress, anxiety, sadness and guilt are all commonly experienced when someone first enters addiction recovery services. This is why it is important for someone who struggles with drugs or alcohol to seek rehab from a professional treatment facility. These facilities should offer detox and recovery services for addiction treatment while a dual diagnosis drug rehab will offer help with emotional recovery, medication management, stress reduction and other crucial mental health services. With the support of the right program it is entirely possible to transform your life and rebuild yourself from the ground up.

How mental health and substance abuse can develop together.

The US Department of Health and Human Services notes that, mental health and substance use disorders may share similar, underlying causes for their development. These include changes in brain chemistry, genetic vulnerabilities and childhood exposure to extreme stress or trauma. These problems are further compounded when the person begins using drugs or alcohol to hide their symptoms. Studies have shown that people who struggle with anxiety or mood disorders are almost twice as likely to struggle with addiction than the average person is.

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The four most common mental health issues where substance abuse is more prevalent are:

These types of disorders, when complicated with drug or alcohol abuse are often very difficult to treat. They may require months or even years for someone to fully recover towards a high-functioning state of well-being.  

How is a dual diagnosis treated?

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Treatment for co-occurring disorders at a drug rehabilitation facility will commonly include a variety of physical, mental and behavioral therapies. These are designed to work together on an individual basis, to help the patient with their mental health and to overcome their addiction. These will typically be conducted through a combination of individual and group therapy sessions.

Your treatment providers will work with you during your stay at rehab to formulate an aftercare plan that will help you stay focused on your recovery after you leave their direct care. Outpatient programs, 12-step support groups and relapse prevention strategies will help you during the crucial, early phase of your recovery.

If you or someone you love is struggling with addiction, consider seeking treatment right away. The pain experienced through a mental illness can have devastating consequences when left untreated. We employ a social model of addiction recovery in the Houston, Texas area. More Than Rehab is available 24/7, so we can get you the help you need, right away. Please call us:

888-249-2191

What is the Best Drug Rehabilitation?

Finding the best addiction treatment program for yourself or a loved one can be a confusing process for many. With so many treatment options available, it is difficult for some to find the best drug rehabilitation program that will suit their individual needs. Finding the best drug rehabilitation for your addiction can be one of the most important health care decisions you make in your entire life. Addiction to drugs or alcohol can quickly become a deadly disease. You have a lot of options available to help you, but we want you to make an informed decision on which program will offer the best care for yourself or a loved one.  

What are the different drug rehabilitation treatment types available to cure addiction?

Drug and alcohol medical detox

For most people, a full medical detox will be the first step of their alcohol or drug rehabilitation program. Before your treatment begins, you want to make sure your body and mind are prepared for the often intense withdrawal symptoms you may experience when you first stop using drugs or alcohol. This is why rehab programs will require you to complete a full detox before you begin your stay at a residential drug rehab facility.

Going through a full detox will rid your body of harmful toxins that were built up from past drug and alcohol abuse. The detox will help you get beyond the physical challenges of addiction, such as acute withdrawal symptoms, before you begin to address the mental and behavioral components of your addiction.

Physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms happen for most people when they first stop using drugs or alcohol. Many of these withdrawal symptoms can be eased with the help of Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT), beginning in the detox phase. These medications are designed to immediately make you feel more comfortable, while reducing your cravings for alcohol and drugs. MATs are considered to be science-driven, evidence based treatments, as they can also help prevent a relapse later on in your recovery from addiction.

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Inpatient alcohol and drug rehabilitation

Ongoing treatment is essential beyond an initial detox when a lifetime of sobriety is your ultimate goal. Entering an inpatient drug rehab facility will help you work through the psychological and emotional problems that contributed to your substance use disorder. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), individual and group counseling, 12 step programs, physical activities, family counseling and a variety of other techniques are employed to varying degrees in nearly every inpatient addiction treatment program. Some inpatient drug rehab programs last an average of 30 days, while others go up to 90 days or more, depending on the severity of the addiction. Some research has shown that the longer a person stays in a treatment program, the more positive the results will be:

"However, research has shown unequivocally that good outcomes are contingent on adequate treatment length. Generally, for residential or outpatient treatment, participation for less than 90 days is of limited effectiveness, and treatment lasting significantly longer is recommended for maintaining positive outcomes.

