Should I Be Afraid of Rehab?

Addiction affects almost every part of your life. Admitting that you have an addiction problem is the first step toward recovery. Denial is a large part of addiction, and breaking through self-deception is very difficult. So, if you’ve reached a point where you accept that drugs and alcohol are a serious problem in your life, then you’ve probably dealt with the hardest part. Rehabilitation is only a small part of it, yet many can be afraid of rehab. It's a huge life-changer and it can be difficult, but that shouldn't discourage you.

Addiction is a chronic disease that changes the way the brain functions. You may no longer have control of how you feel or act. But you should know that this isn’t about willpower or morals – it’s about acknowledging that you need help and accepting it.

It’s normal to have fears about rehab. Millions of others also fear joining rehabs for various reasons. So much so that only 10% of 20.4 million people with substance use disorders sought out addiction treatment in 2019. But fears only get in the way of sober living. Joining an addiction treatment center is going to be your best shot at addiction recovery.

But still, no one wants to join drug addiction treatment programs – at least not at first. Rehab is a scary thought for many families and people who struggle with addiction. The word itself comes with a huge stigma, and the idea of joining a facility for residential treatment can be equally overwhelming.

Also, joining rehab means letting go of substances, leaving the comforts of your home, and starting a new life. It means giving up control and embracing change. But as they say, change is as good as rest.

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Common fears about rehab

Fear of detox and withdrawal

The thought of detox or withdrawal symptoms can be intimidating, especially if you’ve experienced them before or have heard stories. While withdrawal isn’t going to be your cup of tea, there are many ways to make it comfortable and tolerable. Treatment programs offer full-time help and access to medications and therapies to ensure you are pain-free. You’ll also be monitored by trained medical staff throughout your entire detox process.

Fear of leaving behind your life

Walking away from your comfort zone – your family, home, job, friends, or even substances can be scary. After all, you are leaving behind your life as you’ve known it and heading towards the unknown. But while this thought can be overwhelming, treatment is way less damaging than staying and continuing with your using habits. If the people you’re scared to leave behind care about you, they will be happy to see you get help.

Just ensure that everything is in order so that your only concern is to sober up. Arrange care for your elderly parents, children, or pets. Apply for the 12 weeks of family and medical leave to protect your work and sign up for automatic bill payments. The goal is to leave bills, jobs, and drama outside so you can focus more on getting better.

Fear of missing out (FOMO)

FOMO is one of the most common fears many people who struggle with addiction deal with before going to rehab. The illusion that drugs and alcohol go hand in hand with fun can make you skeptical about getting help. You may feel as though you’ll miss out on weekends, or after work, and so on. There’s also the aspect of friends; how they’ll hang out without you and how boring your life will get without them.

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All these can be overwhelming, making you afraid of rehab and what happens afterwards. But substance abuse only leads to addiction, legal issues, financial troubles, broken relationships, etc. Unless you break free, you really won’t have a clear perspective of what fun means. Once you go through rehab, you’ll make new friends, learn new things, take up a hobby, travel, and even spend more time with loved ones. You’ll also identify fun activities that aren’t harmful to your health and relations.

Fear of not knowing how to cope with anxiety and stress

If you fall into the 50% category of those who experience substance use disorder due to mental health issues, you may fear that you won’t know how to cope once you stop using. But the good news is that treatment facilities often offer 12-step programs to help you resolve most of the underlying issues. They also offer holistic treatments to address mind, body, and soul. On top of that, they point you to support groups to serve as your sounding board, so there's no need to be afraid of rehab.  

Fear of dealing with past trauma, neglect, or abuse

Many aspects – including childhood neglect, abuse, and trauma – might have contributed to your substance use disorder. Perhaps you’ve been suppressing the difficult past, but now you’re dealing with the prospect of facing it as part of the healing process.

It is scary to face the ghost of the past, but you won’t do it alone. Treatment centers have counselors who will hold your hand throughout the process. You’ll also have access to group therapy and other treatment options to help you process thoughts, emotions, and beliefs linked to the past trauma. In the end, the past won’t have a grasp on you.

Fear of starting a new life

Without drugs or alcohol, you may have no idea what you are, and that’s a scary place to be. But this is only temporary. During treatment and early recovery, you’ll be able to step out of your comfort zone and try new stuff. You’ll also hang out with sober friends and family and create new experiences. This might be a great time to try out new hobbies and interests.

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Fear of failure

One of the main reasons most people are afraid of rehab is the fear of failure. The thought of going through a treatment plan but ending up with a relapse is devastating. But failing to try because you fear failing is denying yourself an opportunity to lead a clean life. In fact, you may be shocked by how well you respond to treatment.

And even if you relapse, it is still a step in the right direction. The National Institute on Drug Abuse shows that 40-60% of people with addiction relapse after treatment. Should you relapse, it’s vital to point out the triggers and find a way to avoid placing yourself in similar situations again.

Fear of success

Perhaps you’ve done things in the past that you aren’t proud of and feel like you have to punish yourself or be unhappy forever. Or maybe you suffered in the hands of someone who said you didn’t deserve happiness or that you wouldn’t amount to anything, and you believed them. So you’re always self-sabotaging to avoid success.

But everyone deserves a shot at happiness. Embrace your fears and not run away from them. Treatment centers have experts who will reinforce positive mental health and help you overcome any trauma that may have affected you. There is no need to be afraid of rehab. Depending on the rehab, the treatment plan may also include a faith-based approach to help you connect with your higher power to overcome addiction.

Fun Things to Keep Busy & Off Drugs for the Holidays

For a lot of people, winter marks a great time of the year. They look forward to fun things like spending time with family, eating great food and celebrating the holidays. What some people don't know though, is how difficult this time of year can be for a recovering alcoholic or drug addict. For someone who is in recovery from a substance abuse problem, the holiday season can be especially troubling. Most of the time before getting sober, holidays used to be about getting drunk or high and using their drug of choice. Holidays were often an excuse to abuse drugs or alcohol, even if that meant hiding it from their friends and family.

When someone is newly sober, or sometimes even long into recovery, celebrating holidays can often become a relapse trigger and make them want to abuse drugs or alcohol again. Not to mention the limited outdoor activity, reduced sunlight, and less social contact that often comes with winter and colder temperatures. This can dramatically increase the risk of relapse for many addicts, especially those who also struggle with their mental health. If you or a loved one struggle with maintaining sobriety during the holidays, then you can probably relate.

