Before You Use Meth, Read This First

Meth is a very dangerous and highly addictive drug. It is used by a wide range of different types of people in the United States. However, it is typically more common among old teens or young adults, with the average age of a meth user being around 30 years old, much younger than cocaine and heroin users. This fact may be due to habitual users tending to overdose, or wind up in jail, well before becoming a middle aged adult. Although, there are still many people who are not in their 20’s or 30’s that still abuse meth as well. According to a recent survey conducted in 2017, nearly 1.6 million people reported having used meth at least once within the last year, with around 53% of them stating that they were addicted and roughly around 22% said that they had progressed far enough into their substance abuse disorder or addiction that they began injecting the drug into their veins.

What is methamphetamine, or crystal meth?

Meth, also known by many other names such as crystal meth, methamphetamines, and ice, is usually seen in the form of a clear crystal or a white rock looking substance. Meth is an illegal drug that acts as a central nervous system stimulant. What makes this drug extremely dangerous is that there is no medicinal value so it is only made in illicit, unregulated labs by untrained people who are also highly likely to be drug users themselves. Many harmful chemicals, such as battery acid, drain cleaner, antifreeze, or lantern fuel, are used in this illegal manufacturing process. Overdose with this drug is also extremely likely as the safety and strength of the product go unmonitored and untested for safe human consumption.

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The truth around meth that it is highly toxic becomes even more apparent when you begin looking at some of the physical and mental side effects that are commonly seen among steady meth users. One of these side effects is that meth can cause the person's body temperature to become so high that they either pass out or die, causing what is usually considered an unintended overdose.

Common short term side effects of meth abuse include:

These are just a few of the alarming short term side effects that are common among meth users. The highly toxic effects of meth do not take long to cause negative consequences to the brain and the body. With repeated use, these side effects only begin to worsen.

Meth abuse causes changes to the overall structure and function of the brain.

For instance, prolonged meth use causes damage to the dopamine circuit in the brain. Dopamine is the neurotransmitter most often related to pleasure and is responsible for those feel-good emotions associated with things like eating a piece of chocolate cake, or being intimate with a loved one. Dopamine is associated with reward driven behavior, it causes those feel-good sensations to increase the likelihood that a certain action will be completed again. Over time, with repeated release of the brain chemical known as dopamine, especially in unnatural situations, (such as meth abuse) the receptors become less sensitive. When receptors become less sensitive, this makes it much harder for a person to feel pleasure from natural situations.

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Not only can overuse of meth cause the dopamine receptors in the brain become less sensitive, it also decreases the natural supply of dopamine in the brain. Eventually, this may lead to a permanent dopamine deficiency and has been shown to have the same effects as a condition known as Parkinson’s disease.  Abusing methamphetamine can triple the chance of developing Parkinson’s for some people, it can even increase the chance of developing Parkinson’s up to 5 times for women. This condition affects the body's ability to control its muscle movements.

Unfortunately, these are not the only changes to the brain that occur from long-term meth abuse. Research has shown damage to the areas that affect both memory and emotion. It can also lead to changes in impulse control and the decision making process, diminishing the person's ability to stop certain behaviors. Some of these changes can even be permanent, usually depending on the severity of damage.

Some other physical side effects of meth use include:

There are many other long-term side effects someone may experience with prolonged substance abuse. However, not all of the side effects are related to someone's physical or mental health. An addiction to meth has also been known to cause damage to other areas of people's lives.

Meth abuse can destroy your life.

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Not only does meth destroy your appearance or your health, but it also destroys your life. When someone becomes addicted to meth, that is the only thing that starts to matter. Many people suffer job loss, homelessness, and problems with the law. Close relationships with family, friends, and children get ruined because of an addiction to meth. While meth abuse may destroy these aspects of your life, rehabilitation from a meth addiction is possible.

So, if you or a loved one are suffering from an addiction, please come get help from us today. You are not alone, many of us have been where you are before so we understand what it takes to get and stay on the road to recovery. We are here to help and we can show you the way! An addiction to meth is certainly not worth losing everything you have.