NIDA (National Institute on Drug Abuse)
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Inpatient drug rehab programs offer a comfortable group housing arrangement for others who are in similar stages of recovery. These settings are a good start for many people who just recently quit using drugs or alcohol. Inpatient rehab offers the patient a chance to get out of their daily routine, and really focus on the most important thing for their personal health: learning how to stay sober.

Inpatient rehab is absolutely essential when someone has an addiction to multiple substances or an underlying mental health issue that may have contributed to their substance use disorder. When someone has past trauma, it is likely this had heavily contributed to the reasons the addiction developed in the first place. Many have suffered from an undiagnosed mental illness that caused them to self-medicate in an attempt to feel “normal”. This is referred to as a dual diagnosis, and will require more intricate treatment techniques.  

Outpatient drug and alcohol rehabilitation

Outpatient rehab offers most of the same forms of treatment as an inpatient facility does, but it allows the flexibility for someone to get treatment for their addiction, while continuing to live at home, go to work or attend school while in rehab. This being the case, it is important to find an outpatient clinic near you.

Most outpatient clinics offer daily individual, group and family therapy sessions, coupled with various other forms of treatment. In many ways, outpatient care is no different from inpatient treatment, you just don’t live at the rehab facility. Typically, most would recommend an outpatient treatment facility to someone who has already completed 30 to 90 days of inpatient rehab.

Outpatient facilities offer patients the opportunity to extend the length of their treatment, while providing a continued foundation for their success in sobriety. Outpatient rehabilitation is also a great way to learn techniques to reduce cravings and prevent a relapse while having the chance to test them out in real world situations. Remember that sticking with a long-term strategy while in recovery is the key to achieving positive outcomes in your addiction treatment.

While the differences between inpatient and outpatient treatment are fairly straightforward, the differences in results will be determined by the individual needs of the patient. The goal of all of these programs is ultimately to help you build a new lifestyle that doesn’t include the use of alcohol or drugs.

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Finding the best drug rehabilitation in the Houston, Texas area

A long term substance abuse problem can have devastating consequences not only for yourself, but for your friends and family members as well. It is never too late to start an addiction recovery program but the sooner you act, the easier it will be. When an addiction goes untreated, the addict is prone to worsening health conditions and at a great risk for an accidental overdose death.

Every 11 minutes, someone dies from an opioid overdose in the United States. As the opioid epidemic rages on, the lives of many Americans are at stake. If you’re reading this, odds are this epidemic has hit close to home for you as well. Know that immediate help is available. At More Than Rehab, we are available to help you 24/7. All you have to do is pick up the phone and make that first call:

888-249-2191

When is the Time For Drug Rehab?

Maybe you’ve just come to realize that things have gotten bad, but are things really bad enough to check yourself into rehab? It is important to be aware that you are not alone. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) reports that an estimated 22.7 million Americans need treatment for a problem with drugs or alcohol. But how do you know when is the time for drug rehab for yourself, or even for a loved one? Having a substance abuse problem does not always mean the person is addicted to drugs.  Often times it will get to the point of addiction, before a person decides they want to stop.

It is important for you to know that a substance abuse disorder, or developing an addiction to drugs or alcohol does not mean that you are a bad person. Becoming dependent on alcohol or drugs is not a moral failing. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, (SAMHSA) “addiction is a health issue, not a moral issue”. Many people fear judgment they may receive because of the negative stigma that has been associated with drug and alcohol abuse. Please realize that there are millions of others just like you. You just need to know when it is the right time to ask someone for help. Addiction is a disease and much like any other disease, addiction is a treatable one.