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Here are a few fun things you can try to help keep you busy & off drugs this holiday season:

  1. Exercise

Though initially exercise may not sound like fun for everyone, it never hurts to try. Many who exercise regularly report feeling happier and less stressed when compared to those who don’t. Try signing up for a free membership at your local gym or start small by doing workout videos at home and cranking up the music. You can even download a video game like Just Dance to help get your heart rate going. If you can make it a regular habit, exercise is proven to increase things like self-confidence and reduce stress.

  1. Volunteer

Another great way to help keep you busy during the holidays is to volunteer your time to a great cause! You can start by working at your local soup kitchen or reach out to a local organization whose efforts you would like to support such as the Humane society. Research has consistently proven that those who give back to others, often feel better than those who only take care of themselves. Simply giving even just one hour of your time each week can make a world of difference for more than just yourself.

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  1. Fix Up Your Space

Is there a new design idea you have always been wanting to try? Or perhaps a cool new chair for your man cave? Try sprucing up a room in your house, one bit a time and on a budget that you can afford. Paint the walls a new color. Do whatever creatively comes to mind. This is a great way to expel some of your pent up mental energy. You can also spend time cleaning out places like the garage or the attic. All of these are great examples of things that will keep you busy and help you feel better at the same time.

  1. Get A Plant

Getting a plant can actually be very rewarding. If you have ever had the chance to speak with a gardener, they will likely tell you how mentally and spiritually fulfilling it can be. The same thing goes with getting a house plant. Attending to the needs of something as simple as a plant can help you stay busy and feel better about yourself. It can also help give you something to look forward to, which helps you further avoid a relapse, as getting drunk or high would likely mean its end. Getting a plant is also a great way of fixing up your space on a tight budget. Try visiting your local plant store and speaking with someone to help figure out the right type of plant for you.

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  1. Go Ice Skating or Play Hockey

Even though you may not be able to go outside as easily as you can in the summer, there are still plenty of activities that you can do during the colder months. There are many places to go ice skating, usually both indoors and out. You can also try to find a local hockey league in your city if you want to get a little physical on the ice. Perhaps even try getting together a group of sober friends or people from your local AA or NA support groups so that you can all lace up together and hit the puck around the ice. This is a great way to combine physical activity with your social support network while doing some fun things.

  1. Take Naps

With reduced sunlight and the related chemical changes that can happen in the brain with shorter days, it may be no surprise that you are tired halfway through the day more often than you used to be. Don't be afraid to take a nap every once in a while, maybe even once every day. Taking a nap is a great way to pass the day and has many proven benefits, such as improved cognitive abilities and heightened mood. Just as long as you don't start sleeping too much, as that can have its own set of problems.

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  1. Do Puzzles

Puzzles are a great way to get the creative juices flowing in the brain and release some mental tension. They also take up quite a bit of time to finish, which is great for the wintertime and holidays. Plus, once they are done it's a very celebratory and rewarding moment. Go to your local supermarket and take a peek at their puzzle section, you are sure to find one that you would like to complete. The great thing about puzzles is that you can do them alone, or with loved ones or friends.

These are just a few ideas to get you started on how to have fun and avoid any potential drug cravings during the holidays. We wish you the best during this time of year but if you do find that you need some additional support with your sobriety, then we are always here to help. Reach out to us at More Than Rehab any time of day!

(888) 249-2191

How Can Drug Court Help Addicts Recover & Avoid Jail?

Recovery from a drug or alcohol addiction is never easy, but for some it can require more intervention. The level of care necessary really depends on the individual and is affected by things like how long the person has been abusing alcohol or drugs, how heavily they have been using these substances, and whether or not they use more than one drug at a time. For anyone who has been there, getting and staying sober can be extremely difficult. It can also be hard to see a loved one struggle with a substance abuse disorder, especially if they have acquired some legal trouble along the way. This is where the option of a drug court can come into play in the recovery of an addict.

Many addicts will find themselves behind bars at one point or another in their lives, which often leads them to being surrounded by people who are living the same type of lifestyle and gives them the opportunity to make even more connections that will continue to enable their criminal behavior. Usually, after enough criminal activity, or depending on the severity of the charge, probation or parole are often the first steps, but many will still end up reoffending and get yet another new drug-related charge or conviction. This problem has led many states to create new methods of reform, or treatment, when an offender has substance abuse issues and also has drug or alcohol related charges.

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Drug Court is a relatively new attempt at solving the war on drugs for many jurisdictions across the United States.

Drug court is often a specialized branch in the judicial system that handles, oversees, monitors, and resides over special cases related to non-violent drug offenders. Today, there are approximately 3,000 drug court systems throughout the United States, each of them with the goal to recover addicts and keep them out of jail. Serving time behind bars has long been known to not work in place of an individual’s drug rehabilitation. This is meant to provide an alternative to jail for people with substance abuse problems. As the American justice system is gaining a better understanding of how to properly manage these cases, drug courts are being seen as a better alternative than jail.

Addiction is served better with treatment, than jail time.

Most drug courts are run by public servants who operate under the knowledge that addiction is a public health problem and not inherently a criminal one. It is likely that many would not have committed these crimes unless they were suffering from the disease of addiction.

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For the family and friends of those who are addicted to drugs or alcohol, we may want to believe that jail will make them better. It logically seems as though they would flourish with the restrictive daily routine that jail imposes on them. Yet, drugs are readily available in jails and prisons across the United States. Since there are those who continue abusing substances while in jail, it is likely difficult for people to ever “get better” while behind bars. Either way, for the majority of addicts, a few weeks out of jail and they are back to their old ways.

Drug court systems have shown positive results on helping people recover from addiction to drugs and alcohol.

Drug court works by providing this intense supervision that many addicts need in order to effectively change their behavior, the people they hang out with, and the learned habits that come with being addicted to drugs or alcohol. This includes regular drug and alcohol testing, often multiple times per day while the person is new to the program.

Drug court participants have consistent reporting sent to case managers, they must participate in many different treatment programs and group counseling sessions, regular court dates to track progress and prompt intervention by drug court personnel, should there be a setback or relapse. The overall idea is to closely monitor participants and actively engage them in their own recovery in order to keep them focused and dedicated to actual change.

Drug courts can lower the recidivism rates of its participants.