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What Drugs Cause Scabs or Lesions on the Skin?

Are you concerned that a loved one may be abusing drugs because you have seen what appear to be lesions or scabs on the skin? These types of skin sores just never really seem to go away, or sometimes they even seem to get worse. Unfortunately, with drug and alcohol abuse, scabs and lesions on the skin can be quite common.

Sometimes this is a telltale sign that they are in fact struggling with a substance abuse disorder, especially if it is combined with other out of the ordinary or uncharacteristic behaviors. Scabs or lesions on the skin related to drug use are often caused by a number of factors depending on the different drugs being abused. Several drugs can cause these skin lesions, sores, or scabs. Let’s look at the most common drugs that cause visible skin problems for the addict.

Methamphetamines

Meth, crystal meth, or methamphetamine is perhaps the most well-known drug on the list for causing some very serious issues with the skin. Also commonly referred to as meth sores, the open sores caused from regular meth use are often the result of a number of different psychological and physical side effects that come from regularly using this highly dangerous drug.

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Poor personal hygiene, sweating out toxins, a weakened immune system, and compulsive skin picking usually caused by “meth mites” (common hallucinations about insects or bugs that are either crawling on or in the skin) are all great examples of how using meth causes skin lesions or scabs. Using meth also constricts the blood vessels, which leads to the skin healing at a much slower pace. Meth sores can appear anywhere on the body, even inside of the mouth, a condition also known as meth mouth.

Cocaine

Cocaine is a highly addictive substance that has been known to cause lesions or scabs on the skin, typically depending on how the drug was ingested, like being snorted, injected, or smoked. Here are some of the most common skin related issues from regular cocaine or crack usage:

These are just a few of the most common skin reactions that can occur with cocaine use. Much like other drugs, cocaine is highly toxic and it is often cut, or combined with other dangerous and harmful chemicals.

Heroin

Other drugs that have been known to cause lesions, skin sores, or scabs are heroin, black tar heroin, or other types of opioid substances. All of these drugs are highly dangerous and addictive. Like many other dangerous and harmful substances, opiates cause health issues that are not just related to the skin. However, the most commonly seen effects of heroin on the skin are from users who inject the drug on a regular or somewhat regular basis.

The repeated penetration of the skin while seeking a vein can cause a condition known as venous sclerosis. Venous Sclerosis can lead to permanent scarring, something also known as “track marks”. It can also cause a range of other issues, such as skin infections, cellulitis (a potentially life threatening bacterial skin infection), and skin abscesses. Skin abscesses are commonly seen on people who inject heroin regularly, and, like cellulitis, it can become very serious if left untreated.

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Another cause for concern among heroin users is the process often referred to on the streets as “skin popping”. This is where the drug is directly injected under the skin, or subcutaneously, and sometimes even intramuscularly, instead of into the vein itself. Necrotizing skin lesions commonly occur with this popular practice as finding a vein becomes more difficult. Unfortunately, heroin users are also prone to obsessively picking at their skin, causing the chance of infection to become even greater. As with many others who suffer from addiction, heroin users often stop caring about their personal hygiene. All of these factors combined make the chance of having skin lesions and scabs much higher when using this drug.

Prescription Drugs

Additionally, some prescription medicines, especially when abused, are known to cause skin lesions or rashes. For example, prescription stimulants, like those commonly prescribed for ADD/ADHD, can cause hives, rashes, and hypersensitivity. In most cases, these reactions are considered to be allergic, so not everyone will experience these types of side effects. Other symptoms often associated with an allergic reaction to prescription stimulants are fluid filled pustules that can rupture and scab over, burning, blistering, and peeling. If you have recently taken any prescription stimulants and are experiencing any of these symptoms, please reach out to a medical health professional and get help as soon as possible before the condition worsens.

While these drugs can cause scabs or lesions on the skin, there are plenty of other health risks associated with addiction.