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Addiction or dependence on substances can be both mental and physical:

You don’t have to develop a dependence, or be addicted to drugs or alcohol to attend rehab. If your substance abuse is causing any negative impacts on your life, it is never too early to ask someone for help. Sometimes it’s easier to see the changes in your life from the outside. Confiding in your close friends or family members is an important indicator to take into consideration when making the decision to attend a rehabilitation facility. If your family and friends are concerned about you, then you probably should be too.

A lot of people who struggle with an addiction to drugs or alcohol will try to quit on their own, without the help of a structured substance abuse treatment program. In most all cases, it is very difficult to break free from substance abuse on your own, especially once a physical or mental dependence on the drug has developed. Getting help from a structured drug rehabilitation program is the most likely way for someone to achieve sobriety.

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Denial can become a huge factor and coping mechanism for someone who is struggling with substance abuse. A lot of people who become addicted deny the facts surrounding them, in order to further justify using alcohol and drugs. You may have yourself convinced that you have things under control, or that you can stop at anytime. If your substance use becomes more important than other areas of your life, you likely have a problem. If you find yourself using more and more often or justifying the financial losses, turmoil in your personal relationships or if you’re facing legal troubles, it is likely a good time to consider checking yourself into a drug rehab facility.

Making the decision to seek professional help from a drug rehabilitation center:

It is usually not one earth-shattering, destructive event that may have pushed you to seek rehabilitation from drug or alcohol abuse. For most people who struggle with an addiction, it’s just the day-to-day routine of being constantly under the influence, struggling to find the money to get your next fix, all while trying to hide your problem from your friends and family.  Your routine of getting high becomes so exhausting that you finally begin to understand the fact that you need some professional help.

Many will feel trapped by their addiction.  They want to change, but don’t know how or they’re too afraid to ask for help. Perhaps they fear that they would become a burden to others, or they’re simply afraid to admit that things have gotten out of control. Most people do not want to admit their weaknesses to others. That is an essential part of our innate human nature. We constantly strive to appear strong, being able to take care of ourselves, even when, deep-down we know we can’t. It’s understandable and honestly, committing to go to a drug rehab is a huge decision that shouldn’t be taken lightly.

Many people who are struggling with addiction fear the painful withdrawal symptoms.

If you are experiencing withdrawal symptoms when you stop using, this is a sign you’ve developed a dependence to alcohol or drugs. Perhaps you experience nausea, headaches, insomnia, paranoia or a multitude of other ills when you stop using. This is how addiction holds on to you with a tremendous amount of power and control. A lot of addicts who want to stop using, simply don’t because the withdrawal symptoms can be too painful. These symptoms will only get worse with continued use.

A full medical detox is the first step of the most effective alcohol and drug rehabilitation programs. This can be intimidating and even scary for someone who is a struggling addict. A variety of evidence based, medication assisted treatments are available to help people who struggle with certain types of substance abuse. These medications can assist by easing the withdrawal symptoms during the early stages of a patient’s recovery. Some withdrawal symptoms can turn deadly, especially for people who become addicted to opiates like heroin, prescription drugs like Oxycontin or other opioids. A professional, medical environment is strongly recommended for the initial detox phase.

The best time for drug rehab is right now.

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Getting help with substance abuse is never easy for someone to admit, but the problems will only get worse over time. Addiction is a progressive disease, the longer you wait, the more difficult it will be to finally quit. Addiction can lead you to some dark places in life. Countless people do things they would have never even imagined before they started using. A continued addiction can also bear deadly consequences. In 2017, more than 72,000 people died from a drug overdose in the United States. Your family members and loved ones would be devastated if you left this planet because of your addiction. Get help today, pick up the phone and call our treatment center. We are available 24/7, and we want to help you right away.

888-249-2191