While research and data varies some on this topic, many can agree that recidivism rates of people with substance abuse issues, who also completed a drug court program, are significantly lower than those who did participate in a drug court program. According to the National Institute of Justice, the felony re-arrest rate decreased from 40% all the way down to 12% after a two year follow up time period. Other reputable sources show that well-administered drug courts reduce criminal activity by up to 35%, a remarkable finding when compared to traditional case management or proceedings. Not to mention, the cost for treating these individuals is far lower than the cost of keeping them in jail, where they are also more likely to reoffend. This makes drug court a more effective method than the usual jail-time punishment, from the perspective of both the taxpayer and the person suffering from an addiction to drugs or alcohol.

There are many reasons why drug courts are more effective. Not only do they provide that crucial structure many addicts need while early in recovery, but they keep addicts out of jail and they also reunite them with their families. Drug courts provide services that allow addicted family members to kick their habit, stay out of jail, and shows them the tools necessary to live life while healthy and sober. Parents in these programs are twice as likely to attend and complete treatment, also decreasing the amount of time their children may have needed to spend out of the home, in places like foster care.

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Accountability is also very crucial to those in recovery, and drug courts supervision and comprehensive care prevents the vast majority of offenders from dropping out of the program early on. The connection they have with the judge they see usually on a weekly basis, the peers they spend time with in group counseling sessions, and other members of the drug court team all work together in keeping the person accountable for their recovery. Because of this participants in drug court are 6 times more likely to finish treatment.

If you are facing the decision of participating in drug court or staying in jail, the research doesn’t lie. By participating in drug court you are much more likely to succeed in sobriety, but you have to want to change. The same can be said for anyone who is looking to get help for the drug or alcohol addiction. If you are needing help and are unsure where to turn, please reach out and give us a call! Here at More Than Rehab, much like drug court systems, we know what it takes to make a lasting change to live a healthy life of sobriety.

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Can Remote Drug Rehab Work?

In the world today, it seems as though uncertainty and fear linger behind every corner, as the Coronavirus, also commonly known as Covid-19, has caused extreme panic and unrest across the globe. Since being brought to mainstream media attention somewhere back in the beginning of this year, the Coronavirus has forced nations to shut down, forcing businesses and government agencies to close their doors to the public in an attempt to flatten the curve. Due to the fact that the virus has a high-exposure rate and can live on surfaces for a long time, only essential businesses were allowed to remain open. This has caused many widespread consequences that are being felt across the world.

One of the biggest impacts that Covid-19 has caused in the United States alone is a high percentage of relapse rates among people in addiction recovery from drugs and/or alcohol. A higher rate of relapse could lead to an increase in drug overdose deaths. The increase in drug and alcohol use could be due to a number of reasons, such as: high unemployment rates, forced isolation due to city shut downs and self-quarantining, free federal aid, closure of outpatient drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs, no access to Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or Narcotics Anonymous (NA) meetings, etc. Unfortunately, due to the nature of coronavirus, people are being forced to self-isolate and are being cut off from the peer-support life line that helps to keep them sober.

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While drug and alcohol rehab facilities have been forced to make some difficult decisions, they have also come up with some revolutionary ways to remain a valuable source to those in recovery that need it. One way that rehab facilities have come up with in order to serve those still in need during this time of social distancing is by offering remote rehab. Remote rehab is typically an outpatient program designed to fit the individuals specific needs with the use of digital technologies, such as Zoom, Skype or Facetime. This is great for anyone who still needs rehab treatment during the time we are unable to leave our homes. Here are some additional benefits to remote drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs;

Increased Level of Privacy with Remote Outpatient Drug & Alcohol Rehab

In today's modern world, where Facebook and social media are key, it seems like nothing is ever kept a secret anymore. Well, remote drug rehab can help save you the trouble, or potential embarrassment, of someone seeing you while at a drug or alcohol treatment center or facility. Being able to attend a counseling session, with a licensed therapist one-on-one, on the internet through your computer, tablet, or phone provides an increased sense of privacy as you do not have to leave the comfort of your own home. Who knows, you never know who you will see and sometimes it’s better to avoid a situation where you have to explain yourself at all.

More Flexibility with Personalized Addiction Treatment

A lot of times, outpatient programs require their participants to attend class at a certain time of time, usually one to two times per week, and sometimes even more. This schedule can be hard to fit in with a busy everyday life. We have all probably been there before and have felt the stress that comes along with having to meet a very demanding schedule. An added benefit with remote alcohol or drug programs is the added flexibility. The majority of remote drug and alcohol programs allow you to select an available appointment that best fits your needs, instead of giving you a set time where you are supposed to be somewhere. This is also really great for those who have their kids at home because of public school closure due to the virus.

Added Comfortability with Stay-At-Home Addiction Counseling

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Along with more privacy and more flexibility, is the increased comfort that remote drug rehab can provide. Long gone are the days where we have to worry about what outfit to wear to our next class, appointment, or meeting. Instead, it has become easier than ever to do the things that we need all while never changing out of our favorite pair of sweatpants. Attending outpatient treatment remotely allows you to get the help that you need all in the comfort of your own home while also wearing your favorite pajama pants, or perhaps none at all. Of course, this is not to say that we do not have to have a professional appearance, but the standards are way lower when both parties are communicating from an online platform, instead of in-person, with a room full of peers.

Guaranteed One-on-One Time With an Addiction Specialist

The majority of outpatient alcohol or drug addiction programs require that you meet a couple times a week with a group of peers who are also on the road to recovery. While this is great, that can sometimes mean that you don't necessarily get the one-on-one feedback that you would like. The great thing with remote drug and alcohol rehab is that you are guaranteed to get more one-on-one time with your counselor or addiction treatment specialist. This can be especially useful during a time where daily life is changing drastically for everyone. A little extra time with someone who truly understands what you are going through can really make all the difference.

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These are just a few of the ways that remote drug and alcohol rehab can benefit you, even more so in a time where the only way to stay connected is online. It is important to remember that even though you may feel like it, you are not alone! While relapse can be a part of recovery, that doesn't mean that it has to be. At More Than Rehab, we are still here to help those who are struggling and we are all in this together! Most importantly, we hope that you and your family are staying safe and we wish you well. If you, or someone you know, has been struggling with sobriety because of COVID-19, or any other reason, please do not hesitate in asking for help! Just because it feels like the world outside has shut down, that does not mean that we are not here to help those who need it!