All of these symptoms are potentially very dangerous, so it is always suggested you seek medical care in order to get the help you need. No drug is worth the permanent damage that may be caused to your body or mind from prolonged and consistent drug use. Drug abuse is the cause of a number of other, very serious health risks.

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If you are wanting to get sober but are worried about the detox, then we are here to help. Here At More Than Rehab, we know just how difficult that getting sober can be, as many of us have been there before, and all we want to do is help to make that process easier.

We believe that everybody deserves the chance to have a healthy, sober, and fulfilling life, so we have many different types of treatment programs that are designed to fit your needs. We truly care about the health and well-being of both you and your family. Call us any time of day, 24/7, 365 days of the year and we will be here to answer your call. We would like nothing more than to give you the tools for recovery and put you on the right path!

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Hygiene and Drug Use: Why Does Use Cause a Lack of Care?

For many of us, maintaining our image is a matter of importance, at least to some degree. The power of first impressions have a huge impact in our modern world. Because of this, cleanliness and personal hygiene are often taught to us early on as children. The majority of people shower on a regular basis, brush their teeth every day, wear clean clothes, and keep a tidy house. Although it is true that hygiene habits may look somewhat different, especially depending on the person, in large part, many of us take some sort of pride in our appearance. Unfortunately, substance abuse has been known to change personal hygiene habits for people who have become addicted to drugs or alcohol.

A lack of care for personal hygiene and outward appearance can be a sign of drug use.

One of the most common physical signs or symptoms that someone may be struggling from a substance abuse problem is the deterioration in one's appearance. If you have ever struggled with an addiction, or have known someone that has, you may be aware that addiction is often defined as an inability to stop using drugs or alcohol, even despite harmful consequences, and that it is caused by chemical changes to the brain. If you know someone who has recently stopped caring about their appearance, along with other concerning behavioral or physical symptoms, it may be time to reach out for help. We have many experienced professionals ready to answer any questions you might have if you suspect a loved one of needing help.

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Call us today for help with your drug or alcohol addiction. We offer the best evidence-based treatment program in the Houston, Texas area.

Why does an addiction to drugs or alcohol have such an impact on personal hygiene?

Some may wonder why many addicts seem to be affected in such a way that they stop caring about their appearance and personal hygiene? If you stopped and asked an addict on the street, I’m sure that many of their answers would be the same. Many just stop caring, their addiction takes first priority, and is often their only priority. They spend most of their time too high to take care of themselves and the rest of the time they spend trying to get more drugs and resupplying their stash.

For others, they barely even notice that they haven’t showered or brushed their teeth for days, or that the clothes they are wearing smell of vomit, or they simply haven't changed their clothes in who knows how long. Some might even tell you that they are afraid that getting in the shower will ruin their high, so they avoid doing it for days on end.

One thing is for certain though, considering all the different reasons why many addicts either chose to neglect, or give up on, their personal appearance, it is no surprise that this can have significant consequences to an addict. Combine this with poor nutrition and an improper diet, along with the toxic chemicals often found in drugs, you have a deadly recipe for a lack of hygiene and poor outward appearance. The disease of addiction is very destructive and this has been shown time and time again.

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Drug or alcohol addiction can cause significant changes to things like your skin, your teeth, your weight, the way you smell, and even your hair.

Perhaps one of the first noticeable changes that occur when an addict stops caring about their appearance is what happens to the skin. Neglect, poor hygiene, poor nutrition, and dehydration are all associated with substance abuse and can have negative impacts on the skin. Common symptoms of substance-related skin issues include:

These common effects to the skin are why many addicts, or those in early recovery from addiction can appear to be much older than they actually are.

The negative effects of addiction on oral hygiene.

Another common consequence of poor hygiene, toxic chemicals from drug use, and poor nutrition is the tooth loss that many addicts experience. Although how heavily impacted your smile may be can differ greatly, depending on the drug of choice, all of these substances have a chance to steal it. For example:

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Substance abuse can also greatly affect your hair.

Improper hygiene and poor nutrition can lead to a lack of shine, brittle hair, and inadequate new hair growth. Certain drugs can also cause temporary hair loss. Throwing in a poor diet and bad hygiene practices only accelerates this process. For others, the lack of care for their hair appears as developing huge, dreadlocked knots, as they forget to, or are unwilling to brush it. Some recovering addicts report going so far as to shave their own head instead of dealing with chunks of hair falling out or having to brush it.

Sudden or extreme weight-loss can be a sign of a substance use disorder.

Along with changes to your hair, skin, and teeth is extreme weight loss. When your only concern is how you are going to get your next high, eating becomes way less important. Many addicts will also forgo buying food even if they are hungry in order to get more drugs. Certain drugs also reduce or eliminate hunger, acting as an appetite suppressant. Oftentimes, cocaine or methamphetamine users will go days, or sometimes even weeks without eating food.

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It can be very sad when we see a loved one who is putting off their appearance, or is not taking care of themselves, because of drug abuse or drug addiction. If you, or a loved one, need help getting back on the road to a healthy, sober life, then we are here to help! We can answer any questions you may have about the recovery process and would love to teach you the tools to get back on the road to loving yourself again!

If you, or a loved one is experiencing an addiction to drugs or alcohol and you need help, call us today! We are open 24/7.

888-249-2191

How Much Does Crystal Meth Cost in Texas?

When looking at the average price of crystal meth, the street value can vary from city to city, state to state, region to region. Due to our close proximity to the source of 90 percent of the meth available in the United States, the price of meth is typically lower in Texas, than in many other parts of the country. Most of the methamphetamine available in the United States comes across the southern border with Mexico. Due to government crackdowns in the early and mid 2000’s, much of the domestic manufacturing of meth dried-up. This brought a booming business opportunity to Mexican drug cartels and now they are flooding communities in Texas and the US with cheap, highly potent crystal meth.

But how much does meth cost? An addiction to crystal meth will cost as much as you are willing to give. Your home, your family, your job, your friends, your car, your health, even your life. Crystal meth addiction can be very expensive, not just for your pocket book, but a long-term addiction to meth can literally cost you your livelihood and your life.

According to the RAND Corporation, methamphetamine and amphetamine abuse costs the United States roughly $23.4 billion dollars per year. This data was compiled to develop consistent analysis of the many casual associations for the multitude of different harms associated with this deadly drug. Due to the nature of the data available (the most recent year being 2005) researchers created a range of estimates for the total societal cost of methamphetamine abuse in the United States:

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Taking all of these factors into account, crystal meth addiction costs much more than would be readily imaginable. Accidental drug overdose death, lost productivity in the workforce, meth addiction rehabilitation services, criminal justice system costs, child endangerment and production hazards from meth labs (chemical poisoning, explosions, property damage, etcetera) all create enormous costs associated with this devastating drug.

Crystal meth is not only highly addictive, it is also the leading cause of drug overdose death in Texas.

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An addiction to crystal meth can overtake your entire life. While rehab can be difficult, it is worth it.

Methamphetamine is a powerful stimulant that has been shown to release up to four times as much dopamine in the brain as cocaine. Because it is much cheaper than even crack cocaine, meth has become a very popular drug throughout many different segments of the population. It’s not just in the big cities, like Houston, Dallas or San Antonio. Meth is also a major problem for rural communities across Texas and the nation as a whole.

Due to the relative costs of meth, compared with other stimulants like cocaine, or even Adderall, meth is growing in popularity, regardless of the multiple dangers associated with its use. Even many street drug users have switched from crack cocaine to crystal meth, because it is much cheaper and the high typically lasts much longer. Even though the addict may think they are saving money by switching to methamphetamine, yet a typical meth addict can spend anywhere from $10,000, up to $40,000 per year on acquiring the drug according to conservative estimates. Some estimates state that a person who has developed a long-term addiction can spend up to $74,000 a year on their meth habit.