(888) 249-2191

6 Common Triggers for Drug Use and How to Avoid Them

Once you have embarked upon the journey of getting clean, remaining sober can often times prove difficult, especially for those who have recently found sobriety or overcome addiction. While relapse can sometimes be considered part of the recovery process, by allowing us the opportunity to learn about the potential causes that may lead to unwanted drug or alcohol abuse, we hope to avoid them altogether by becoming more aware of some of the most common triggers associated with drug use and techniques to better cope with them.

If you have ever experienced a relapse, or are new to recovery, know that you are not alone, research suggests that between 40 to 60 percent of people who have recently undergone treatment for a drug or alcohol addiction will relapse within just one year of sobriety. https://health.usnews.com/wellness/articles/2017-04-24/why-do-alcoholics-and-addicts-relapse-so-often One of the ways to keep from becoming a member of this statistic is to pay attention to cues or situations that can lead to this unwanted drug or alcohol use, below is a list of 6 common triggers and some additional tools so that we can hopefully avoid them:

  Negative Emotions

After having masked negative emotions with drugs or alcohol throughout the span of an active addiction, learning to cope with these emotions in a healthy way can be one of the most challenging fundamentals to sobriety. Beginning to sit with these feelings can cause uncomfortability and anxiety, especially when we have never confronted them before. Having a strong support system when we feel sad, confused or frustrated can help alleviate some of the stress that newly recovered addicts may experience. Joining a twelve step program and finding the right sponsor, seeing a new therapist or a counselor, and even going to a gym can be a great start in learning how to cope with these emotions in a healthier way. By allowing ourselves to feel these negative emotions and openly communicating them, our comfort level will begin to increase as we see that eventually these feelings do subside and that we had the strength to face them without the use of drugs.

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   Do you need to H.A.L.T.?

Emotions play a major role in recovery and getting to know your body is a key step towards remaining sober. Are you hungry, angry, lonely, or tired? Knowing when to listen to these feelings and having an action plan to resolve them will ensure that you are not reaching for drugs or alcohol and that you are giving your body what it needs instead. Try setting aside time for meal planning if you find that you get hungry around a specific time of day, practice good sleeping techniques before bed if you have trouble falling asleep or plan for an emergency cup of coffee if you begin to feel sluggish throughout the day. You can always attend a 12 step meeting or call a trusted friend, just by understanding these needs we can effectively avoid the trigger.

  Dating and Relationships

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Finding love is one of the most amazing things you can experience in life. Relationships can also cause a lot of stress which could trigger a relapse into drug or alcohol abuse.

Often suggested, but commonly ignored, is the advice to steer clear of any romantic involvement (no matter how casual) within the first year of recovery. There are many reasons why dating early in the recovery process should be avoided, addiction is a disease of emotion and new relationships come with many, they may begin to replace the substance and form an addiction of their own. Abstaining from any kind of sexual relationship when new to sobriety will assure that healthier coping mechanisms are being established instead of putting yourself at risk for relapse from the emotional stress of a new relationship. Also, by waiting till we are healthy enough as an individual to begin dating again will only increases the likelihood of finding a more suitable partner.

   Times of Celebration

Birthdays, holidays, and other times of celebration are usually associated with positive emotions but when new to recovery it can be a trigger for drug use. It may not be realistic to expect that you can simply just skip going to all of these events but knowing what to expect when you get there can decrease the chance of falling back into old habits, especially when considering going to a place where drugs or alcohol may be involved. Many recovering addicts feel that they are able to control themselves and their addiction by "just having one", we know that this is a common misconception. By preparing yourself before the party, you can limit your exposure to these triggers, ask others in attendance what kind of substances will be there and have a support system set in place by bringing along a sober family member or friend who can help remind you how important your recovery is and deter you from any potential relapse.

   Professional Success

Alternatively to negative emotions, positive experiences can also be a trigger for unwanted drug use. Have you just landed a new promotion at work or have you finally gotten that long sought after raise? Be careful not to fall back into the old mindset that you have somehow overcome your disease by attaining this accomplishment. A mistake often made by people in recovery is that they are now cured because an addict could have never cultivated this achievement. It is all too easy to want to go out and celebrate, just like old times, but we know by now that addiction doesn't just go away. Make sure that you keep your support system in place by sharing your thoughts and emotions with others in the event that you are headed for a relapse.

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    Overconfidence

While having confidence in yourself during recovery is a good thing, becoming too confident can be a potential trigger and lead to a relapse, as many forget the importance of their recovery plan. It is easy to feel as though you have conquered your addiction as the day to day struggles of sobriety seem to lessen but reminding yourself that you are still susceptible to triggers can go a long way in continued sobriety. Staying in contact with your sponsor or therapist, attending regular meetings, and staying humble about your addiction are essential to a life of sobriety. If you find yourself getting complacent or feeling as though you are now above your addiction, consider mentoring someone who is newer in their path to recovery and remind yourself that staying sober requires a conscious daily effort.

We know that sobriety is a lifelong journey and that it will require hard work on a daily basis in order to sustain, no matter where you are in the process. Staying vigilant to your recovery plan and maintaining a good support system lessen the chances of giving in to these triggers that may lead to an unwanted relapse. Take some time to think back upon instances where you felt triggered or had a craving to use drugs or alcohol and come up with your own plan of action to avoid them. Share them with your sponsor, a therapist or a trusted family member or friend in order to remain accountable for your recovery process!

How Much Does Crystal Meth Cost in Texas?

When looking at the average price of crystal meth, the street value can vary from city to city, state to state, region to region. Due to our close proximity to the source of 90 percent of the meth available in the United States, the price of meth is typically lower in Texas, than in many other parts of the country. Most of the methamphetamine available in the United States comes across the southern border with Mexico. Due to government crackdowns in the early and mid 2000’s, much of the domestic manufacturing of meth dried-up. This brought a booming business opportunity to Mexican drug cartels and now they are flooding communities in Texas and the US with cheap, highly potent crystal meth.

But how much does meth cost? An addiction to crystal meth will cost as much as you are willing to give. Your home, your family, your job, your friends, your car, your health, even your life. Crystal meth addiction can be very expensive, not just for your pocket book, but a long-term addiction to meth can literally cost you your livelihood and your life.