It’s not just financial costs that make methamphetamine a major problem for many Texas residents. Stimulants, like crystal meth kill more Texans every year than any other type of drug. Meth kills even more people than prescription and illicit opioids do. One of the major reasons for this is that there aren’t any life-saving medications for a meth overdose, like there are for other drugs. For instance, in the case of an opioid overdose, first responders and emergency personnel have the drug Narcan (naloxone) at their disposal. This is an opioid antagonist, that can block the brain’s opioid receptors and essentially reverse the affects of an opioid overdose.

For stimulants like methamphetamine, there is no overdose-reversing drug available. First responders often have trouble with meth overdoses, because many times the subject may be unconscious. This makes it hard for the emergency technicians to determine what is happening to the person. Often with a meth overdose, the person had been using multiple substances so it makes it difficult to determine the best approach to emergency medical care. All of these factors contribute to the increase of meth-related overdose deaths in Texas.

Treatment for meth addiction is available. Recovery is possible.

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Treating an addiction to methamphetamine is never an easy task. While a lot of focus has been on the opioid epidemic, meth use is silently roaring back into popularity all across American communities. Where federal funding has been pouring out into these communities to help fight the ongoing opioid crisis, little resources are made available to fight the scourge of methamphetamine abuse that is sweeping the nation.

This is unfortunate as the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) says that methamphetamine is currently the number one threat to Houston and the rest of the state. The number of overdose deaths, emergency room visits, treatment admissions and law enforcement seizures are all much higher than they are for heroin, which is the number two threat to Texas residents.

This crisis is compounded by the fact that there is no FDA-approved medication currently available to treat a methamphetamine addiction. Researchers at the University of Texas are currently working on a clinical trial for a two-medication treatment that is designed to block the euphoric affects of crystal meth and to reduce the painful symptoms associated with meth withdrawal.

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It's never easy to quit using drugs, especially crystal meth. Addiction Recovery is possible however, with the right help.

The withdrawal symptoms are a major reason many who struggle with an addiction to meth are afraid to seek treatment. The crash that comes with stopping the use of the drug can be seemingly unbearable. Lethargy, massive mood swings and depression are all very extreme in the case of a meth withdrawal. Sometimes the patient can become violently ill. The fear of the crash is why many people continue their use, even when they really, really want to quit.

If you or a loved one is experiencing an addiction to methamphetamine, you should know that the best time to quit is right now. The longer a meth addiction goes untreated, the more likely severe medical issues can take place. These dangers include accidental overdose death. 715 people in Texas died from an overdose on methamphetamine in 2017 and 320 sought emergency medical attention. There’s no reason this could be yourself or your loved one someday if the addiction continues.

Please give us a call today. At More Than Rehab, we offer a full-spectrum of services to not only help you overcome your addiction, but to help you rebuild your life. Our social model of addiction recovery was designed to help you prepare yourself to live a lifetime of sobriety, long after you leave our drug rehabilitation program. We know how much damage can be done with a long-term binge on crystal meth. Our experienced, compassionate staff is here to help you in every way possible, beginning with a full medical detox. Don’t wait another day, call us right away. We are available 24/7 to help you when you’re ready.

(888) 249-2191

Crystal Meth is Making a Worrisome Comeback in Texas

While the news headlines are dominated by the opioid epidemic ravaging the United States, crystal meth is making a relatively silent, but deadly return. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the rate of overdose deaths for methamphetamine more than tripled from 2011 to 2016 and that number keeps growing to this day. This is partly due to the increase of cheap, highly potent methamphetamine coming over the US/Mexico border. With the national attention and focus on opioids by public health officials, politicians and government agencies, meth has quietly made a comeback in the US. This likely will not change course, without the proper resources and greater public awareness of the nation’s problems associated with crystal meth.

When drug overdoses began to take more American lives each year than gun violence or car accidents, the attention (and funding) from federal, state and local governments was largely focused on prescription and illicit opioids. The good news is that these efforts may actually be working.