According to the RAND Corporation, methamphetamine and amphetamine abuse costs the United States roughly $23.4 billion dollars per year. This data was compiled to develop consistent analysis of the many casual associations for the multitude of different harms associated with this deadly drug. Due to the nature of the data available (the most recent year being 2005) researchers created a range of estimates for the total societal cost of methamphetamine abuse in the United States:

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Taking all of these factors into account, crystal meth addiction costs much more than would be readily imaginable. Accidental drug overdose death, lost productivity in the workforce, meth addiction rehabilitation services, criminal justice system costs, child endangerment and production hazards from meth labs (chemical poisoning, explosions, property damage, etcetera) all create enormous costs associated with this devastating drug.

Crystal meth is not only highly addictive, it is also the leading cause of drug overdose death in Texas.

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An addiction to crystal meth can overtake your entire life. While rehab can be difficult, it is worth it.

Methamphetamine is a powerful stimulant that has been shown to release up to four times as much dopamine in the brain as cocaine. Because it is much cheaper than even crack cocaine, meth has become a very popular drug throughout many different segments of the population. It’s not just in the big cities, like Houston, Dallas or San Antonio. Meth is also a major problem for rural communities across Texas and the nation as a whole.

Due to the relative costs of meth, compared with other stimulants like cocaine, or even Adderall, meth is growing in popularity, regardless of the multiple dangers associated with its use. Even many street drug users have switched from crack cocaine to crystal meth, because it is much cheaper and the high typically lasts much longer. Even though the addict may think they are saving money by switching to methamphetamine, yet a typical meth addict can spend anywhere from $10,000, up to $40,000 per year on acquiring the drug according to conservative estimates. Some estimates state that a person who has developed a long-term addiction can spend up to $74,000 a year on their meth habit.

It’s not just financial costs that make methamphetamine a major problem for many Texas residents. Stimulants, like crystal meth kill more Texans every year than any other type of drug. Meth kills even more people than prescription and illicit opioids do. One of the major reasons for this is that there aren’t any life-saving medications for a meth overdose, like there are for other drugs. For instance, in the case of an opioid overdose, first responders and emergency personnel have the drug Narcan (naloxone) at their disposal. This is an opioid antagonist, that can block the brain’s opioid receptors and essentially reverse the affects of an opioid overdose.

For stimulants like methamphetamine, there is no overdose-reversing drug available. First responders often have trouble with meth overdoses, because many times the subject may be unconscious. This makes it hard for the emergency technicians to determine what is happening to the person. Often with a meth overdose, the person had been using multiple substances so it makes it difficult to determine the best approach to emergency medical care. All of these factors contribute to the increase of meth-related overdose deaths in Texas.

Treatment for meth addiction is available. Recovery is possible.

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Treating an addiction to methamphetamine is never an easy task. While a lot of focus has been on the opioid epidemic, meth use is silently roaring back into popularity all across American communities. Where federal funding has been pouring out into these communities to help fight the ongoing opioid crisis, little resources are made available to fight the scourge of methamphetamine abuse that is sweeping the nation.

This is unfortunate as the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) says that methamphetamine is currently the number one threat to Houston and the rest of the state. The number of overdose deaths, emergency room visits, treatment admissions and law enforcement seizures are all much higher than they are for heroin, which is the number two threat to Texas residents.

This crisis is compounded by the fact that there is no FDA-approved medication currently available to treat a methamphetamine addiction. Researchers at the University of Texas are currently working on a clinical trial for a two-medication treatment that is designed to block the euphoric affects of crystal meth and to reduce the painful symptoms associated with meth withdrawal.

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It's never easy to quit using drugs, especially crystal meth. Addiction Recovery is possible however, with the right help.

The withdrawal symptoms are a major reason many who struggle with an addiction to meth are afraid to seek treatment. The crash that comes with stopping the use of the drug can be seemingly unbearable. Lethargy, massive mood swings and depression are all very extreme in the case of a meth withdrawal. Sometimes the patient can become violently ill. The fear of the crash is why many people continue their use, even when they really, really want to quit.

If you or a loved one is experiencing an addiction to methamphetamine, you should know that the best time to quit is right now. The longer a meth addiction goes untreated, the more likely severe medical issues can take place. These dangers include accidental overdose death. 715 people in Texas died from an overdose on methamphetamine in 2017 and 320 sought emergency medical attention. There’s no reason this could be yourself or your loved one someday if the addiction continues.

Please give us a call today. At More Than Rehab, we offer a full-spectrum of services to not only help you overcome your addiction, but to help you rebuild your life. Our social model of addiction recovery was designed to help you prepare yourself to live a lifetime of sobriety, long after you leave our drug rehabilitation program. We know how much damage can be done with a long-term binge on crystal meth. Our experienced, compassionate staff is here to help you in every way possible, beginning with a full medical detox. Don’t wait another day, call us right away. We are available 24/7 to help you when you’re ready.

(888) 249-2191

Crystal Meth is Making a Worrisome Comeback in Texas

While the news headlines are dominated by the opioid epidemic ravaging the United States, crystal meth is making a relatively silent, but deadly return. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the rate of overdose deaths for methamphetamine more than tripled from 2011 to 2016 and that number keeps growing to this day. This is partly due to the increase of cheap, highly potent methamphetamine coming over the US/Mexico border. With the national attention and focus on opioids by public health officials, politicians and government agencies, meth has quietly made a comeback in the US. This likely will not change course, without the proper resources and greater public awareness of the nation’s problems associated with crystal meth.

When drug overdoses began to take more American lives each year than gun violence or car accidents, the attention (and funding) from federal, state and local governments was largely focused on prescription and illicit opioids. The good news is that these efforts may actually be working.

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New provisional CDC data shows that drug overdose deaths fell significantly in 2018. This is the first decrease in decades. From the data, it appears that government efforts to prevent doctors from over-prescribing, while making it easier for first-responders to carry naloxone (a life-saving opioid-antagonist) undoubtedly have helped make a real difference in the fight to curb drug overdose deaths.

With prescription painkiller abuse on the decline, drug overdose deaths from crystal meth and fentanyl are the new problem in the United States.

Unlike illicit and prescription opiates, methamphetamine addiction does not have any FDA-approved medications to assist in treatment and rehabilitation efforts. Drugs like buprenorphine, or Suboxone are available to help ease the symptoms of opioid withdrawal. These evidence-based, medication-assisted treatments (MAT) can also help reduce the likelihood for relapse later in recovery. By blocking opioid receptors in the brain, MATs are valuable tools for addiction treatment programs. These medications have shown a verifiable success rate in patients who are struggling with an addiction to opiates.

Meth on the other hand, can cause equally painful and severe withdrawal symptoms. Currently there are no medications available to ease the withdrawal symptoms associated with a physical or psychological chemical dependency to methamphetamine. Detox and treatment for an addiction to methamphetamine can therefore be quite difficult for most patients.

Another problem with the relative lack of effective treatment options for people who become addicted to meth, the ease of access to meth is currently at an all time high. In the 1990’s and early 2000’s we witnessed a major crackdown on illegal meth labs operating within the United States. Meth labs were quite prevalent in Texas, especially in the Houston and San Antonio areas. These ranged from very small operations in an RV in the desert or in someone’s garage, to giant meth super labs in warehouses. Once the Federal Government began imposing stricter regulations on the sale and availability of pseudoephedrine (Sudafed), meth manufacturing labs pretty much became extinct in the US.

These days, the major Mexican drug cartels supply most of the crystal meth that is found in American cities and rural areas. This meth is much cheaper and more potent than ever before. The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) reports that the current price of meth is the lowest they’ve seen in years. The Mexican drug cartels, with new manufacturing techniques are also producing meth that’s more than 90 percent pure. This highly-potent crystal meth is creating an entirely new generation of addicts across the nation, at a level of epidemic proportions.

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For comparison, in 2017, 813 people died from an overdose on crystal meth, while 591 died from a heroin overdose in Texas.

One of the major complications with a substance use disorder is that the patient can be using multiple substances at any given time. Emergency responders have a difficult time with drug overdoses, because while the patient may be unconscious they have no idea how to treat the overdose. Many people who use crystal meth, are also using other substances as well. Some end up using methamphetamine in the morning and opioids at night, while trying to balance a ‘normal’ lifestyle through the use of various different drugs.

Many of the fatal overdose deaths involving methamphetamine can also be partially blamed on opioids. The extremely dangerous synthetic opiate, fentanyl has been frequently found in different batches of methamphetamine all over the country. This contamination may be intentional, or it may be the result of drug labs that produce and package different substances, where cross-contamination of different drugs may be entirely by accident.

What are the different drug rehab options for someone who is addicted to crystal meth?

The addiction treatment specialists at More Than Rehab have helped people all types of people, many of whom are struggling with an addiction to multiple substances. Our comprehensive drug rehabilitation program can help people with any type of addiction, while we can even address the underlying causes of substance abuse. We see the addiction is often just a symptom of another deeply-rooted mental health issue. This is called a dual-diagnosis and our staff is well-equipped to help people who exhibit both a substance use disorder, along with an underlying mental health issue.

Our approach to meth addiction treatment focuses on making the whole person healthy, mentally, physically and spiritually. Often an addiction is merely a symptom of unresolved trauma that has led the patient to self-medicate, while they attempt to drown-out their sorrows. Since no medication assisted treatment exists specifically to treat a meth addiction, our facility uses a robust combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), group therapy, contingency management and relapse prevention. A variety of other treatment techniques could be used in conjunction with these, depending on the patient’s own unique, individual needs.

If you, a family member, friend or loved one are struggling with any type of drug addiction, please give us a call as soon as possible. The longer you wait to get substance abuse treatment, the harder it can be to quit. Most people who die as a result of complications from meth abuse are from a brain hemorrhage, seizure, or a heart attack. This is especially true for older addicts, as their bodies are no longer equipped to handle a long-term episode of substance abuse.

It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been using, or how much you have used in the past. More Than Rehab can help addiction at any level of severity. If this has been a wake-up call for either yourself, or your family, or friends, please talk to someone about the problem as soon as possible. Addiction won’t go away by itself. When you’re ready to change your life for the better, give us a call. We are available 24/7 to help you when you need it.

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Why is Meth so Hard to Quit?

Methamphetamine, speed, ice, or crystal meth is hard to quit simply because it is one of the most addictive drugs known to exist. In the 1990’s and early 2000’s methamphetamine was a major problem in Texas and across the whole nation because the ingredients were relatively easy to obtain at your local, street corner drug stores. The availability of ephedrine and other cold medications used to manufacture meth was at a high point. Then, between 2005-2006, the United States Federal Government began regulating the cold medicines used to manufacture meth. This created a decrease in meth production, coupled with a decrease in social indicators of misuse and abuse for the drug.

This decline in drug abuse indicators for meth continued until fairly recently. Methamphetamine has made quite the comeback, especially in southern and western states, partially due to the influence of the Mexican drug cartels. This new methamphetamine epidemic has been overshadowed by the constant media headlines of the opioid epidemic. While many politicians, governing agencies and the news media are focused on heroin and prescription pain killer overdose deaths, meth is silently killing thousands of Americans every year. Sadly, it appears only to be getting worse.

Methamphetamine is incredibly addictive, which makes meth hard to quit.

With the US crackdown on meth labs in the early 2000’s, we have a new precursor to methamphetamine manufacture known as phenyl-2-propanoe (P2P). This is what the Mexican drug cartels use in meth production that makes their versions so much more potent. The increase in meth potency from south of the border also makes the substance much, much more addictive. The intoxicating effects of Mexican meth is far greater that what we saw just a decade ago coming from American meth labs. The potency alone contributes to substance abuse and addiction at a far higher rate than we’ve seen in the past.

In Houston, Texas, the presence of methamphetamine is at an all time high, according to the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). Meth lab seizures in Texas are virtually non-existent, however as the majority of the drug seizures in the United States can be traced back to Mexico. Meth from Mexico is typically transported to the US in liquid form. The liquid methamphetamine is smuggled into the US in modified gas tanks. This liquid meth is then converted into its typical crystal form at conversion labs here in the US. This is commonly a much more potent form of the drug than we’ve seen in the past. Lab testing in 2007 showed an average meth purity level of 39 percent. Today, meth found on the streets in the US typically tests around a level of 93 percent purity.

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The greater availability and increased potency of meth, means more abuse and more drug overdoses.