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New provisional CDC data shows that drug overdose deaths fell significantly in 2018. This is the first decrease in decades. From the data, it appears that government efforts to prevent doctors from over-prescribing, while making it easier for first-responders to carry naloxone (a life-saving opioid-antagonist) undoubtedly have helped make a real difference in the fight to curb drug overdose deaths.

With prescription painkiller abuse on the decline, drug overdose deaths from crystal meth and fentanyl are the new problem in the United States.

Unlike illicit and prescription opiates, methamphetamine addiction does not have any FDA-approved medications to assist in treatment and rehabilitation efforts. Drugs like buprenorphine, or Suboxone are available to help ease the symptoms of opioid withdrawal. These evidence-based, medication-assisted treatments (MAT) can also help reduce the likelihood for relapse later in recovery. By blocking opioid receptors in the brain, MATs are valuable tools for addiction treatment programs. These medications have shown a verifiable success rate in patients who are struggling with an addiction to opiates.

Meth on the other hand, can cause equally painful and severe withdrawal symptoms. Currently there are no medications available to ease the withdrawal symptoms associated with a physical or psychological chemical dependency to methamphetamine. Detox and treatment for an addiction to methamphetamine can therefore be quite difficult for most patients.

Another problem with the relative lack of effective treatment options for people who become addicted to meth, the ease of access to meth is currently at an all time high. In the 1990’s and early 2000’s we witnessed a major crackdown on illegal meth labs operating within the United States. Meth labs were quite prevalent in Texas, especially in the Houston and San Antonio areas. These ranged from very small operations in an RV in the desert or in someone’s garage, to giant meth super labs in warehouses. Once the Federal Government began imposing stricter regulations on the sale and availability of pseudoephedrine (Sudafed), meth manufacturing labs pretty much became extinct in the US.

These days, the major Mexican drug cartels supply most of the crystal meth that is found in American cities and rural areas. This meth is much cheaper and more potent than ever before. The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) reports that the current price of meth is the lowest they’ve seen in years. The Mexican drug cartels, with new manufacturing techniques are also producing meth that’s more than 90 percent pure. This highly-potent crystal meth is creating an entirely new generation of addicts across the nation, at a level of epidemic proportions.

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For comparison, in 2017, 813 people died from an overdose on crystal meth, while 591 died from a heroin overdose in Texas.

One of the major complications with a substance use disorder is that the patient can be using multiple substances at any given time. Emergency responders have a difficult time with drug overdoses, because while the patient may be unconscious they have no idea how to treat the overdose. Many people who use crystal meth, are also using other substances as well. Some end up using methamphetamine in the morning and opioids at night, while trying to balance a ‘normal’ lifestyle through the use of various different drugs.

Many of the fatal overdose deaths involving methamphetamine can also be partially blamed on opioids. The extremely dangerous synthetic opiate, fentanyl has been frequently found in different batches of methamphetamine all over the country. This contamination may be intentional, or it may be the result of drug labs that produce and package different substances, where cross-contamination of different drugs may be entirely by accident.

What are the different drug rehab options for someone who is addicted to crystal meth?

The addiction treatment specialists at More Than Rehab have helped people all types of people, many of whom are struggling with an addiction to multiple substances. Our comprehensive drug rehabilitation program can help people with any type of addiction, while we can even address the underlying causes of substance abuse. We see the addiction is often just a symptom of another deeply-rooted mental health issue. This is called a dual-diagnosis and our staff is well-equipped to help people who exhibit both a substance use disorder, along with an underlying mental health issue.

Our approach to meth addiction treatment focuses on making the whole person healthy, mentally, physically and spiritually. Often an addiction is merely a symptom of unresolved trauma that has led the patient to self-medicate, while they attempt to drown-out their sorrows. Since no medication assisted treatment exists specifically to treat a meth addiction, our facility uses a robust combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), group therapy, contingency management and relapse prevention. A variety of other treatment techniques could be used in conjunction with these, depending on the patient’s own unique, individual needs.