Stimulant overdoses from cocaine and meth are the leading cause of drug overdose deaths in the state of Texas. Fentanyl overdose deaths are also spiking currently and many attribute this to the increase in stimulant overdoses. This is somewhat ironic, as fentanyl is a synthetic opioid, which is quite the opposite of a stimulant. However, drug dealers in Texas will order the drug from China and mix it in with their supply of cocaine, methamphetamine or counterfeit prescription pills. No one is completely certain as to why drug dealers mix fentanyl with drugs that are supposed to have the exact opposite effect, but it may be to increase the perceived potency of their drugs, or it might even be entirely accidental. Some drug labs or pill mills (which Houston is notoriously known for), may manufacture or cut different drugs with the same lab equipment, which can lead to unintentional cross-contamination of drugs. Fentanyl is so deadly that just a dose the size of 3 grains of salt is enough to kill an average human being.

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Many who abuse methamphetamine are also known to use other substances as well. The Chicago Tribune recently ran a story about dual addiction, titled: “Meth in the morning, heroin at night”. Across the nation, meth use is on the rise and many experts are saying the opioid epidemic has given crystal meth a resurgence. Opioid users who admit to using meth as well has gone up from 19% in 2011 to 34% in 2018. This evidence suggests that as doctors began to cut back on writing prescriptions for opioids, that many users began to seek street drugs like meth and heroin.

For others, methamphetamine and opioids can offer a type of synergistic high. The two types of drugs in combination can sort of balance each other out, making it seem that the user is able to function normally. In the past, the term “speedball” (which was a mix of heroin and cocaine) was used to describe the balancing of two, seemingly opposite drugs. This combination has been deadly, killing many people, including notable celebrities such as: John Belushi, Chris Farley, Ken Caminiti, Mitch Hedberg, Chris Kelly and Phillip Seymour Hoffman.

In theory, the meth combats the opioid’s drowsiness, while the opioid balances out the erratic, spastic “tweakiness” of the methamphetamine. Many people who abuse any type of drug end up “chasing the dragon” trying to feel “normal” again. For some people, their “normal” is constantly changing. This happens as their body’s tolerance to the drugs they’re using fluctuates, or the potency or types of drugs they are currently using can change rapidly as well. This is a dangerous balancing act, one that has led many people to dangerous and deadly consequences.

Meth is a drug that is very hard to quit. The crisis at the US-Mexico border has helped create a meth-overdose epidemic.                  

While the opioid crisis appears to be slowing-down, a new meth-fueled crisis is poised to take its place. It is estimated that 774,000 Americans used methamphetamine in 2017. When US lawmakers cracked-down on the manufacture of meth in the mid-2000’s, it worked. That is, until the Mexican drug cartels filled-in the gap. Now meth is available in virtually every community across the United States. While it is extremely important to keep focusing efforts on combating the opioid epidemic, we should be looking at ways to help people who need treatment for an addiction. This act alone would cut down on the demand for these dangerous drugs, which is the first step towards truly combating the problem.

If you or someone you know needs help with a substance abuse problem, please don’t hesitate to call us at More Than Rehab. We are available 24/7 to help or your loved one create the foundation to live a better life. We offer the best in evidence-based addiction treatment in the greater Houston area. Please don’t wait any longer, call us right away:

(888) 249-2191

Can You Afford Drug Rehabilitation?

If there were two primary obstacles to attending addiction treatment, they would most likely be a fear of asking for help and the doubt that they could even afford drug rehabilitation. Addiction treatment can be prohibitively expensive for many people who struggle with addiction, so how can you find out if you’re eligible to receive help when you’re ready for it? Millions of Americans still cannot afford health insurance, even with the passage of the Affordable Care Act, or “Obamacare”. While the well-intentioned government mandate that all health insurance plans available on the open exchange must cover mental health (including addiction treatment), there are still a lot of people who can’t afford health insurance to begin with.

Most people who have a substance use disorder may not even realize that addiction treatment might be covered by a health insurance plan they currently hold. This leaves the average person truly unaware of the costs associated with addiction treatment and drug rehab in Texas, and across the nation. Addiction treatment costs widely vary too, depending on the type of substance you’re addicted to, the level of addiction and the types of treatment you need to receive.

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Scientific, evidence-based approaches to drug rehabilitation are likely the most cost-effective versions of care, as they offer a proven success rate, regardless of age, gender and other demographics. These methods of rehabilitation can literally be life-saving so it is difficult to put an accurate price tag on rehabilitation. A lot of this comes from the perspective of the money you’ll be saving, taken for granted that the rehab works.

Addiction to drugs can be very expensive, let alone costing you your life...  

Say you have a major cocaine addiction, the typical addict can spend anywhere from $200-$1,000 a day on the drug during a heavy binge. This equates anywhere from $6,000, up to $30,000 a month for the simple maintenance of your coke habit. If rehabilitation works, just think of the money you could actually save in the long run. This is just one extreme example, but the bottom line is your livelihood and the chance to spend the rest of your life doing things with your family and close friends, versus chasing a high from a drug that will ultimately only ruin your life.

The different types of drug rehab and their associated average cost in Texas.

There are many different types of drug rehabilitation and different levels of care with each option and for each individual’s unique needs. Let’s break down the options below.

Detox: a full-medical detox is commonly the first step of a longer, more in-depth alcohol or drug rehabilitation. Some patients will only receive the detox part of rehab, because they think that’s all they’ll need. Detox will help you get off of the drugs or alcohol in a safe, medically monitored way. Some addictions have severe withdrawal symptoms that in some cases can be deadly. In the case of opiates, alcohol and benzodiazepines, quitting cold-turkey can have deadly consequences. Seizures, heart palpitations and delirium tremens could all possibly result in death. Again, the cost will vary depending on the severity of the chemical dependency and the type of substance you are detoxing from. Typically a medical detox at an outpatient clinic will run anywhere from $1,000 to $2,000 dollars.

Inpatient drug rehab: Most inpatient drug rehabilitation centers will require a minimum 30 day stay. Some require longer stays with a 90 day program. Depending on the area, and types of services provided the typical cost of inpatient drug rehab will range anywhere from $6,000 to $20,000 or more per month. Some rehab centers are quite luxurious, offering amenities that go far beyond what is required to quit using drugs or alcohol. These “destination rehabs” can go well beyond $20,000 per month and are typically reserved for movie stars and highly-paid CEO’s.

Outpatient addiction treatment: An outpatient treatment program can be much less expensive than a stay at an inpatient facility. Outpatient drug rehab programs usually comprise of support groups and individual therapy sessions, completed daily and you can typically attend these programs around your busy school or work schedules. Outpatient programs can be good enough for a mild addiction, but it could end up taking much longer than a stay at an inpatient facility. Outpatient drug rehab programs typically run around $5,000 for a three-month program.

A note about medication-assisted treatment (MAT) and evidence-based drug rehab.

An evidence-based approach to addiction treatment typically offers the highest success rates of any type of drug rehabilitation. For a patient who is addicted to alcohol or opiates like painkillers or heroin, medication may be beneficial to help you quit using. These medications, like buprenorphine, Suboxone or methadone are beneficial to help ease the painful, early withdrawal symptoms.

Evidence based methods of treatment show greater success rates when combined with individual and group therapy sessions, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, 12 step program integration and other supporting treatment options. Some medications will be taken for up to 12 months and the yearly cost of these medications will be around $5,000 per year.

How do I pay for addiction treatment? How Can We Afford Drug Rehabilitation? 

Most people will pay for a drug rehabilitation program with their insurance coverage. Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), otherwise known as “Obamacare” health insurance plans on the exchange will pay anywhere from 60-90% of the cost of drug rehabilitation program. This has been an important step to fighting the nations current drug overdose and opioid epidemic. Now more people have access to life-saving drug rehab services than ever before. If you are struggling with addiction and need treatment, you should consider looking into your health insurance coverage options.

If you cannot afford drug rehabilitation, some people will take out personal loans to pay for their addiction treatment. Attaining sobriety and giving yourself the amount of care you deserve is worth the money. You can think of rehab as an investment into making a better life for yourself, your family and your friends. Think of the alternative without attending rehab, typically you can either A) end up in jail, or B) continue your substance abuse and possibly die from a drug overdose. Sobriety is worth it and while it may seem difficult, sobriety is very much an attainable goal.

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With so many different options for you to get help, it is possible for almost everyone to get the addiction treatment they need. If for some reason, none of these options are a possibility for you or your loved one, there are many state-funded programs available to you. The Texas Department of Health and Human Services has a searchable database of low-cost rehab programs on their website: https://dshs.texas.gov/sa-search/. But do keep in mind that many of these government run programs will have long waiting lists, with robust eligibility requirements.

If you need help right away please don’t hesitate to give us a call at More Than Rehab. We strive to offer the best quality addiction treatment programs in the Houston, Texas area, at a low cost to our clients. We never want cost to prohibit you from getting the help you need. In many cases, we can find a way to offer care at little to no cost for you out of pocket. Please call us anytime, we are available 24/7 to take your call:

888-249-2191

Athletes and Drug Abuse: A Disturbing Trend in Modern Sports

Drug abuse is a common occurrence across all types of sports, at all competitive levels. Besides just performance-enhancing drugs such as steroids and stimulants, many athletes feel compelled to abuse drugs and alcohol for a variety of other reasons. The intense pressure to perform, coupled with a possible underlying mental health disorder can all contribute to a drug abuse problem for today’s athletes. Intense pressures to execute peak performance, a life traveling on the road for weeks and months, all creating stress and the ripe conditions to self-medicate with alcohol and drugs. While most professional sports organizations like the NFL, NBA, MLB and NHL drug test their athletes, so many still turn to illicit substances to cope with the intense pressures of their professions.

The lavish lifestyle of professional sports also helps foster an environment, ripe with the potential for substance abuse to occur. Many professional athletes are highly paid and have access to social circles known for their excessive partying. It is very common in the United States to see sports stars getting arrested for drug-related crimes, failing drug tests or entering a drug rehab program. These types of stories are all over the news, seemingly all the time. Like millions of Americans, athletes are no less likely to develop a chemical dependency to drugs or alcohol than anyone else. It is sometimes surprising however, to see a person who’s job demands peak physical fitness, succumb to an addiction to drugs or alcohol.

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Why do some athletes turn to alcohol or drugs?

 Much like any other person, athletes can begin using drugs or alcohol for a variety of different reasons. The one semi-unique reason, somewhat specific to athletes is the area of performance-enhancing drugs. Some athletes feel that they need a competitive “edge” that will help them win, putting them the extra step ahead of their competitors. Athletics can come with a lot of pressure to perform and a win-at-all-costs attitude. Performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) come at a cost however. While steroids, personal growth hormones, stimulants and even diuretics can help users feel “enhanced” there are numerous, dangerous side-effects associated with their use.

The major side effects of performance enhancing drugs are arguably just as dangerous as any illicit street drugs are. Anabolic steroids can cause high blood pressure, high cholesterol, baldness, lost sex drive and decreased liver function. Human growth hormones can cause severe imbalances in the body, creating a greater risk for heart disease, diabetes, joint pain and carpal tunnel syndrome. Using stimulants as a performance enhancing drug can greatly increase the risk of a heart attack in athletes. Depending on the type of stimulant, a drug overdose could also occur which could lead to death very easily.

Aside from PEDs, athletes can become addicted to just about any other type of substance, exactly like anyone else. Athletes experience different injuries all the time. It is common for sports doctors to prescribe opioids like Oxycontin, Vicodin or Percocet for pain relief. Many athletes become chemically-dependent on these prescription pain killers because they are highly addictive. Depression, anxiety and other mental health issues can also contribute to a substance use disorder for athletes. In 2011, former boxing legend Oscar De La Hoya was highly depressed, even contemplating suicide at the height of his addiction to cocaine and alcohol. Luckily he sought help from a drug rehabilitation program, saying that overcoming his addiction was the “greatest fight of his life”.

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Professional sports, brain injuries and substance abuse.

A major controversy has surrounded professional sports for decades regarding traumatic brain injury and deaths related to contact sports, especially the NFL. Boxing, wrestling and ice hockey are also high impact sports that have a lot of players who experience concussions and other types of brain injuries. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a degenerative brain disease that can cause early onset dementia, chronic depression and memory loss. This brain disease was found in nearly all former NFL players according to numerous studies completed on the subject. Researchers have also shown a direct link between brain injury and substance abuse.

Since drug abuse is a major problem in sports, athletes need professional help from a drug rehabilitation center, just like any other person who is struggling with an addiction. More Than Rehab, located just outside of Houston, Texas is one of the best, evidence-based addiction treatment programs in the nation. Find out if we can help you, or a loved one who is struggling with a substance abuse problem right away. The sooner you call, the sooner we can help. We are open 24/7 to help you.

888-249-2191