If you, a family member, friend or loved one are struggling with any type of drug addiction, please give us a call as soon as possible. The longer you wait to get substance abuse treatment, the harder it can be to quit. Most people who die as a result of complications from meth abuse are from a brain hemorrhage, seizure, or a heart attack. This is especially true for older addicts, as their bodies are no longer equipped to handle a long-term episode of substance abuse.

It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been using, or how much you have used in the past. More Than Rehab can help addiction at any level of severity. If this has been a wake-up call for either yourself, or your family, or friends, please talk to someone about the problem as soon as possible. Addiction won’t go away by itself. When you’re ready to change your life for the better, give us a call. We are available 24/7 to help you when you need it.

888-249-2191

Meth Abuse In Texas, What Can We Do?

Difficult but Possible: Meth Rehab In Texas

Although the national conversation of drug abuse and overdose deaths has been focused on the opioid crisis, methamphetamines are still the leading killer for Texans. 715 people overdosed on meth in Texas in 2016.  This is compared to the 539 who overdosed on heroin in Texas in 2016. Heroin and other opiates are still a major problem, but meth remains one of the most addictive and life-threatening drugs available on the streets today. Compound the problem with fentanyl being increasingly added to batches of meth and overdose deaths could skyrocket in the next few years.

Meth is a Hard Drug to Quit.

It is easy to become addicted even after just the first few times you use methamphetamine as your body can become very dependent on the high. It is incredibly potent and the high can last for over 10 hours, which is very attractive to people looking to get high. A lot of addicts begin using meth thinking they could control their usage. They may just want to be more alert or stay up all night to study for a final exam in college. Some users think they can use it for a little while to help them lose weight. But sadly, even people who think they can control their use get caught up in the highly addictive properties of the drug very fast.

How is Methamphetamine Addiction Treated? 

Meth addiction usually requires a longer and more intense outpatient treatment program than for other drug addictions. The initial stage of effective meth rehab treatment programs is the initial detox. Since meth is such a physically addictive drug, the initial detox can be quite difficult for the patient. The first 24 hours are extremely intense, and the early physical withdrawal symptoms can last for weeks, depending on the amount of time the person has been using meth. Underlying mental health issues can come out during this process and can make the path towards sobriety even more difficult to navigate.

As the initial detox and acute meth withdrawal is completed, the post acute withdrawal symptoms (PAWS) can last anywhere from a couple of weeks to a couple of years depending on the length of abuse.  This stage of recovery can include severe depression, anxiety, physical fatigue, paranoia, delusions, insomnia and an intense condition known as anhedonia where the patient has severely reduced motivation and the inability to experience pleasure. This occurs because a serious, long-term meth addiction can destroy the dopamine receptors in the brain.

The psychological affects of meth withdrawal can be almost too much to bear for many recovering addicts. During the long, difficult withdrawal process, relapse is quite common. Many who are in treatment cannot deal with the negative effects of the withdrawal symptoms and the urge to relapse during this stage is very strong. The best treatment regimen for meth abuse is this initial physical detox and a complimentary psychological therapy that helps identify potential relapse triggers and changes the mental perception of the meth user towards a sustained, lifelong sobriety. Setting up positive reinforcement and alternative coping mechanisms to help the patient build self-confidence to achieve goals and maintain their newfound sobriety.

What Should I do For Myself, or a Family Member Who Needs Help?

Meth addiction affects not only the user, but also their friends, family members and the community as a whole. Here in Texas, methamphetamine abuse has been a problem for decades and it is compounded by the socioeconomic factors unique to Texas life. Addiction knows no boundaries and many different types of people from all different backgrounds can easily become addicted.

Sometimes the Hardest Part of the Recovery Process is Taking the First Step and Asking for Help.

If you or a loved one in your family has a substance abuse problem, give us a call at More Than Rehab. We are open 24hours a day, 7 days a week to assist you and answer any questions you may have.

888-249-2191